<![CDATA[NBC Southern California - Celebrity]]> Copyright 2015 http://www.nbclosangeles.com/entertainment/celebrity http://media.nbcbayarea.com/designimages/NBC4_40x125.png NBC Southern California http://www.nbclosangeles.com en-us Tue, 04 Aug 2015 11:01:52 -0700 Tue, 04 Aug 2015 11:01:52 -0700 NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA["Ace of Cakes" Bakes the Obama Inauguration Cake]]> Sat, 19 Jan 2013 15:39:11 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/160*120/080409+Duff+Goldman.jpg

Baltimore celebrity baker Duff Goldman says the cake he's baking for President Barack Obama's inaugural ball is going to be more elegant than crazy, full of stars and stripes and a whole lot of glitter.

Goldman says the staff at his Charm City Cakes bakery, which had its extreme cakes featured in the Food Network show "Ace of Cakes," began Friday to decorate the details to put on the cake. They'll start baking the cake itself on Sunday, the day before the inauguration and the Commander in Chief's Ball where the cake will be served.

The finished product will stand 3 to 4 feet tall, drip with patriotic fondant bunting and sparkle with clusters of stars shooting out like fireworks.

"Glitter is going to be all over the place," Goldman said in a telephone interview.

On Saturday, four bakers were in the process of replicating in fondant and royal icing the presidential seal and the seals of the four military branches honored at the Commander in Chief's Ball. Goldman said they are focused on the details, such as making sure the eagle in the presidential seal faces the correct way and that the bird holds exactly six arrows in its talons. They also want to make sure they spell the Latin motto on the seal correctly: E pluribus unum.

"This is one you really want to spellcheck, big time," said Goldman, whose television show ran for 10 seasons before going off the air in 2011.

Goldman said the whole cake will take about 100 hours to complete. When finished, it is expected to weigh 50 pounds and serve several hundred people. Inside, guests will find Swiss buttercream frosting and layers of red velvet, lemon poppy seed, pineapple coconut, and pumpkin chocolate chip cake.

This isn't the only inauguration cake the bakery is making. Goldman says he is baking five other cakes for various inauguration events, including a 4-foot replica of the White House. Still, the Commander in Chief's Ball cake is special because the event at the Washington Convention Center is one of only two official parties the president will attend.

Goldman said he played it cool when the Presidential Inaugural Committee called about two weeks ago to ask him to make a cake.

"When you get off the phone you get to scream, 'We're making the inaugural cake,'" he said.

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<![CDATA[Josh Brolin Held on Public Intoxication Charge]]> Sat, 05 Jan 2013 23:41:04 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/01-brolin.jpg

Actor Josh Brolin, who plays a police sergeant in the upcoming Hollywood movie, "Gangster Squad," was arrested Wednesday after police found him heavily intoxicated and unable to care for himself on a Santa Monica sidewalk, police said on Saturday.

Brolin was contacted by police in the 1600 block of Ocean Avenue around 11:30 p.m. Tuesday, said Santa Monica Police Sgt. Richard Lewis.

Brolin was held in custody on a misdemeanor public intoxication charged and released.

"This was a booking only to hold him until he sobered up," Lewis said. "We do not normally file any charges on persons for simple intoxication."

Police said they would only book someone on a more serious charge and request that the City Attorney's Office prosecute if that person became a "chronic drain on resources" or has multiple arrests, Lewis said.

"In this case," Lewis said, "no further action is being sought."

Brolin's profile on imdb.com said his "rugged features" and "natural charm" have worked for him.

The son of actor James Brolin, his star has risen recently. He's played roles as a policeman, a hunter, and the President of the United States.

In his most recent film, "Gangster Squad," he plays Sgt. John O'Mara on a Los Angeles Police Department unit that chases notorious mobster Mickey Cohen.

Calls and emails to Brolin's agent had not been returned Saturday evening.

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<![CDATA[Snoop Lion Would Love to Show Kids How to Smoke Pot]]> Fri, 04 Jan 2013 11:58:33 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/212*120/AP100819031830.jpg

Of all the conversations Snoop Lion is awaiting to have with his three kids one day, there's one that has puffed its way ahead of all the others.

Snoop said in a recent interview with GQ magazine that he wants to have a sit down with his children about marijuana.

The legendary rapper, who changed his name in July from Snoop Dogg to Snoop Lion after a "spiritual awakening" during a trip to Jamaica, said he's looking forward to having the cannabis conversation.

"It's not that I would ever push weed on our kids," the rapper said in the January issue of GQ, "but if they wanted to, I would love to show them how, the right way, so that way they won't get nothing put in their s--- or overdose or trying some s--- that ain't clean."

His three children range in age from 12 to 18.

Last year, Lion, whose real name is Calvin Broadus, was arrested when a drug-sniffing K-9 found several joints and a prescription bottle with a half-ounce of marijuana in a trash can on his tour bus at a border inspection point in Texas.

Lion was arrested, issued a citation for misdemeanor drug possession and eventually released. 

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<![CDATA['Office' Star John Krasinski Heads for the 'Promised Land' With Matt Damon]]> Fri, 28 Dec 2012 11:41:36 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/john-krasinski-promised-land.jpg

When John Krasinski moonlights from “The Office” he doesn’t mess around.

For the film “Promised Land,” Krasinski took on more than one side gig: not only does he act in it, he also concocted the story and screenplay with author Dave Eggers and co-star Matt Damon, and served as a producer.

Centered on the environmental effects of fracking, a controversial means of extracting natural gas, “Promised Land” represents Krasinski’s latest bid to expand his Hollywood horizons as the “The Office” ends its final season. Krasinski sat down recently to talk about his new film and what the future holds.

On the how the story’s setting inspired the issue at the core:

I had the idea for the script about two years ago, and my dad grew up in a small town outside of Pittsburgh in Natrona Heights, which was a steel mill town, and his dad worked three jobs, and they didn't have very much. And I remember when he was telling us, when I was a little kid – I was an ignorant eight-year-old – and I said, ‘So was your childhood awful?’ And he was like, ‘No, it was amazing. We had friends and family, and there was a sense of community and the faith that tomorrow would be a better day.’ And that really stuck with me my whole life, and I think the older I got, the more I realized that the country was moving away from that sort of pure ideal of community. So that's what the idea came from, and that's where I really started. So natural gas came in as an issue later on in the project once we had started coming up with these characters and this town and these groups of people that were going to interact, and it turned out to be the best backdrop for the story because it was basically just like high-stakes poker. There was so much potentially to gain and so much potentially to lose

On the reaction of the real people of Pennsylvania grappling with fracking’s pros and cons:

The really moving part was when we actually went to shoot in the town, they were so generous and so open to have us. But at the same time, people weren't against coming up and telling you how they really felt. And there were people who came up and said, ‘You shouldn't be making this movie. This is really good for us.’ And five minutes later, someone would come up and say, ‘Thank you for making this movie.’ We never expected it to be the movie that deals with this issue. Our whole thing was at the end to start a conversation, and whether it's fracking or something else, it's like these issues are something that have communities getting together and making decisions for themselves… is really the most important thing, especially this day and age.

On attempting to depict the residents of small town America without condescending or pandering:

I think sometimes the movies just show small town America as the people who just get bowled over by anyone who has an idea and in comes innovation and creators, and they just push these people aside. That's not the truth at all. These people are very dedicated to their opinions and very proud of where they're from. And that was the thing about getting there and first of all seeing how gorgeous it was. I mean it was beautiful…The truth is that you see what these people are fighting for. And when I say what they're fighting for, I don't mean either side of the issue. What I'm saying is that they are fighting for what everybody else is fighting for: their family, their friends, what they are from and where they're going. And it's a self-protective survival mode, and that's what's so admirable about these people really digging in on these issues. And it's happening all over the country.

On writing the screenplay with Matt Damon:

I met Matt when he was doing a movie with my wife [Emily Blunt], ‘The Adjustment Bureau,’ and we became friendly right away – which was really nice because being from Boston, the guy from ‘Good Will Hunting’ is pretty much the mayor of some fictitious town. One day we were on a double date, and he said, ‘I'm actually thinking of directing. Is there anything you that have in the works that you'd be willing to share with me?’ I said ‘Yeah’ and I brought him this idea, and he jumped onto it right away. We were writing within a week or two, and it worked really, really well. He actually was shooting ‘We Bought a Zoo’ in California at the time, and I was shooting my show ‘The Office,’ so we were kind of moonlighting. We worked really well together. We worked really fast. We have similar sensibilities and similar sense of humors, but at the end of the day, I think we're eternal optimists, so we wanted the same thing. We wanted this to be an uplifting kind of Frank Capra, Kazan movie. Where we were headed was always the same, so getting there was a lot quicker.

On where writing fits into his future after “The Office” ends:

I'm definitely going to cultivate it further. This was an incredible learning experience for me on every level, but I think, if I'm honest, the truth is it's a really big moment for me. This is a transition from the show that I think is meaning more to me than I think anybody knows. I think to have this show end is going to be such an incredibly emotional moment for me. Not only because of the show and the cast and the crew and that family aspect, but it's an era of my life that's going to be gone – and it is my twenties, basically. It's one of the most important decades of my life was spent with this show. And I owe it absolutely everything. No one would know my name if it wasn't for that show, and I wouldn't have any opportunity if it wasn't for this show, to sort of grow up and have that show support me. If someone asks me ‘What would you do if we gave you the keys?’ ‘This is the movie that I'd do if you gave me the keys.’ This is the kind of thing I've always been interested in. These are the characters that I've always been interested in watching or interested in playing, so I really want to do it more. And to have this team surrounding me – to write with Matt and to have Gus on board – it was so surreal and so inspiring, but also probably spoiled me because now I'm just like, ‘All I have to do is write some sort of document, then all of a sudden, Matt Damon and Gus Van Sant will sign on. How hard is this, folks?’ I don't know how the next ones are going to turn out, but also at home my wife was hugely supportive. And I'd always heard that story that the blank, white page is a scary thing. I'm like, ‘Come on – there are bigger things to be scared of.’ Then you sit down, and you realize, like, ‘Wow, that IS pretty scary.’ So she was the one who just kept saying ‘You can do it,’ and ‘Get up there and give it a couple more hours.’ And sure enough, it clicked, and I really, really loved it. So I'm going to give it a shot, and hopefully keep going as long as there's stories that I can tell well. And until then, I'll at least give it a shot.



Photo Credit: Focus Features]]>
<![CDATA[Matt Damon on Making 'Promised Land' With a Little Help From His Friends]]> Thu, 27 Dec 2012 12:48:13 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/damon-promised-land.jpg

Matt Damon is one of the busiest actors in Hollywood, so it’s not surprising that he had issues carving out the time to write and direct his passion project “Promised Land.” Fortunately, some close friends had his back.



When it came to crafting his screenplay about a conflicted gas company rep who heads to America’s Heartland to buy up land for the controversial drilling process known as fracking, Damon, already an Academy Award-winning screenwriter, teamed with actor John Krasinski, who in turn brought in his friend, acclaimed novelist David Eggers.

Damon befriended Krasinski’s while working opposite the "Office" star's wife, Emily Blunt, in “The Adjustment Bureau.” In addition to co-writing, Krasinski took on the role of Damon’s eco-minded nemesis in the film.

And when Damon realized he needed a director, he turned to another friend, “Good Will Hunting” helmer Gus Van.



The "Promised Land" star and producer sat down recently to talk about the huge lift he got from his friends, how he recruited Frances McDormand and Hal Holbrook, and whether he’s ready to re-team with another old pal, Ben Affleck, for a future film.



Has being a parent made you more environmentally conscious?



Probably, yeah. I thought a lot, before I had kids, what kind of world we're leaving them. I think it gave me pause. The world is fraught with so many challenges and perils. Kids don't ask to be here. We bring them here, and then it's like, ‘Hey – this is the fix you're in. Sorry.’ I did think about that, but ultimately, problems get fixed when people get engaged with them, so I figured why not raise some kids who are smart and conscientious and good citizens and want to pitch in and maybe they'll clean up some of these problems.



You’ve compared this process to when you write with Ben Affleck.



Yeah. I think because we're all actors, the way we write: we get up, we're walking around, we're improvising. We're playing all the different characters, and then pretty soon the characters start to talk back at you because you start to realize how they'd answer certain things, and that's when it gets really exhilarating. And that was the same with writing with both guys. We realized that for some reason I write with guys who are taller than me, funnier than me. I don't know what that is, but I guess I subconsciously seek out certain qualities in a writing partner.




What made Gus the go-to director when it turned out you wouldn’t be able to direct as originally planned?



He's such a humanist –the performances in Gus's movies, from his little movies to his bigger movies, always have that feeling of being captured. He just has a way of getting real human behavior out of the actors. There're the Hal Holbrooks, where you don't have to do much to get human behavior out of an actor of that stature and experience, but also the local folks and the people who we use in the movie who fill out the whole cast, Gus just has a way of putting everybody at ease, just filming the real world. And that's what we really wanted with this, was for it to feel like a moment in time in the country, where we are now, where we are today. John and I joke that my best contribution as a producer was firing myself(as director).



How did you land Frances McDormand?



Early on, we decided to write that part for Fran. I met Fran and worked with her in 1994, 18 years ago – she played my mom in a TNT movie that Tommy Lee Jones directed – so I kept in touch with her over the years and seen her sporadically, and I just love her. I love her work. At the same time, I was going to direct the movie, and we had an early draft of the script and I've shown it to Ben Affleck, to Cameron Crowe. John had shown it to Aaron Sorkin, and we’d gotten really positive feedback from those guys. So we said, ‘Okay. We're not crazy. She lives near me in New York, and I printed out a copy, and I walked over and left it at her apartment building. She wrote back like the next day and she said, ‘I'm in – I love it.’ That was a huge kind of milestone for us in the whole process, because not only did we get validation from a great actress and know that our script was in pretty good shape, but we also knew that we really were writing for her.

Equally huge would be bringing in Hal Holbrook.



That character's got to speak to the older America and where we've come from, and very simply and with great authority. So we just looked at a list of all the actors who were over 70 who we felt could do that, and there are a handful... Hal's 88 now and he's just the guy…The first town hall scene, we originally overwrote, because we didn't know how much of the pro- and anti-fracking arguments we were going to use, so we just literally wrote all of them and it was a 15-page scene. But we decided ‘Why don't we just shoot all of it, and then in the edit we'll cull it down.’ And so that's what we did – but Hal showed up in the first take and he just goes all the way through the dialog. I mean, he was just such a pro The guy is just a horse of a man. 



How hard is it to play a character who lies so convincingly and isn’t telegraphing it to the audience. Is that a tricky thing to wrap your head around?



He believes he's giving them the medicine they need, and that first scene sets up that idea of a guy who's seen industry leave. He's got this rage, and it’s also that kind of streak of self-loathing that you get in those great [Elia] Kazan protagonists. But he's not wrong either. So that's what we wanted. We wanted it to feel really complex, and there aren't any one-dimensional characters or easy answers. 



Do you and Ben have a project that you'd like to get around to together at some point?



We're developing a few. There's one Whitey Bulger project that we were looking at… But the big question of it is, what's your way in?  It's tough. They're the biggest batch of irredeemable...

 

"Promised Land" opens in limited release Dec. 28

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<![CDATA[Jenni Rivera Memorial Date Set]]> Tue, 18 Dec 2012 14:45:08 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/Jenni+Rivera.jpg

The family of Jenni Rivera announced that a private memorial service will be held for the recently deceased singer on Wednesday at the Gibson Amphitheatre in Los Angeles.

The memorial - called a "Celestial Graduation" by her family - will be held from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. and be led by Minister Pedro Rivera Jr.

"We will celebrate the graduation into heaven, with honors, of our beloved mother, daughter and sister Jenni Rivera," the statement read. "We appreciate the privacy and discretion given to the family on the day she is laid to rest. The burial services will be privately held."

Rivera died when the private plane she was traveling on crashed in a mountainous region of Mexico on Dec. 9.

Born in Long Beach, Calif., to Mexican immigrant parents, Rivera sold more than 15 million albums worldwide throughout her career and was a household name in Mexico and to Spanish speaking communities throughout the United States.

The 43-year-old mother of five was one of the biggest stars of banda, a brass-based, percussive form of Spanish-language pop music invented in northern Mexico but played heavily throughout the American Southwest. Banda traditionally was the domain of men, and Rivera's emergence and eventual dominance in the genre was groundbreaking.

Rivera's fame was expanding prior to the crash, thanks to a stint on television as the star of her own reality series "I Love Jenni" on Telemundo's mun2 cable channel, and the recent announcement that she had signed to take the lead role in a sitcom for ABC.

The company that owns the luxury jet on which she was traveling is under investigation by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, and the agency seized two of its planes earlier this year as part of the ongoing probe.

The Rivera family requested that in lieu of flowers at the memorial, donations be made to the Jenni Rivera Love Foundation - the charity founded by the singer which offers support services to single mothers and victims of both domestic and sexual abuse.



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA["The Voice" Soars]]> Tue, 18 Dec 2012 08:05:47 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/edt-the-voice-coaches-ah.jpg

 The first sign that "The Voice" was poised for its strongest season yet came early on, during the blind auditions.

Unlike the usual "American Idol" initial mix of the brilliant, the bad and the borderline psychotic, the four "Voice" coaches faced – or chose not to face – singers all seemingly worth a turn of the chair.

Three months later, “The Voice” is headed for a dramatic Season 3 finale, powered by some outstanding performers with a talent quotient reminiscent of the glory days of “Idol” – but with sounds all their own.

"The Voice" isn't ending without an "Idol"-style controversy. We're among those furious that Trevin Hunte, whose stunning performance of "And I am Telling You I am Not Going" proved the season highlight, got booted Dec. 11.

Still, his unfortunate departure highlights a depth of talent that can be seen ­– and heard – in the three remaining contenders: Nicholas David, who looks and sings like a latter-day Doobie Brother; Scottish rocker Terry McDermott, who looks like a Bay City Roller and sings like Rod Stewart; and Cassadee Pope, who looks like she might very well take the top prize and exit singing a happy tune.

McDermott and Pope are on Blake Shelton’s team, while David is a protégé of Cee Lo Green, leaving fellow coaches Adam Levine and Christina Aguilera out of the grand finale mix. But that’s just a subplot: While the coaches and their rivalries are a key part of the show, the primary emphasis of “The Voice” is where it belongs – on the contestants.
That’s probably the biggest difference between the NBC show and Fox’s “Idol,” which has suffered in recent years from panelist shufflings that too often overshadow the music. “The X Factor,” which is set for its own season finale on Fox this week, benefited from the additions of Britney Spears and Demi Lovato this season. But the bickering – particularly former “Idol” bad guy Simon Cowell vs. Lovato, and Cowell vs. L.A. Reid – detracts from strong performers like 13-year-old Carly Rose Sonenclar, perhaps the best bet to earn the top prize, a $5 million recording contract.
Sure, the banter among the coaches on “The Voice” can get heated. But Shelton, Levine, Green and Aguilera frequently encourage and praise rival acts – a stark contrast from, say, Reid’s bitter criticism of Cowell’s favorite group of the moment, Fifth Harmony.
The novelty of “The Voice,” of course, could fade, and the show could be risking overexposure by producing 30 one or two-hour installments over 14 weeks. Next season, Usher and Shakira are set to spell Green and Aguilera for a cycle, potentially altering the so-far winning chemistry.
Season 4 is expected to arrive in the spring, when “Idol,” still the big daddy of the genre, is a couple of months into its 12th outing. The new judges lineup boasts Mariah Carey and Nicki Minaj, whose battling already is making publicity friendly headlines, as well as Keith Urban and holdover Randy Jackson.

In the end, success – at least for the contestants – should come down to whose voice soars highest. The two-night “Voice” finale on Monday and Tuesday seems worth a spin of the chair to face the music. In the meantime, check out a promo below:

 

 

Hester is founding director of the award-winning, multi-media NYCity News Service at the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism. He is the former City Editor of the New York Daily News, where he started as a reporter in 1992. Follow him on Twitter.



Photo Credit: Paul A. Hebert/Invision/AP]]>
<![CDATA[Tina Fey and Amy Poehler Sparkle in Golden Globes Promo]]> Mon, 16 Dec 2013 13:56:37 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/212*120/tina+fey+amy+poehler+golden+globes+hosts.jpg

On the heels of Thursday morning's announcement of the nominees for the 70th annual Golden Globe Awards, the hosts of the ceremony gave viewers a little taste of what to expect when they take the stage at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Jan. 13.

The 40-second spot shows Tina Fey and Amy Poehler dressed to the nines in sparkling gowns and feigning faux Hollywood glamour accents. It's a performance that "will never get old!" exclaims Poehler. To the relief of both, it does.

Lucky for viewers, both were nominated in the best actress TV comedy category (Fey for "30 Rock" and Poehler for "Parks and Recreation"), which should offer up endless comedic fodder on the night. Especially after the winner is announced.

The Golden Globe Awards, hosted by Tina Fey and Amy Poehler, will be broadcast live on NBC Jan. 13.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Globe Noms: For the Love of History]]> Mon, 16 Dec 2013 13:56:37 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/edt-annehathaway.jpg

Steven Spielberg's civil-war set drama "Lincoln" led the way with seven nods when the Hollywood Foreign Press announced the Golden Globe Award nominations in Hollywood.

Proof once again that when it comes to getting attention at the Globes, the more historical your vehicle (real or imagined) the more love the Hollywood Foreign Press is likely to bestow.

A quick look back at films that have walked away winners at the Globes for best picture in either a drama or comedy/musical show a long history for works that imagine the past: "Amadeus" (1985), "Out of Africa" (1986), "The Last Emperor" (1988), "Driving Miss Daisy" (1990), "Schindler's List" (1994), "Titanic" (1998), "Shakespeare in Love" (1999), "Gladiator" (2001), "Chicago" (2003), "The Aviator" (2005) and "Dreamgirls" (2007).

It's only been in recent years that the HFPA has cast its eyes more consistently to current times, rewarding films such as "Slumdog Millionaire" (2008), "The Social Network" (2011) and "The Descendants" (2011).

That streak looks to be threatened with "Lincoln's" seven nominations, among them best director for Spielberg, best drama, best screenplay and acting honors for Daniel Day-Lewis, Sally Field and Tommy Lee Jones. These follow in the wake of four earlier nominations from the Screen Actors Guild and a record-breaking 13 nominations for the Critics Choice Movie Awards.

"Django Unchained," Quentin Tarantino's brutal revenge western, also received a large helping of award nomination love. The film, which scored Globe nominations for best drama, director, supporting actors (Leonardo DiCaprio and Christoph Waltz) and screenplay, was completely shut out of the Screen Actors Guild nominations in favor of "Zero Dark Thirty" and "Les Miserables."

Full List of 2013 Golden Globe Nominees

History-based drama from a more modern age was acknowledged with the Ben Affleck-directed Iran hostage crisis thriller "Argo" muscling in with four nominations for best drama, director, supporting actor (Alan Arkin) and screenplay.

And in the comedy-musical category, "Les Miserables" is the heavy-weight contender to compete with "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel," "Moonrise Kingdom," "Salmon Fishing in Yemen," "Silver Linings Playbook."

When it came to small screen fare, it was history-in-the-making that received the most attention. The Sarah Palin biopic "Game Change" racked up five nominations for best miniseries, actor (Woody Harrelson), actress (Julianne Moore), supporting actor (Ed Harris) and supporting actress (Sarah Paulson). Coming in second with four nods was the terrorist plot-based series "Homeland" up for best drama, actor (Damian Lewis), actress (Claire Danes) and supporting actor (Mandy Patinkin).

Another notable inclusion here was "Political Animals," the now canceled TV drama that revolved around a Hillary Clinton-esque Washington politician played by Sigourney Weaver that will compete for best miniseries and best actress (Weaver). The stiff upper lip of PBS darling "Downton Abbey" received three nominations: best drama, best actress (Michelle Dockery) and supporting actress (Maggie Smith, who also was named to the best actress comedy/musical category for "Quartet").

Offering up accolades in categories that cover drama, comedy and musicals on both big and small screens, it's no surprise the remaining list of nominees for the award ceremony set for Jan. 13 comprises a mixed bag of familiar names (Meryl Streep for "Hope Springs", Helen Mirren for "Hitchcock," Julia Louis-Dreyfus for "Veep"), already celebrated titles ("Les Miserables," "Zero Dark Thirty"  with four nominations apiece) and few new, or left field inclusions ("Salmon Fishing in the Yemen," "Moonrise Kingdom," "Girls," the leading ladies of "Nashville").

"Yemen" - a gentle, comedy of manners from Britain - was a big surprise when it was announced it would compete in the best comedy/musical category as well as best acting for leads Emily Blunt and Ewan McGregor. Released in March, the inclusion has turned the audience-appreciated yet oddly titled indie into the dark horse of the Globes.

Tina Fey and Amy Poehler Sparkle in Golden Globes Promo

New additions to this year's race are Connie Britton and Hayden Panetierre, who showed their singing chops on TV's "Nashville" to earn nominations for best actress and best supporting actress respectively. The love-it or loathe-it HBO series "Girls" scored two times for best series comedy and best actress (show creator and writer Lena Dunham). And Aaron Sorkin's "The Newsroom," also from HBO, is up for best series drama and best actor Jeff Daniels.

Wes Anderson’s films have long been Oscar bait but ignored by the HFPA. "Moonrise Kingdom's" elevation to the best picture comedy/musical category is a pleasant surprise, though it was the only recognition it received with Anderson failing to score a berth in the best director category.

A small screen snub went to "Mad Men," left hanging with only one nomination going to Jon Hamm in the best actor drama category.

Following last years' Globe love-fest of raunchy comedy "Bridesmaids," rumors swirled that the potty-mouthed teddy bear buddy comedy "Ted," directed by Seth MacFarlane, would be up for acknowledgment. No such luck as the Mark Wahlberg vehicle was noticeably absent when the nominees were revealed.

Adding extra comedy fodder to their hosting duties is the race between Amy Poehler ("Parks and Recreation") and Tina Fey ("30 Rock"), both named to the best actress TV comedy category. With former Globe winner Fey and former nominee Poehler both riding high on their current television success, the biggest winners on the night could end up being the viewers.

The Golden Globes, hosted by Tina Fey and Amy Poehler, will be broadcast live on NBC Jan. 13.



Photo Credit: Universal]]>
<![CDATA[Full List of 2013 Golden Globe Nominees]]> Mon, 16 Dec 2013 13:56:37 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/218*120/Golden+Globes+statues.jpg

The 2013 Golden Globe nominees were announced Thursday Dec. 13 in Los Angeles. Here's a full list of who and what could pick up an an award on Jan. 13.

Supporting Actor in a Television Series, Miniseries or Movie
Max Greenfield – “New Girl”
Ed Harris – “Game Change”
Danny Huston – “Magic City”
Mandy Patinkin – “Homeland”
Eric Stonestreet – “Modern Family”

Supporting Actress in a Television Series, Miniseries or Movie
Hayden Panettiere – “Nashville”
Archie Panjabi – “The Good Wife”
Sarah Paulson – “Game Change”
Maggie Smith – “Downton Abbey”
Sofia Vergara – “Modern Family”

Leading Actor in a Television Series, Drama
Steve Buscemi – “Boardwalk Empire”
Bryan Cranston – “Breaking Bad”
Jeff Daniels – “The Newsroom”
Jon Hamm – “Mad Men”
Damian Lewis – “Homeland”

Leading Actress in a Television Series, Drama
Connie Britton – “Nashville”
Glenn Close – “Damages”
Claire Danes – “Homeland”
Michelle Dockery – “Downton Abbey”
Julianna Margulies – “The Good Wife”

Television Series, Drama
“Breaking Bad”
“Boardwalk Empire”
“Downton Abbey”
“Homeland”
“The Newsroom”

Leading Actress in a Television Series, Comedy
Zooey Deschanel – “New Girl”
Julia Louis-Dreyfus – “Veep”
Lena Dunham – “Girls”
Tina Fey – “30 Rock”
Amy Poehler – “Parks & Rec”

Leading Actor in a Television Series, Comedy
Alec Baldwin – “30 Rock”
Don Cheadle – “House of Lies”
Louis C.K. – “Louie”
Matt LeBlanc – “Episodes”
Jim Parsons – “The Big Bang Theory”

Television Series, Comedy
“Big Bang Theory”
“Episodes”
“Girls”
“Modern Family”
“Smash”

Leading Actor in a Television Miniseries or Movie
Kevin Costner – “Hatfields & McCoys”
Benedict Cumberbatch – “Sherlock”
Harrelson – “Game Change”
Toby Jones – “The Girl”
Clive Owen – “Hemingway & Gelhorn”

Leading Actress in a Television Miniseries or Movie
Nicole Kidman, “Hemingway & Gelhorn”
Jessica Lang, “American Horror Story”
Sienna Miller, “The Girl”
Julianne Moore, “Game Change”
Sigourney Weaver, “Political Animals”

Television Miniseries or Movie
“Game Change”
“The Girl”
“Hatfields & McCoys”
“The Hour”
“Political Animals”

Original Song from a Motion Picture
Keith Urban – “For You,” from “Act of Valor”
Jon Bon Jovi – “Not Running Anymore,” from “Stand Up Guys”
Taylor Swift – “Safe and Sound,” from “The Hunger Games”
Adele – “Skyfall,” from “Skyfall”
Hugh Jackman – “Suddenly,” from “Les Miserables”

Original Score from a Motion Picture
“Life of Pi”
“Argo”
“Anna Karenina”
“Cloud Atlas”
“Lincoln”

Motion Picture, Foreign
“Amour”
“A Royal Affair”
“The Untouchables”
“Kon-Tiki”
“Rust and Bone”

Motion Picture, Animated
“Brave”
“Frankenweenie”
“Hotel Transylvania”
“Rise of the Guardians”
“Wreck It Ralph”

Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture
Alan Arkin – “Argo”
Leonard DiCaprio – “Django Unchained”
Phillip Seymour Hoffman – “The Master”
Tommy Lee Jones – “Lincoln”
Christoph Waltz – “Django Unchained”

Supporting Actress in a Motion Picture
Amy Adams – “The Master”
Sally Field – “Lincoln”
Anne Hathaway – “Les Miserables”
Helen Hunt – “The Sessions”
Nicole Kidman – “The Paperboy”

Leading Actor in a Motion Picture, Drama
Daniel Day-Lewis – “Lincoln”
Richard Gere – “Arbitrage”
John Hawkes – “The Sessions”
Joaquin Phoenix – “The Master”
Denzel Washington – “Flight”

Leading Actress in a Motion Picture, Drama
Jessica Chastain – “Zero Dark 30”
Marion Cotillard – “Rust and Bone”
Helen Mirren – “Hitchcock”
Naomi Watts – “The Impossible”
Rachel Weisz – “Deep Blue Sea”

Leading Actor in a Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical
Jack Black – “Bernie”
Bradley Cooper – “Silver Linings Playbook”
Hugh Jackman – “Les Miserables”
Ewan McGregor – “Salmon Fishing in the Yemen”
Bill Murray – “Hyde Park on Hudson”

Leading Actress in a Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical
Emily Blunt – “Salmon Fishing in the Yemen”
Judi Dench – “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel”
Jennifer Lawrence – “Silver Linings Playbook”
Maggie Smith – “Quartet”
Meryl Streep – “Hope Springs”

Motion Picture Screenplay
“Zero Dark 30”
“Lincoln”
“Silver Linings Playbook”
“Django Unchained”
“Argo”

Director of a Motion Picture
Ben Affleck – “Argo”
Kathryn Bigelow – “Zero Dark 30”
Ang Lee – “Life of Pi”
Steven Spielberg – “Lincoln”
Quentin Tarantino – “Django Unchained”

Motion Picture, Drama
“Argo”
“Django Unchained”
“Life of Pi”
“Lincoln”
“Zero Dark Thirty”

Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical
“The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel”
“Les Miserables”
“Moonrise Kingdom”
“Salmon Fishing in the Yemen”
“Silver Linings Playbook”



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Golden Globes 2013: The Nominees Are...]]> Thu, 10 Jan 2013 19:31:36 -0700 Best Picture, Drama
"Argo," "Lincoln," "Zero Dark Thirty" (above), "Life of Pi," and "Django Unchained."]]>
Best Picture, Drama
"Argo," "Lincoln," "Zero Dark Thirty" (above), "Life of Pi," and "Django Unchained."]]>
http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/zero-dark-thirty-jessica-chastain.jpg
See who's in the running for the 2013 Golden Globes on Jan. 13.

Photo Credit: jonathanolley.co.uk]]>
<![CDATA[Music, Comedy Heavyweights Rock Sandy Benefit Concert]]> Sun, 16 Dec 2012 15:45:38 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/Sandy+Concert_03.jpg Bon Jovi, Jon Stewart and Adam Sandler were among the stars who took the stage to raise money for victims of the superstorm.

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Martin Short's Big Night]]> Wed, 12 Dec 2012 15:03:13 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/201*120/martin+short+snl+jpg.jpg

The choice of Martin Short to host "Saturday Night Live" this weekend is about as surprising as his manic creation Ed Grimley missing an episode of "Wheel of Fortune."

Short hasn't hosted “SNL” in 16 years. And unlike other former cast members to return in recent seasons –Will Ferrell and Jimmy Fallon, to name two – he's not a major movie or TV star of the moment, despite his recurring role on "How I Met Your Mother."

But forgive us if we're as giddy as Grimley at a Pat Sajak fan convention. Tapping Short for the program's annual holiday show is a gift to his fans – and puts a much-deserved spotlight on an underrated comic talent who is far more than just the third of the “¡Three Amigos!"

Short commands a following that dates to his days on "SCTV" in the early 1980s. He gained wider exposure on "SNL," where in a single season – 1984-1985 – he made a memorable impact by playing a variety of oddballs, most somewhat annoying, but with an underlying sweetness (save for defensive defense lawyer Nathan Thurm).

Some of his best characters send-up show business and our obsession with it: Cigar-chomping old-school songwriter Irving Cohen (“Give me a ‘C’ – a bouncy ‘C!’”) and self-styled performing legend Jackie Rogers Jr. would have been right at home on the TV studio couch of Short’s post-“SNL” invention, the obese and obsequious celebrity interviewer Jiminy Glick.

It’s been nearly a decade since Short’s “Primetime Glick” exited Comedy Central, and even longer since his various attempts at legitimate talk show hosting success petered out. Still, Short’s long been a favorite talk show guest, thanks to his high energy, penchant for breaking into song and rubber-faced imitations (he does old-style Jerry Lewis better than Jerry Lewis). He’s earned many friends in show business, including fellow "Amigo" Steve Martin, who gave him scene-stealing moments in the "Father of the Bride" movies.
Those of us lucky enough to have seen Short’s 2006 Broadway review, "Fame Becomes Me," know he’s even funnier in person than on TV or in movies. The title of the show poked fun at the brand of show-biz smarminess he’s long parodied, and offered a self-deprecating knock at his own lack of superstardom. So we’re guessing Short has to be amused that his “SNL” musical guest – Paul McCartney – is one of the biggest stars in pop culture history.

As Short prepares for his return to Studio 8H, check out some funny promos below:

 

 

Hester is founding director of the award-winning, multi-media NYCity News Service at the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism. He is the former City Editor of the New York Daily News, where he started as a reporter in 1992. Follow him on Twitter.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Globes: 20 Years of Winning Movie Actresses]]> Mon, 05 Jan 2015 15:36:35 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/golden_globes.jpg From Emma Thompson to Michelle Williams, take a look back at the last two decades of Golden Globe-winning movie actresses.

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Globes: 20 Years of Winning TV Actresses]]> Mon, 05 Jan 2015 15:35:55 -0700 Claire Danes (above) of "Homeland" was named Best Actress in a Drama, and Laura Dern of "Enlightened" was named Best Actress in a Comedy. ]]> Claire Danes (above) of "Homeland" was named Best Actress in a Drama, and Laura Dern of "Enlightened" was named Best Actress in a Comedy. ]]> http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/160*232/137119023_10.jpg Two decades of TV legends.

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Ravi Shankar's Pop Power]]> Wed, 12 Dec 2012 09:42:12 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/ravi31.jpg

Ravi Shankar became the most unlikely of Western pop stars: a middle-aged master of the sitar largely unknown outside South Asia who suddenly found himself hanging out with the biggest rock acts of the 1960s and playing at the likes of the Monterrey Pop and Woodstock music festivals.

But the Indian musician, who died Tuesday at age 92, was far more than a fleeting 1960s hippy-dippy fad or just George Harrison's pal or Norah Jones' estranged dad. Ravi Shankar, in his own gentle way, shook and melded the worlds of Eastern and Western music, forging a legacy whose influence resounds long after his final note.
His death, which came on the eve of the 12/12/12 show to benefit victims of Hurricane Sandy, served as a reminder of perhaps his greatest achievement: organizing, with Harrison, the 1971 Concert for Bangladesh. The spectacle, four decades ago at Madison Square Garden, gave popular music a sense of power, responsibility and, most significantly, an expanded worldview.
Perhaps the biggest name among the superstars playing Wednesday's Garden gig is Paul McCartney, who, with John Lennon, Ringo Starr and Harrison unleashed the wave of the pop music experimentation that gave us early tastes of what some called raga rock.
Harrison, who first picked up a sitar while filming a scene in an Indian restaurant during the movie "Help!," started by putting a distinctive sitar line in the Beatles' "Norwegian Wood (This Bird has Flown)" in 1965. The Rolling Stones followed by memorably incorporating the instrument into the pounding "Paint it, Black."
But Harrison delved deeper, seeking out Shankar, already a top musician in his homeland, as a teacher. That led to "Love to You" on the "Revolver" album, as well as "The Inner Light," an ethereal, underrated Harrison composition that graced the B-side of "Lady Madonna." Shankar's touch, though, can be felt most deeply on the winding and weaving "Within You Without You," from the Beatles' landmark "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Heart Club Band" album.
While the Beatles were inspired by a long line of musicians growing up – Elvis Presley, Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly, to name a few – Shankar and Bob Dylan were among their few contemporary influences.
The Beatles' penchant for innovation sparked more pop musicians to expand their musical palettes – the results range from Led Zeppelin's "Kashmir" to Paul Simon's "Graceland" to the hip-hop ethos of genre-bending sampling. Shankar, whom Harrison dubbed the "godfather of world music," lived long enough to see musical boundaries dissipate, thanks to adventurous artists around the globe and an online, iTunes-driven era in which songs from all over can be summoned with a click.
Shankar tributes, at least on this side of the globe, are destined to stress his Beatle ties and assess him in Western terms. We're guilty on that account. But suspect that he'd be okay with accolades from all viewpoints. Ravi Shankar, perhaps better than any performer of the mass media age, recognized the power and value of popular music of all kinds, and died secure as a world legend.

Hester is founding director of the award-winning, multi-media NYCity News Service at the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism. He is the former City Editor of the New York Daily News, where he started as a reporter in 1992. Follow him on Twitter.



Photo Credit: AFP/Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA["The Hobbit": Ian McKellen on His Favorite Gandalf ]]> Thu, 13 Dec 2012 19:21:44 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/Hobbit+Trailer4.jpg

Sir Ian McKellen made the seemingly impossible transition in his early 60s from genius-level stage actor to beloved super villain and wizard of the silver screen. Now 73, McKellen is reprising the role of Gandalf for his third tent-pole trilogy, "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey."

"The Hobbit," which opens Friday, finds Gandalf enlisting Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) to join him and a band of 13 dwarves on a journey to slay the dragon Smaug and reclaim the treasure and mountain home of the dwarves.

McKellen held court at a recent New York City press conference, along with co-stars Elijah Wood, Richard Armitage, Freeman and Andy Serkis, to discuss the film.

In response to Armitage discussing what it's like to join an established franchise:

"It's not a franchise. They're films—this isn't 'X-men.'"

On putting a character behind you after shooting a film:

If you're acting away for film, it will be with a certain intensity… what you might have difficulty shaking off when you remove the costume and the make up is not the character, but the effort you put into it. The fact that it was difficult today or it was joyfully easy, or there was something you didn’t quite get right or were struggling over, and that effort, that's what you'll be thinking of. Rather than having been lost in the world of Middle Earth.

On who he prefers playing, Gandalf the White or the Grey:

Well, Gandalf the White in the second of the "Lord of the Rings" movies is on a mission and he has to save the world, or help save the world. And so he's cut his beard down to size and he's gone white in the process and he doesn’t have any jokes, no time for jokes. That's the story where the hero doesn’t make it back home. Bilbo gets back home because he's on an adventure, it's different. So he doesn’t need Gandalf the White to look after him, he needs the old, the grey, a man he can have a smoke with and a drink with and tick him off maybe, but they’ve learned to like each other's company and to trust each other. It's much more humane as befits the quality of the adventure they're going on. So there's a bit more range for the actor in Gandalf the Grey, and it's selfishly why I prefer doing him.

On how he played Gandalf differently this time:

Young Gandalf is younger, 60 years younger. I don't know, I just played him the same, didn’t I? I don't know, I'm trying to think… both of these films, these six films as there are going to be, in future will be viewed in the order not that they were filmed but in the order of the story, and it is going to be a little bit alarming for them to see, as it were, everyone getting younger. The technology… do you remember Gollum in the first movie? He looked like a glove puppet, and that's going to be a real shock when they go from "The Hobbit," with all this wonderful technology…

On J.R.R. Tolkien's world view:

I think there are limitations in Tolkien's view of the world. I mean, where is sex? Where are women? But, in other aspects, he is absolutely bang up to date. He takes old people very seriously, and gives them full weight and due. Young people, he's very keen on... And I think the message that has resonated with everyone who's read the books or seen the film is that, yes, the world is organized by people who are extremely powerful and… they are entirely dependent on the little guy. And for someone to be through two world wars to accept that, it's not the great people we build statues to change the world, it's the foot soldiers who measure up to the moment.

On claims that Peter Jackson's decision to turn a 320-page book into a trilogy was financially driven:

Anyone who thinks peter Jackson would fall for market forces rather than the artistic imperative, doesn’t know the guy... If we'd just made one movie of "The Hobbit," the fact is that all the fans, and I'm thinking now of the 8, 9 10-year-old boys and girls, they would watch it a thousand times. Well, they’ve now got three films they can watch a thousand times—it isn’t enough. And if you don’t quite plug into that, I sympathize with you, but these movies are not for you. Talk to any 9-year-old, they haven't just seen "Lord of the Rings" once, they've seen it twice, maybe three times--in a day. And how much better they should be seeing that, I mean a great film, I must say, with huge artistic endeavor and achievement, rather than other things they could be watching.

On working with Cate Blanchett, who plays Galadriel, the Elf Queen:

We had appeared in the same scene at the end of the final "Lord of the Rings" movie, but we hadn’t met. We met at a party... they photographed us separately. But for these two weeks, there she was in person. We have such a congenial relationship, because she's running practically the National Theater of Australia in Sydney, we had so much to talk about plays and everything else, as well as the fun of making a movie. And we got extremely close and affectionate with each other—her husband wasn't around—there was a moment when she adjusted my hair, but I think it was Cate rather than Galadriel, and I think it's made it into the movie, and I'm still rather shaken...

On what he learned about himself while shooting "The Hobbit":

I learned what I already knew, that I still have got a long way to go in terms of acting. I'm single, and Steve Thompson, a person that we all know because he's a wonderful cook, was looking me after in Wellington. He's also a masseur…and my whole life was living with this man—not having sex, he's straight—but I discovered that I got very, very, very used to the idea of being totally cossetted and looked after by somebody. He drove me everywhere, he got on my nerves an awful lot, but – Oh Steve I miss you…

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<![CDATA[2013 SAG Nominations: Full List]]> Wed, 12 Dec 2012 09:10:00 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/Les+Mis+-+Artwork.jpg.jpg

Historical dramas "Lincoln" and "Les Miserables" and modern dramedy "Silver Linings Playbook" lead the Screen Actors Guild Awards nominations with four each.

The list of films in contention for the awards were announced early Wednesday morning in Los Angeles. Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln," the film adaptation of the Victor Hugo stage musical "Les Miserables" and "Silver Linings Playbook" were all nominated for best ensemble cast along with the Ben Affleck-directed Iran-hostage thriller "Argo" and ex-pat British comedy "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel."

Historical dramas also held sway when it came to primetime television nods for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a drama series with the prohibition-era set "Boardwalk Empire" facing off against the stiff upper lip of PBS darling "Downton Abbey" and "Mad Men."  "Homeland" and "Breaking Bad" round out the category. 

The list lands just a day prior to the announcement of the nominations for the Golden Globes, and ramps up anticipation for a busy awards season that culminates with the Academy Awards in February.

The full list of SAG Award nominations are as follows:


Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role

BRADLEY COOPER / Pat - “SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK”
DANIEL DAY-LEWIS / Abraham Lincoln - "LINCOLN” (Touchstone Pictures)
JOHN HAWKES / Mark - "THE SESSIONS" (Fox Searchlight)
HUGH JACKMAN / Jean Valjean - "LES MISÉRABLES" (Universal Pictures)
DENZEL WASHINGTON / Whip Whitaker - "FLIGHT" (Paramount Pictures)

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role
JESSICA CHASTAIN / Maya - "ZERO DARK THIRTY” (Columbia Pictures)
MARION COTILLARD / Stephanie - “RUST AND BONE” (Sony Pictures Classics)
JENNIFER LAWRENCE / Tiffany - “SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK” (The Weinstein Company)
HELEN MIRREN / Alma Reville - “HITCHCOCK” (Fox Searchlight)
NAOMI WATTS / Maria - “THE IMPOSSIBLE” (Summit Entertainment)

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role
ALAN ARKIN / Lester Siegel - “ARGO” (Warner Bros. Pictures)
JAVIER BARDEM / Silva - "SKYFALL" (Columbia Pictures)
ROBERT DE NIRO / Pat, Sr. - "SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK" (The Weinstein Company)
PHILIP SEYMOUR HOFFMAN / Lancaster Dodd - “THE MASTER” (The Weinstein Company)
TOMMY LEE JONES / Thaddeus Stevens - “LINCOLN” (Touchstone Pictures)

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role
SALLY FIELD / Mary Todd Lincoln - "LINCOLN" (Touchstone Pictures)
ANNE HATHAWAY / Fantine - “LES MISÉRABLES” (Universal Pictures)
HELEN HUNT / Cheryl - “THE SESSIONS” (Fox Searchlight)
NICOLE KIDMAN / Charlotte Bless - "THE PAPERBOY” (Millennium Entertainment)
MAGGIE SMITH / Muriel Donnelly - “THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL” (Fox Searchlight)

Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture
ARGO, THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL, LES MISÉRABLES, LINCOLN, SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK

PRIMETIME TELEVISION

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries
KEVIN COSTNER / “Devil Anse” Hatfield - “HATFIELDS & McCOYS” (History)
WOODY HARRELSON / Steve Schmidt - “GAME CHANGE” (HBO)
ED HARRIS / John McCain - “GAME CHANGE” (HBO)
CLIVE OWEN / Ernest Hemingway - “HEMINGWAY & GELLHORN“ (HBO)
BILL PAXTON / Randall McCoy - “HATFIELDS & McCOYS” (History)

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries
NICOLE KIDMAN / Martha Gellhorn - “HEMINGWAY & GELLHORN” (HBO)
JULIANNE MOORE / Sarah Palin - “GAME CHANGE” (HBO)
CHARLOTTE RAMPLING / Eva Delectorskaya - “RESTLESS” (Sundance Channel)
SIGOURNEY WEAVER / Elaine Barrish Hammond - “POLITICAL ANIMALS” (USA)
ALFRE WOODARD / Ouiser - “STEEL MAGNOLIAS” (Lifetime)

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series
STEVE BUSCEMI / Enoch “Nucky” Thompson - “BOARDWALK EMPIRE” (HBO)
BRYAN CRANSTON / Walter White - “BREAKING BAD” (AMC)
JEFF DANIELS / Will McAvoy - “THE NEWSROOM” (HBO)
JON HAMM / Don Draper - “MAD MEN” (AMC)
DAMIAN LEWIS / Nicholas Brody - “HOMELAND” (Showtime)

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Drama Series
CLAIRE DANES / Carrie Mathison - “HOMELAND” (Showtime)
MICHELLE DOCKERY / Lady Mary Crawley - “DOWNTON ABBEY” (PBS)
JESSICA LANGE / Sister Jude - “AMERICAN HORROR STORY: ASYLUM” (FX)
JULIANNA MARGULIES / Alicia Florrick - “THE GOOD WIFE” (CBS)
MAGGIE SMITH / Violet, Dowager Countess of Grantham - “DOWNTON ABBEY” (PBS)

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series
ALEC BALDWIN / Jack Donaghy - “30 ROCK” (NBC)
TY BURRELL / Phil Dunphy - “MODERN FAMILY” (ABC)
LOUIS C.K. / Louie - “LOUIE” (FX)
JIM PARSONS / Sheldon Cooper - “THE BIG BANG THEORY” (CBS)
ERIC STONESTREET / Cameron Tucker - “MODERN FAMILY” (ABC)

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series
EDIE FALCO / Jackie Peyton - “NURSE JACKIE” (Showtime)
TINA FEY / Liz Lemon - “30 ROCK” (NBC)
AMY POEHLER / Leslie Knope - “PARKS AND RECREATION” (NBC)
SOFIA VERGARA / Gloria Delgado-Pritchett - “MODERN FAMILY” (ABC)
BETTY WHITE / Elka Ostrovsky - “HOT IN CLEVELAND” (TV Land)

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series
BOARDWALK EMPIRE, BREAKING BAD, DOWNTON ABBEY, HOMELAND, MAD MEN

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series
30 ROCK, THE BIG BANG THEORY, GLEE, MODERN FAMILY, NURSE JACKIE, THE OFFICE

LIFE ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

Screen Actors Guild 49th Annual Life Achievement Award
DICK VAN DYKE

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<![CDATA[Jenna Bush Hager: "I'm Pregnant"]]> Wed, 12 Dec 2012 10:06:54 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/Jenna_Bush_Hager.jpg

Jenna Bush Hager is expecting a baby in the spring.

The “Today” correspondent and daughter of former President George W. Bush revealed the good news Wednesday on NBC’s morning show.

“We’re so excited and obviously nervous about it. I’m a first time mom,” Bush said.

Henry Hager, Jenna’s husband of four years, dropped by the show with flowers for the reveal and said that the 31-year-old’s teaching background would help make her a great mom.

Jenna Bush Hager’s parents, who have been outspoken about wanting grandchildren, phoned into “Today” for the big announcement.

George W. Bush said he was “fired up” by his daughter's news and Laura Bush added she was “definitely” in favor of spoiling grandchildren.

During the phone call, Jenna referred to her father as "popsicle." The former president was asked what he would want his new grandchild to call him.

“Sir,” Bush deadpanned. 

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>