<![CDATA[NBC Southern California - ]]> Copyright 2014 http://www.nbclosangeles.com/feature/tracking-the-storm http://media.nbcbayarea.com/designimages/NBC4_40x125.png NBC Southern California http://www.nbclosangeles.com en-us Mon, 01 Sep 2014 19:42:43 -0700 Mon, 01 Sep 2014 19:42:43 -0700 NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[Storm Damaged Azusa Begins Cleanup]]> Tue, 04 Mar 2014 03:45:23 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/N6PPKGAZUSASTORMCLEANUPWEB_1200x675_180844611534.jpg The storms have moved on, but now the real job begins for some residents living in the foothills east of Los Angeles -- cleaning up the mess that Mother Nature left behind. Gordon Tokumatsu reports for NBC4 News from Azusa Monday, March 3,2014.]]> <![CDATA[After the Storm: Viewer Images]]> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 08:17:29 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/219*120/1a006886939143cc90f3c63bdd2779e1.JPG.jpg Viewer images of rainbows after the Southern California storms.

Photo Credit: Keith Pay]]>
<![CDATA[Tons of Mud Surrounds Foothill Home After SoCal Storms]]> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 16:45:22 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/217*120/storm-mud-azusa-cleanup.gif

Crews attempted to clear mud that piled up in the back yard of a home in the foothills east of Los Angeles as workers in a coastal community repaired a sinkhole left behind by the first significant storms to hit Southern California in months.

In Azusa, about 25 miles northeast of downtown Los Angeles, homeowners shoveled mud and debris from their foothill properties, many of which were under evacuation orders during the storms. Residents were allowed to return home just before noon Sunday.

City crews hauled about 200 tons of mud from the back of one property, where mud piled halfway up to the rim of a family's basketball hoop and built up around the home's foundation. Firefighters dug a trench to relieve some of the pressure on the foundation.

"When we first saw it, it was little heartbreaking," said homeowner Amanda Heinlein. "We shed a few tears.

"But then, it's been 24 hours and the change has been night and day."

The area is just below a hillside that burned in January's Colby fire. The Heileins said the situation probably would have been worse if not for a stand of avocado trees that prevented more mud from flowing down the hillside and into their back yard.

The 20-by-10-foot hole at Ventura Road at Hemlock Street in Oxnard was another reminder of the storms that began last week and continued to bring rain through Sunday. There were no reports of injuries of damage to vehicles, but traffic will be routed around the sinkhole until it is repaired.

In the Hollywood Hills, a mudslide blocked an entrance to homes and brought down a tree and power lines near Temple Hill Drive. Power was restored in the neighborhood.

Along the coast, storm-driven waves covered much of the mile-long Zuma Beach in Malibu with sand and kelp as water surged through a parking lot seawall. As the surf swelled over the Redondo Beach Pier Saturday night, The King  Harbor Yacht Club was evacuated and access to the area remained restricted.

Saturday's steady downpour dropped up to 6 inches of rain in downtown  Los Angeles and up to 3 inches in the coastal areas, but the storm that moved  in Thursday was said to be on its way out today, according to the National  Weather Service.

Expect dry conditions are warmer temperatures this week.

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<![CDATA[Azusa Residents Return Home After Mudslides]]> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 00:10:38 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/sunkumar61_1200x675_179428419926.jpg Residents forced to evacuate during a massive storm are finally returning after mudslides swept through the neighborhood. Reggie Kumar reports for the NBC4 News at 6 p.m. Sunday, March 2, 2014.]]> <![CDATA[Family Still Out of Azusa Home]]> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 00:10:39 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/sunkate61_1200x675_179436611538.jpg Though evacuation orders in Azusa were lifted, one family has been out of their home for four days as mud surrounded the home. Kate Larsen reports for the NBC4 News at 6 p.m. Sunday, March 2, 2014.]]> <![CDATA[Evacuation Orders Lifted in Glendora, Azusa]]> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 01:22:29 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/evacs-lifted+copy.jpg

Evacuation orders have been lifted in Glendora and neighboring Azusa after a strong storm system causing mud and debris flow passed through the region.

Flooding alert levels were lowered from red to yellow at 6 a.m. in the Colby fire burn area, according to a statement from the city.

Rain-parking restrictions were still in effect and residents were told to remove vehicles, trash bins, and any other objects from the streets. 

A thousand homes in Glendora were under evacuation orders since Friday morning. Officials had warned over the weekend that a lull in strong showers didn’t mean the storm had passed.

City Manager Chris Jeffers said stronger rain was expected to touch down on Saturday.

“The situation we deal with is that while we have these lulls and this sense of people thinking maybe it’s over, that’s not true,” Jeffers said. “We do expect more rain today.”

Rain picked up through the afternoon before tapering off in the night.

City engineers hoped to evaluate the hillsides for saturation levels and any stress the mountains have received.

Twenty-six homes in neighboring Azusa were also under evacuation orders until Sunday afternoon, when all but one were reopened to residents. One home was yellow-tagged due to damage caused by the mud and debris.

Evacuations were issued on Friday due to “unstable ground” as another storm passed Saturday.

The communities are nestled next to fire-scarred hills from January’s Colby fire.  

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<![CDATA[Mudslides Make Mess in Azusa]]> Sat, 01 Mar 2014 23:55:29 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/216*120/azusa+mudslide.JPG Backyards became moving mud pits in Azusa, where some residents stayed behind to battle the elements. Kate Larsen reports from Azusa for the NBC4 News at 8 p.m. on March 1, 2014.]]> <![CDATA[As Sky Clears, Tent Lifted From Oscar Red Carpet]]> Sat, 01 Mar 2014 23:55:29 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/changoscarpreps_1_1200x675_177627203622.jpg Even though a few scattered showers were still possible overnight, the tent was taken down from the Oscars red carpet Saturday night in the hope that once the stars arrive the next day, the pathway will be dry. Hetty Chang reports from Hollywood for the NBC4 News at 8 p.m. on March 1, 2014.]]> <![CDATA[Evacuations Still Apply, But Some Residents Remain]]> Sat, 01 Mar 2014 23:55:30 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/janeglendora_1200x675_177633347909.jpg Despite orders to leave amid fear of mud and debris flows, NBC4 found several Glendora residents willing to take the risk and stay home while a wild winter storm brought record rain to the region. Jane Yamamoto reports from Glendora for the NBC4 News at 8 p.m. on March 1, 2014.]]> <![CDATA[Caught on Camera: Deer Slogs Through Mud]]> Sun, 02 Mar 2014 11:39:53 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/muddydeerVO_1200x675_177625155899.jpg A herd encountered an unexpected obstacle while crossing to a field in Glendora, but a determined deer traversed the thick, muddy stream to reach the other side of an embankment. This report aired during the NBC4 News at 8 p.m. on March 1, 2014.]]> <![CDATA[Watch: Huge Wave Crashes Through Restaurant]]> Mon, 03 Mar 2014 10:33:52 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/santa+barbara+wave1.jpg

A winter storm sitting over Southern California churned up waves so powerful they crashed through a restaurant’s dining window and sent ocean water rushing toward diners Saturday morning.

Multiple patrons at Moby Dick Restaurant in Santa Barbara (map) captured the scary moments on camera, including Forrest Buchanan.

He was having breakfast and could see the large storm surf breaking on the pier, Buchanan said in a YouTube caption.

"The swell increased with every wave that passed. I recall telling people at the table in front of me, the pier will likely be closed soon due to the high surf," Buchanan said.

A minute later, that high surf came barreling toward diners. Videos from inside the restaurant show the wave swell then crash into the dining room, blowing out a window.

"The dining room was filled with the sound of glass shattering and people screaming as a wave of water rush over the dining room carpet," Buchanan wrote.

He said everyone, patrons and staff alike, froze then quickly evacuated before any more ocean water lapped at the restaurant.

"I then looked at the manager and asked, 'Do you mine (sic) I don't pay for my breakfast and move on?'" Buchanan wrote.

Jill Freeland was also in the restaurant Saturday morning.

Freeland said she and her family are avid surfers so they were excited to see the huge swells, but did not expect them to break the glass and send ocean water rushing toward them.

"High tide and big swell can make for some salty eggs!!" she said in a caption attached to a YouTube video of the incident.

Calls to Moby Dick for comment were not immediately returned Saturday afternoon.

Remarkably, there were no reports of injuries, according to a spokesman with the Santa Barbara County Office of Emergency Management.

Officials in Santa Barbara have closed the waterfront area, according to emergency manager Yolanda McGlinchey. Two boats have washed ashore and a pair of pilings was lost from Stearns Wharf as of early Saturday afternoon.

NBC4's Pablo Kay and Marla Fain contributed to this report.

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<![CDATA[Mandatory Evacuations Lifted in Monrovia]]> Sat, 01 Mar 2014 19:35:15 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/monrovia-evacs.jpg

Residents living in evacuated neighborhoods in Monrovia can return home Saturday evening, city officials said.

Mandatory evacuations were lifted at 6 p.m. and replaced with advisory evacuations for the foothills community, which was drenched with about 4.5 inches of rain in the past two days, Alexis Bakofsky, with the city of Monrovia, said.

The decision came after what was expected to be the last large cell of a powerful winter storm passed through the area. Officials said they were seeing clear water with very little mud and debris flowing off the hillsides in Monrocia.

"We appreciate the patience of our residents living in the affected areas and their vigilance to the mudflow concerns throughout the weekend and over the next week," Bakofsky said.

About 50 to 60 homes were affected by the evacuations near the Madison fire burn area on Friday.

Evacuations were ordered for the following areas affected by the 2013 fire:

  • Highland Place north of Hillcrest Boulevard
  • Scenic Drive
  • Loton
  • Heather Heights north of Scenic
  • Avocado Place
  • 600 block of Hillcrest Boulevard
  • 900 block of Crescent Drive

"We are advising residents located in the Madison Fire area to be aware that the potential for erosion and debris flowing down the mountain towards residential areas still exists," Bakofsky said.

Only residents living on Highland Place, one of the most affected areas by mud and debris flow, will be able to access that street Saturday night.

An evacuation shelter was set up at the Monrovia Community Center located at 119 West Palm Avenue. That evacuation center closed Saturday evening, but residents can still call 626-932-5550 overnight and someone will answer, the city said.

Evacuated pets were taken to the Pasadena Humane Society located at 361 S. Raymond Ave. free of charge.

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<![CDATA[Storm Not Expected to Help Long-Term Drought Problems]]> Sat, 01 Mar 2014 14:25:27 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/valley-rain-sat-storm.jpg

A storm system that has provided Southern California with much needed rain over the last few days will help state drought conditions in the short term, but weather officials aren’t convinced it will have lasting effects.

Mountains throughout the region were expected to see steady and moderate rain through Saturday night, but it still wouldn’t be enough to pull the state out of historically dry conditions, said National Weather Service meteorologist Scott Sukup in Oxnard.

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“It will help to green up some of the vegetation,” Sukup said. “[But] it’s not really going to do a whole lot in terms of improving the drought.”

The current rain system was expected to keep mountain areas saturated until May and June, when the weather gets warmer and moisture dissipates. No significant rain was forecast for the next week, officials said.

“It’s not looking too good for the rest of the year,” Sukup said.

Mandatory evacuations were in place in Azusa, Glendora and Monrovia. The foothill communities rest at the base of mountains damaged in recent wildfires and were being hit with mud and debris flow. 

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<![CDATA[LA River Rescue Called Off]]> Sat, 01 Mar 2014 21:01:01 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/riverrescuesat.jpg

A river rescue was called off Saturday morning after a jogger who reported seeing a car in the river actually saw a concrete barrier, officials said.

Firefighters responded to reports of a vehicle in the water near the 5 Freeway and Zoo Drive in the Los Feliz area.

Officials searched the area around 8 a.m. Aerial footage showed several Los Angeles City firefighters units in the area. 

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<![CDATA[Mudslides Force Closures in Lake Hughes ]]> Sat, 01 Mar 2014 06:00:45 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/180*120/mud+11.jpg

More than a dozen homes were evacuated and numerous roads were closed as flooding and mudslides brought on by a strong winter storm threatened Lake Hughes.

At least 13 homes south of Lake Hughes and Deeswood roads in Lake Hughes were under mandatory evacuations Friday night, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department Palmdale Station.

The area is vulnerable because of last June's Powerhouse fire.

Lake Hughes resident Vince Coscia and his friend Mark were out in the rain using a shovel to help divert water away from a friend's evacuated home Friday afternoon.

"We’re just up here doing a good deed," Coscia said.

The house belongs to an elderly couple who were forced to leave when the Sheriff's Department evacuated homes along Lake Hughes Road.

"I was just trying to save the house. The fire took everything ground cover so water won't stop," Coscia's friend Mark said.

A mudslide was blocking the road just north of Mendenhall County Juvenile camp on Lake Hughes Road, officials said.

NBC4's Kim Baldonado and photographer James Wulff were trapped between two mudslides for about an hour on Friday.

Road closures were in effect for:

  • Lake Elizabeth Road at Lake Hughes Road is impassable due to mudslides.
  • Bouquet Canyon Road is closed between Big Oaks Lodge and Vasquez Canyon Road.
  • Munz Ranch Road at Elizabeth Lake Road
  • Avenue T between Longview & 165th St E, in the Littlerock area due to flooded roadway

Soft closures (residents only):

  • Lake Elizabeth Road at Lake Hughes Elementary School
  • Pine Canyon Road at Sawmill Road



Photo Credit: Jeff Zimmerman, Zimmerman Media LLC]]>
<![CDATA[Downpours, Rough Seas Threaten Boats in Newport Harbor]]> Fri, 28 Feb 2014 21:40:35 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/N6PSOTVOOCWEATHERweb_1200x675_175933507511.jpg Harbor Patrol officials in Newport Beach spent Friday searching for damaged boats as rain, winds, and fierce waves pummeled vessels in the harbor. Vikki Vargas reports from Newport Beach for the NBC4 News at 6 p.m. on Feb. 28, 2014.]]> <![CDATA[Tornado Warning Issued Overnight, More Storm Warnings]]> Sat, 01 Mar 2014 10:43:40 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/180*120/01-gettystorm.jpg

A Pacific storm continued to bring rain to Southern California Saturday, with conditions so severe in one area that the National Weather Service issued a tornado warning early Saturday.

"We are still looking at a very active weather day," NBC4 meteorologist Elita Loresca said. "I’d advise folks near the burn areas and just overall should remain vigilant and aware of flooding and mud in their areas. Don’t try to drive through these areas!"

A tornado warning was in effect from 3:19 a.m. to 4 a.m. for East Central Los Angeles County near Azusa and Pomona after the National Weather Service noticed a severe thunderstorm in the area capable of producing a tornado. No damage was reported.

A flash flood warning has been issued for the Madre, Colby, Madison and Williams burn areas of Los Angeles County until 8 a.m. Saturday. As of 6 a.m., the Doppler radar indicated very heavy rain moving into the burn areas, according to the NWS. Over one half inch per hour have been reported in nearby areas, which “will likely produce flash flooding and mud and debris flows in and around the burn areas.”

'Expected rain totals today aren’t going to be as much as yesterday, but still enough to cause problems, especially with the threat of thunderstorms," Loresca said Saturday morning. "Coasts and valleys should expect one to two inches, foothills and mountains should expect two to four inches of rain."

A Pacific storm Friday brought rain, thunder, and winds, wreaking havoc on Southern Californians who haven't seen anything like it in years.

About 1 to 2 inches of rain fell in much of the Los Angeles basin by Friday morning, with about 3 to 5 inches dousing mountain areas.

Snow levels were down to 5,500 feet by Saturday morning.

High surf lashed the Southern California coast and mudslides slammed foothill communities.

A high surf advisory is in effect until 5 p.m. Sunday.

A flash flood watch is in effect until 8 p.m. Saturday for Los Angeles County mountains, foothill areas coastal areas and valleys, as well as for Catalina Island.

A coastal flood advisory is in effect between 6 a.m. and noon Saturday and from 4 a.m. Saturday until 4 a.m. Monday for Orange County beaches.

There's a chance of showers and thunderstorms all day Saturday and into the night with temperatures in the 50s..

Sunday, it could be mostly cloudy with a chance of showers in the morning, then a slight chance of showers in the afternoon.

Temperatures could reach around 60.

A winter storm warning is in effect for big LA County mountains until 3 a.m. Sunday.

A high wind warning is in effect until 6 a.m. Saturday in the Coachella Valley. Winds of 15 to 25 mph with gusts up to 45 mph are expected, with the strongest expected over higher terrain, according to the NWS.

The strongest storm to hit Southern California in about three years soaked much of the area with heavy rain Friday.

The storm sent waves of mud and debris cascading down recently burned mountainsides.

The weather forced evacuations and prompted school closures.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Flash Flood Warnings Issued Through LA County]]> Fri, 28 Feb 2014 22:50:37 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/180*120/AP311501353414_2.jpg

A flash flood warning was in effect for parts of Los Angeles County through Friday night as heavy rains poured into the region.

The National Weather Service issued a flash flood warning for Tujunga, Sunland, Lake View Terrace, La Crescenta, La Canada Flintridge, Burbank and Beverly Hills until 8:45 p.m.

The constant stream of heavy rains will cause urban flash flooding, and the affected roadways include portions of the 210, 5, 405 and 170 freeways, as well as canyon roads from the San Fernando Valley to Beverly Hills and West Hollywood.

Flooding forced an hour-long closure of the connector road from the southbound Pasadena (110) Freeway to the northbound Hollywood (101) Freeway near downtown Los Angeles, according to the California Highway Patrol. The roadway reopened just before 9 p.m.

Anyone in a warning area was urged to move to higher ground immediately, according to the NWS.

Residents along streams or creeks should take immediate precautions to protect pets and property.



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Snow Arrives in Big Bear]]> Sat, 01 Mar 2014 14:31:16 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/207*120/bigbearboulder.jpg

After a day of frustration Friday, snow covered Big Bear late Friday and early Saturday, with almost a foot of snow on the ground by Saturday morning.

"This is just awesome. This is the storm that we've been waiting for all season long," Chris Riddle of Big Bear Mountain Resorts said.

NBC4 Meteorologist was in Big Bear early Saturday and reported that nine inches of snow were on the slopes. She added that Highway 18 was still closed as of 7:45 a.m.

Wind and rain ripped through Big Bear on Friday morning, knocking down signs, stripping away layers of snow, and prompting resorts and highways to close, Bear Mountain officials said Friday in a statement posted on their website and Facebook.

Resort officials said they plan to Snow Summt and Bear Mountain Saturday at 8 a.m.

The first wave of an aggressive -- but much-needed -- storm system hit the area Wednesday and Thursday.

The storms brought more than an inch of rain to Big Bear and other drought-stricken SoCal communities.

Snowgoers had been looking forward to a nice dose of winter for the weekend.

"This is really sad,” Bear Mountain ski instructor Christine Gallo said. “I’ve never seen them close on a rainy day.”

With talk of snow, Bear Mountain officials earlier in the week had encouraged patrons to come for the weekend: “100% chance of snow Friday night and Saturday. Call your pow buddies and get up here for some freshies!”

Small amounts of slushy snow began to fall in the afternoon.

Roads were opening up after travelers were met with obstacles in the form of rock slides and highway closures on two of the major mountain routes leading to resorts.

Motorists hoping to hit the slopes this weekend were encouraged to dress accordingly, carry snow chains and drive cautiously.



Photo Credit: NBC4]]>
<![CDATA[Evacuations in "Unstable" Azusa Neighborhood]]> Sat, 01 Mar 2014 10:38:42 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/212*120/azusahouseflood.jpg

Twenty six homes in Azusa were under mandatory evacuations as the second of two winter storms pummeled Southern California.

The Los Angeles County Fire Department and Azusa Police Department ordered all residents and media to evacuate Ridge View Drive about 4:30 p.m. Friday. Officials said the order was due to "unstable ground" as storms headed toward the neighborhood.

Anyone in the area was instructed to keep roadways clear for emergency personnel and to completely avoid the area.

"Anytime you have a mandatory evacuation, stress and anxiety does come into play. And so we understand that and we appreciate that. It’s not something we look forward to," Glendora City Manager Chris Jeffers said.

Some residents on Ridge View Drive, however, refused to leave.

"The worry is that the rocks and pebbles and stuff might come down like the Malibu Rock slide, but I don't think it'll come down. I think it'll just be a lot of debris and water," resident Daniel Poblet said.

Aerial video showed the backyard of a home flooded with muddy water.

An unidentified journalist was briefly stuck in the mud in Azusa Friday.

"He couldn't get out of the mud, got stuck. He had to have five people help him out," homeowner Dennis Sanderson said. Sanderson had also opted not to evacuated as of Friday night. "We’ll probably leave. But um, taking it hour by hour."

Earlier Friday afternoon, police and fire officials urged residents below the fire-scarred hillsides above Glendora and Azusa to prepare for mudslides that swept the area's streets.

A thousand homes in Glendora were under evacuation orders. As of Friday night, two homes in Glendora had been slightly damaged by mud flow, according to an NBC4 report.

Evacuations were also issued for the foothill community of Monrovia as a strong storm brought flooding concerns to the area. 

The storm also knocked out power to tens of thousands of people across Southern California.

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<![CDATA[Flooding Shuts Down Sepulveda Basin]]> Fri, 28 Feb 2014 16:37:39 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/DetourGenericGetty_1121.jpg

Heavy rains have flooded the Sepulveda Basin, a major San Fernando Valley route near the convergence of two of the most congested freeways in Southern California.

Officials shut down the route (map) Friday around 6 a.m., and are expecting stretches of the area to remain off-limits until Monday, as a second storm pummels the region.

LAPD Officer Bruce Borihanh said the area reached "critical levels."

Officials issued a road closure advisory, which affected the following routes:

  • Eastbound Burbank Boulevard to Balboa Boulevard
  • Hayvenhurst Avenue to Burbank Boulevard
  • Westbound Burbank Boulevard from San Diego (405) Freeway
  • Southbound Woodley Avenue to Victory Boulevard

Authorities said they had no estimate for when the roads would reopen. Weather forecasters predict rainfall and thunder continuing through the weekend.

“They’ll open the roads whenever it’s safe,” Borihanh said. “Public safety is our number one concern.”

Authorities are asking drivers to steer clear of the affected streets.

LAPD has dispatched patrol units to monitor the closed roads, and barricades have been set up to enforce the closures, Borihanh said.

As of Friday afternoon there had been no reports of crashes or other obstructions in the basin area.

The first of back-to-back West Coast storms hit Thursday, giving a majority of communities in drought-stricken California just over one inch of rain.

Friday's heavier second wave has brought significant downpours to SoCal areas such as downtown Los Angeles, Glendora, Azusa, Van Nuys and Monrovia, among others.

Many residents were left without power, and some were forced to evacuate Friday.

A man and his dogs also had to be rescued earlier in the morning after facing some trouble with the Los Angeles River, which has picked up quick-moving currents thanks to the weather conditions.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Day 2 of Heavy Showers in SoCal]]> Fri, 28 Feb 2014 13:44:22 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/180*120/AP311501353414_2.jpg An aggressive winter storm system pounded Southern California on Friday, causing some to lose power and others to evacuate their homes.

Photo Credit: ASSOCIATED PRESS]]>
<![CDATA[Power Slowly Restored for Thousands in LA]]> Sun, 02 Mar 2014 11:43:39 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/160*120/GLENDORA-MUD-9.jpg

Thousands of customers without power for hours as crews tried to fix downed power lines snapped by a strong winter storm had their electricity restored late Saturday, but some were still in the dark on Sunday.

About 5,400 Southern California Edison customers were without power as 9 a.m. on Sunday morning.

Heavy rainfall caused outages from Winnetka to Bel Air to Echo Park, according to the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. 

The utility reported about 200 customers were without power Sunday morning. According to the DWP, the areas affected were San Pedro and Hollywood.

Natural gas services were not being affected by the storm, but Southern California Gas Company officials warned residents not to proactively turn gas meters off.  Customers who smell gas odor or suspect a leak were advised to call 911. 

Because of the rain, the LA Department of Parks of Recreation is shutting off its sprinklers for the next 10 days and are urging homeowners to do the same until the storm passes.



Photo Credit: Facebook/Glendora Police Department]]>
<![CDATA[Man, 2 Dogs Rescued From LA River]]> Fri, 28 Feb 2014 14:47:47 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/212*120/dog-rescue-la-river-feb28.jpg

At least one person and two dogs were rescued from the Los Angeles River as a storm pounded Southern California Friday morning.

Aerial video showed rescue workers trying to get to the male and two dogs on a tree at the base of the river. A boat was being used to get the victim and two dogs out. 

The incident was reported in the Cypress Park area in the 1500 block of North San Fernando Road, according to the Los Angeles Fire Department. One of the men told NBC4 he went into the water to save his dogs.

"The water is moving pretty quick, and it will fool you," said Los Angeles Fire Lt. Mark Akahosai

An animal services vehicle also responded to the location.

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<![CDATA[Rain Sends Mud Sliding Into Streets ]]> Fri, 28 Feb 2014 10:46:15 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/160*120/glendora-mud-8.JPG A strong winter storm system is hammering Southern California, and heavy rain is causing some mud and debris flow to the foothills community of Glendora and other problems throughout the Southland. ]]> <![CDATA[Storms Slam "Notorious" Lytle Creek Area]]> Sat, 01 Mar 2014 05:44:16 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/217*120/lytle-creek-flooding.jpg

The San Bernardino County Fire Department had six strike teams ready to go overnight in case roads or homes began showing signs of flooding in the flood-prone area of Lytle Creek Friday night.

Specially trained swiftwater rescue personnel were deployed to the area early Friday as steady rains raised the threat of overflowing creeks and mudslides.

In Lytle Creek (map), about 60 miles northeast of Los Angeles, flooding and rockslides developed early Friday as the region received its first significant rainfall in months. Teams of specially trained rescuers were deployed in the area, where past storms have led to floods and fire-rescue responses.

"Lytle Creek is notorious," said Chris Prater, of the San Bernardino County Fire Department. "There's a creek that runs through town. Not only the creek, but the roads have been notorious for flooding."

The creek is rushing with water for the first time this season.

"You can hear the rumble of the rocks going through, so it's changed dramatically," Lytle Creek resident Jared Smith said.

Smith braved the storm Friday night to go to the town's only bar. In year's past, rain had washed out parts of the road, leaving residents trapped.

"We run into issues when we get debris such as logs, large boulders that clog it up. When that happens, the water can't flow out like it's supposed to and then you start to flood our neighborhoods," a fire official told NBC4's Kate Larsen.

Water collected in several backyards in the foothill community in Angeles National Forest. A pothole that developed overnight on the southbound 15 Freeway near Kenwood Road caused tire damage to several vehicles.

The storm exceeded expectations of many residents.

"We're going to get flooded," a resident told NBC4. "If somebody walked over there you'd go, 'Whoop,' right down."

In neighboring Devore, small rocks tumbled from saturated hillsides onto roads.

Heavy flooding also was reported near the mountain town of Wrightwood, prompting several road closures.

Forecasts called for the storm to last through Saturday, bringing some relief amid a long-running drought, and to spread east into similarly parched neighboring states. California's rain totals are far below normal and it will take a series of drenching storms to make a dent in a statewide drought that is among the worst in recent history.

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<![CDATA[Glendora Police: Evacuate Before It's Too Late]]> Fri, 28 Feb 2014 19:32:27 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/mudflow-glendora-toni+copy.jpg

Mud and debris flows blocked intersections and forced road closures in parts of a Southern California foothill neighborhood under a mandatory evacuation as a strong winter storm slammed the region.

READ: 1,000 Homes Evacuated Ahead of Second Storm

Officers in the San Gabriel Valley foothill community of Glendora reported mudflow at North Ben Lomond Avenue and Hicrest Croad, just below a fire-scarred hillside that burned in January's Colby fire. Mud flowed down a couple hundred yards from Yucca Ridge down to Hicrest, a city engineer said.

Nearly two inches of rain fell in the area over a 24 hour period that ended Friday at mid-day.

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The threat of mudslides from rain-saturated hillsides that burned during the Colby fire prompted officials in Glendora and Azusa to declare mandatory evacuations. But not everybody elected to leave the area early Friday.

"Once that mud starts flowing, it can be too late to get out," said Glendora Police Chief Tim Staab. "There is nothing you can do once that mud starts flowing."

A resident living on Ridgeview Drive watched was still at his home on Friday morning as mud began flowing on his property.

"We're ready to leave," he said. "All of the mountain problem and the mud is coming down on this street here."

Another resident, Eric Hirst, watched the mudflow near his home.

“The more mud I see, the more worried I’m going to be,” Hirst said.

Significant flooding was closing eastbound traffic on Sierra Madre Avenue near the mudflow between McNeil Drive and Barranca Avenue, according to the Azusa Police Department. Mudflow onto residential properties also was reported in Azusa.

A tractor could be seen on the affected street scooping up water and mud from the flooding.

Flash flood warnings were in effect Friday as weather officials braced for periods of heavy rains and possible thunderstorms through Saturday night.

Mail delivery was suspended in the evacuated area, but residents are able to pick up mail at Glendora and Azusa Post Offices during normal business hours with valid photo identification.

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<![CDATA[AM Traffic: Crashes Slow Morning Drive]]> Fri, 28 Feb 2014 10:26:00 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/downtown-la-cloud-rain.jpg

Traffic problems plagued a widespread area of Southern California as the second significant storm system of the week moved into the region.

Flooding was reported on several streets and at least two big rig crashes blocked major freeways at the start of a rainy day that includes flood advisories for much of the region.

AM Traffic Updates

  • Downtown LA: Eastbound 10 Freeway lanes blocked because of crash at Santa Fe Avenue.
  • Chatsworth: Crash on westbound 118 Freeway was cleared at about 6 a.m.
  • Glendale: Lanes on the northbound 5 Freeway at Western Avenue were closed because of a big rig crash. Lanes reopened at about 9 a.m.
  • La Crescenta: Eastbound 210 Freeway lanes are closed because of a big rig crash.
  • Malibu: A nine-mile stretch of Pacific Coast Highway is closed because of the landslide threat.
  • West San Fernando Valley: The Sepulveda Basin is closed because of high water levels. Road closures include eastbound Burbank-Balboa, Hayvenhurst-Burbank, westbound Burbank from 405, and wouthbound Woodley-Victory
  • Willowbrook: Overturned SUV blocking lanes on the eastbound 105 Freeway.

Refresh this page and check the NBCLA Traffic Page for updates.

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<![CDATA[Portion of Pacific Coast Highway Reopens]]> Sat, 01 Mar 2014 17:03:13 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/219*120/rock-malibu-pch-feb28.jpg

A 9-mile stretch of Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu was closed Thursday night and into Friday as a strong winter storm settles over Southern California, according to the California Highway Patrol.

This week’s second storm – a respite for the drought-stricken region – is expected to pack a stronger punch than a quick-moving cell that brought a splash of rain on Wednesday.

Anticipated rock- and mudslides caused by heavy rain prompted CHP to close the iconic coastal roadway between Yerba Buena and Las Posas roads. Hillsides above that portion of PCH burned in last year’s Springs Fire, which scorched 24,000 acres of land near Camarillo Springs, Newbury Park and Cal State Channel Islands.

The closure was extended early Friday morning as small rocks tumbled down the hillside. Electronic billboards warned drivers to avoid PCH, but the road reopened at mid-day.

A spokeswoman for CHP told NBC4 damage from the fire was so severe, officials "expect the mountain to come down."

Only residents with proof of identification will be allowed into the closed area.

Meteorologists have posted flood watches for many other areas denuded by fires over the past two years, including the foothills in Glendora scorched by the Colby Fire. The National Weather Service warned of possible rainfall rates of 1 to 2 inches an hour as well as waterspouts offshore and small tornados when the next storm moves through the state Friday.

As many as 5 inches of rain could fall in some areas, and up to 3 feet of snow may blanket areas above 6,000 feet, NBC4 meteorologist Byron Miranda said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.



Photo Credit: RMG]]>
<![CDATA[Residents Consider Fleeing Amid Mudslide Danger]]> Thu, 27 Feb 2014 22:01:49 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/N5PPKGAZUSASTORMweb_1200x675_174261315634.jpg An evacuation order is in effect in parts of Azusa and Glendora amid worries about possible mudslides in burn areas from January's Colby Fire. Residents say their main concern is protecting their homes. Patrick Healy reports from Azusa for the NBC4 News at 5 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014.]]> <![CDATA[SoCal Mountains Could See Fresh Snow]]> Fri, 28 Feb 2014 02:40:20 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/268*120/mountainmud.JPG

After rain Wednesday, the second of back-to-back storms is expected to dump a "potent punch" of up to 3 feet of powder starting Friday on SoCal's mountains.

Possibly a foot of snow could fall at elevations as low as 5,500 feet Friday night, forecasters said. Areas above 7,000 feet could see as much as 3 feet of snow, according to the National Weather Service.

As of Friday morning, snow levels were above 10,000 feet, according to the National Weather Service.

The wind is also a major aspect of this week's storms.

A high wind watch will be in effect in the Antelope Valley from late Thursday through Friday evening.

The first of two storms hit on Wednesday in parched Southern California.

The storm that arrived Wednesday night dropped 1.07 inches of rain in downtown Los Angeles by 9 a.m., and just under an inch at Los Angeles International Airport, according to the National Weather Service. About a half-inch fell in Van Nuys, while Newhall had more than an inch, Pasadena had an
inch and Mount Wilson had 1.2 inches.

Wednesday's precipitation brought snow to such Northern California ski resorts as Lake Tahoe and Mammoth, while Southern California resorts only saw ice and mud.

In the past few weeks conditions on Mountain High in the Angeles National Forest have been so warm that employees have been unable to create snow, forcing the resort to close for periods at a time.

But the possibility of fresh white stuff blanketing SoCal mountains was a welcome sign. Bear Mountain officials were encouraging folks to drive up.

“Looks like a bit of winter is heading our way for Friday and Saturday,” Bear Mountain officials said on a statement posted on their website. “Plan on driving up Friday so you can enjoy some freshies Saturday morning!”

While Snow Summit is closed Thursday due to wind and weather, it will re-open early Friday in anticipation for some snow.

City News Service contributed to this report.

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<![CDATA[#TrackingtheStorm: Your SoCal Storm Images]]> Sun, 02 Mar 2014 15:17:52 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/a09e469bd922450a8a151eeee69e4799.jpg NBC4 viewers sent us photos as two storms rolled into the parched region, setting up SoCal for the most rainfall its seen in the last three years.]]> <![CDATA[Second SoCal Storm to Pack More Punch]]> Thu, 27 Feb 2014 14:20:32 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/227*120/ap-AP596862884812+copy.jpg

A calm between two back-to-back winter storms allowed residents in foothill communities to continue with flood protection measures as a more powerful system surged toward drought-stricken Southern California.

About one inch of rain fell in downtown Los Angeles by early Thursday as the storm system moved along the coast from Northern California. Some parts of the region received more rain overnight than the total since July 1, marking the start of what the National Weather Service called the "largest rain event" in Southern California since March 2011.

Most Southern California communities have seen just over one inch of rain since July 1, but Ventura received 1.47 inches overnight. In Venice Beach, 1.02 inches of rain dropped overnight and about 1.50 inches fell in foothill and mountain communities during a one-two punch of winter storms that might bring more rain through the weekend.

Some of the heaviest rainfall overnight was reported northwest of Los Angeles in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties.

The break between storms Thursday will include a few hours of clear skies before the more powerful of the two systems arrives Thursday evening and into the overnight hours. That storm might bring up to 2 inches of rain in central and southern valleys, 2 to 4 inches in foothill areas and 6 inches of rain in some mountains.

Isolated thunderstorms are possible as part of a system that could lead to problems during the Friday morning drive.

Gusty south-to-southwest winds will buffet mountain areas, especially "over higher terrain,"  the National Weather Service advisory said. Snow and wind could affect travel along the Grapevine section of the 5 Freeway north of Los Angeles. The conditions could lead to closures along the major north-south route through central California.

A wind advisory will be in effect in Los Angeles County in the San  Gabriel Mountains and the Antelope Valley from noon today until 9 p.m.  Thursday, the NWS said, forecasting south-to-southwest winds of between 20 and  30 miles per hour and gusts of between 45 and 55 mph this afternoon.

Several freeway crashes and spinouts were reported early Thursday, including a multiple-big rig crash on the 210 Freeway that closed the freeway as crews removed the wreckage.

Flood Threat in San Gabriel Valley Communities

Voluntary evacuations are in effect for the San Gabriel Valley foothill communities of Azusa and Glendora. The neighborhoods are below an area that burned during the Colby fire in January, forcing residents to stack sandbags around their properties for protection from possible mudslides and debris flows as the rain saturates hillsides.

The city of Glendora issued an Orange Level alert Wednesday for residents in the burn area, meaning voluntary evacuations are in effect. Residents are directed to remove vehicles, trash bins and other obstructions from streets prior to evacuating.

The city could issue a Red Level alert, which includes mandatory evacuations. Officials planned to meet Thursday morning to discuss the weather forecast.

Voluntary evacuation orders were issued Wednesday night in Azusa along Ridge View Drive.

Evacuated residents of Azusa and Glendora residents can go  to the Crowther Teen & Family Center located at 241 W. Dawson Ave

Glendora Mountain Road will be closed Thursday morning through noon Monday.

Crews placed concrete barriers along several streets in Glendora, a community of about 50,000 people. More than 18,000 sandbags -- enough to cover four miles if placed end to end --  were been distributed to residents to protect properties from floods and debris flow.

The National Weather Service also warned of the potential for mud and debris flows from the burn area of the May 2013 Springs Fire. The wildfire scorched nearly 38 square miles of the Santa Monica Mountains as it burned from the edges of suburban homes down to the beach about 50 miles west of downtown Los Angeles.

Other wildfires statewide left scarred landscapes over the past year, including a 400-square-mile area devastated by last summer's forest fire in and adjacent to Yosemite National Park in the Sierra Nevada.

Storms Arrive Amid Dry Spell

As for the drought impact, the effects could be more significant than moisture left by a storm earlier this month. That so-called Pineapple Express storm brought rain and snow to Northern California and increased the Sierra Nevada snowpack, but it still remained at 29 percent of normal.

Sierra snow runoff provides a major source of water for California.

Only very small amounts of precipitation reached Southern California, making this week's weather the first major event of the year. Downtown Los Angeles has recorded only 0.23 inch of rain this month, 3.05 inches below normal to date.

The location has received only 1.23 inches since July 1, a deficit of 9.52 inches.



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Rain Hits SoCal in First of Back-to-Back Storms]]> Thu, 27 Feb 2014 12:36:48 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/236*120/raindamagedtruck.JPG The first of two storms descended upon Southern California Wednesday, a welcome sign for many after the state experienced the driest year on record in 2013.

Photo Credit: Newsreel HD]]>
<![CDATA[Second Storm Causes 1,000 Home Evacuations]]> Fri, 28 Feb 2014 08:38:40 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/AZUSA-RAIN-MUD.jpg

Mandatory evacuations are still in effect for the San Gabriel Valley foothill communities of Glendora and Azusa as a strong storm system pounds parts of Southern California.

Despite sunny blue skies behind the first storm, mandatory evacuation orders were issued Thursday for about 1,000 homes in two of Los Angeles' eastern foothill suburbs beneath nearly 2,000 acres of steep mountain slopes left bare by a January fire.

Flash flood warnings were in effect Friday as weather officials braced for periods of heavy rains and possible thunderstorms through Saturday night.

The neighborhood was burned in January’s Colby fire, forcing residents to stack sandbags around their properties for protection from possible mudslides and debris flows as the rain moistens the hillsides.

Azusa police made the decision for evacuations after speaking with National Weather Service representatives and city officials. Hard street closures were placed in effect  and city officials urged residents to leave early on Thursday.

"Make final preparations to secure their homes, get their personal items in order and leave as quickly as possible," Glendora City Manager Chris Jeffers said.

Some residents, however, have decided to stay put, despite the evacuation orders.

“I think (the city has) done a great job preparing,” Glendora resident Dale Ellsworth said.

Ellsworth's grandmother was living in Glendora during a 1969 stom in which lives were lost and 30 homes were destroyed.

"Those were longer floods, longer rains and heavier rains. We didn't have sandbags, there was nothing we just played it by ear. Helped each other,” Doreen Ellsworth said of the 1969 mud flows.

As of Thursday night, the city of Glendora was out of sandbags but more are expected to arrive Friday morning. The city also has engineered drainage ponds and emergency k rails in place.

"The city learned a tremendous lesson, they really did," Doreen Ellsworth said.

An evacuation center was set up at the Crowther Teen & Family Center located at 241 W. Dawson Ave.

Extra officers were going to be patrolling the affected neighborhood to prevent criminal activity while residents were away from their home.

In Ventura County, the threat of a strong weather system was placing firefighters on high alert in areas affected by last year's Spring fire, which burned 24,000 acres of land near Camarillo Springs, Newbury Park and Cal State Channel Islands. 

Mike Lindbery, spokesman for the Ventura County Fire Department, warned that the burned areas could be susceptible to mudslides and flooding.

"If you start getting water flowing into your structure, don’t hesitate. Call 911," Lindbery said.

While concern was highest in the Glendora-Azusa area, meteorologists also posted flood watches for many other areas denuded by fires over the past two years. The National Weather Service warned of possible rainfall rates of 1 to 2 inches an hour as well as waterspouts offshore and small tornados when the next storm moves through the state Friday.

California's precipitation totals are far below normal and it will take a series of drenching storms to make a dent in a statewide drought that is among the worst in recent history.

The state Department of Water Resources took a new survey of the Sierra Nevada snowpack and found the water content at only 24 percent of average for the date. The northern and central Sierra snowpack normally provides about a third of the water used by California's cities and farms.

The Associated Press and NBC4's Jonathan Lloyd contributed with this report.

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<![CDATA[Hello, Rain: Where to Welcome the Wet Stuff]]> Thu, 27 Feb 2014 11:00:48 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/219*120/Pool_82399035.jpg

Uttered the words "cozy" or "snug" or "storm" or "puddle" lately? Probably not, but we will guess that you've said "tanning butter" and "SPF" and "sweaty" and "sunburn" with frequency.

We've had quite the toasty winter, you might have heard, with days regularly flirting with the high 80s, and even 90, and nights that aren't as frosty-as-breath as one expects from wintertime.

But the breath frost is returning, and the tanning butter? It shall be stowed. Several days of rain are in the forecast, which means we all may need a reminder of where one goes to play when small droplets of H2O emerge from overhead precipitation-bearing clouds.

Snug up during the rainy weekend at...

A Fireside Spot: The Griffin is plenty nook-like, with a fireside scene to boot, as is its neighbor up Los Feliz Boulevard, Bigfoot Lodge. Want to go for a swanky rustic scene? Book Sunday brunch at Saddle Peak Lodge in Calabasas, and see if you can score a fire-close table. And for pure poshness, do drinks, crackle-close, at West Hollywood's own RivaBella.

A Free Museum: The Hammer Museum in Westwood just ditched its admission earlier this month, meaning a day spent admiring paintings is zilcho dollars. Well, parking below the museum still costs, but you won't need to walk into the elements to get inside. Not squishing in your shoes past the great works of art? That's a bonus.

A Ghost Tour: Serious question here, and we're not joshing: Can a spooky movie be made without showing heavy skies and foggy moors and rain, rain, rain? Where are all the sunshiny ghost stories? If the wet stuff gets you in a supernatural mood, the Queen Mary has plenty of walk-down-shadowy-halls tours going. By night, of course.

A Movie Marathon: Screening all of the Best Picture nominees just hours ahead of the Oscars? It's an AMC Theaters tradition. If the soggy weather hits on Saturday, March 1 keep in mind that select AMC venues will show all nine of those nominees, back-to-back-to-back. Your only chance of getting soaked is if you spill your soda during a surprise twist, so, good news there.

A Snow Day: You've likely heard the rumor that rain, if it gets cold enough, becomes snow. Spoiler alert: It's completely true, and if you haven't gotten some sufficient sledding and snowball throwing in yet, you can check out Big Bear Snow Play. The name says it all: You'll mitten up and frolic in the white stuff. 

Remember the white stuff? And rain? Welcome back, wet times. Please stay for a few days, this go around. We've missed ya awfully.

With a few days left until the wet storm arrives, you can track all the weather changes on the FREE NBC4 Weather app. It's complete with extended and hourly forecasts, extreme weather alerts, a radar map and videos from your favorite NBC4 weathercasters.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Break Between Storms]]> Thu, 27 Feb 2014 09:35:31 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/webcrystalfeb27_1200x675_173262403769.jpg Thursday marks a break between two winter storms. Crystal Egger has the forecast for Thursday Feb. 27, 2014.]]> <![CDATA[Rain Drops on SoCal as Storm Hits]]> Thu, 27 Feb 2014 02:58:37 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/160*120/kidshovelsklemack.jpg

Rain moved into Southern California, marking the start of what is expected to be three days of significant rainfall.

Download NBCLA's FREE Weather App | Photos: Preparing for Rain | Send Us Your Weather Photos

Rain was reported in Burbank, Glendora and Ventura County about 8 p.m Wednesday.

By 1 a.m. Thursday, rain was reported throughout the Southland, including in Sherman Oaks, Westchester and Fullerton.

The rain provides a welcome respite from the prolonged dry spell but also brings the threat of flooding, landslides, traffic tangles and other problems.

According to the CHP website, 30 traffic incidents were reported between 10:30 p.m. Wednesday and 2 a.m. Thursday in the LA area.

SoCal Storm Resources

Law enforcement agencies around the region were bracing for the storms.

Deputies in Lancaster and Palmdale were on a heightened state of alert.

The potential for mudslides in the Green Valley and Elizabeth Lake areas are extremely high due to recent wildfires.

Just a small amount of rainfall on a burned area can lead to flash floods and debris flow.

Such rushing waters coupled with soil and rock can destroy bridges, roadways, structures and cause serious injury or death, Wolfe says.

Residents in foothill neighborhoods under the threat of mudslides and flooding surrounded homes with sandbags this week as communities prepared for what the National Weather Service described as the "largest rain event" in Southern California since March 2011.

In Glendora, more than 18,000 sandbags -- enough to cover four miles if placed end to end -- have been distributed to residents to protect properties from floods and debris flow.

The heaviest rain was expected after the evening commute and into the overnight hours.

The more powerful of the two storms was expected to arrive Thursday evening and bring up to 2 inches of rain in central and southern valleys, 2 to 4 inches in foothill areas and 6 inches of rain in some mountains.

The National Weather Service described it as the most significant storm in the last three years in Southern California, adding that thunderstorms are possible Friday and Saturday. Showers could continue into early Sunday.



Photo Credit: Robert Kovacik/NBCLA]]>
<![CDATA[Glendora Takes Action as Rain Makes Landfall]]> Thu, 27 Feb 2014 01:00:56 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/11pkovacikrain_1200x675_172730435857.jpg As rain moved into the foothill community of Glendora, residents worked together to prepare for rain and anticipated mudslides. Robert Kovacik reports for the NBC4 News at 11 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014.]]> <![CDATA[SoCal Storm Resources 2014]]> Sat, 01 Mar 2014 16:45:01 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/200*120/sandbags-glendora-weather.jpg

Below are tips to prepare for the pending storms, broken down by cities and regions in Southern California likely affected by possible mudslides.

Photos: Preparing for Rain | Send Us Your Weather Photos

Track the storms' progress and get the latest SoCal weather wherever you are, with NBC4's free weather app. Click here to download.

Azusa

  • Officials have imposed mandatory evacuations for Azusa. An evacuation center has been established at the Crowther Center at 241 W. Dawson Avenue in Glendora. The phone number to the center is 626-914-2357.

Beverly Hills

  • The city has sandbags available to residents. The City can provide sandbags to residents (10 per household) with proof of City residency; valid ID or a utility bill matching ID. For information, call (310) 285-2467 or after hours, 310-550-4951.

Burbank

  • Public Works Department is providing sandbags to residents and business owners.
  • Pickup at Public Works Field Services Yard: 124 South Lake St., Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Public Works Field Services Yard can be reached at (818) 238-3800.
  • Residents along Country Club Drive north of Via Montana are advised not to park cars on or next to the street, which is designed to carry storm water to the County's lower debris basin.
  • Residents in the surrounding hillsides of Burbank are encouraged to prepare for this onslaught of rain and possible mud/debris by clearing rain gutters and drains.
  • If you live on a hillside and need additional support with sandbags, please respond to Burbank City Yards on Lake Street, show proof of residency, and pick up additional sand bags.

Glendale

  • Glendale Fire Department stations have been supplied with burlap bags that are available to the public for free (sand not provided)
  • Up to 10 additional sandbags, per household, will be available from the City of Glendale Public Works yard at 541 W. Chevy Chase Dr., (818) 548-3950.

Glendora

  • To date, 18,000 sandbags have been distributed. Residents can pick up sandbags at the City Yard at 440 S. Loraine Ave. 24/7.
  • Hard closures in the Colby Fire burn area went into effect Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014, at 8:15 p.m. No one will be allowed to return to the area until further notice.
  • City went on "orange alert," Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014, at 8 a.m.
  • A perimeter of 100 homes in the Colby Fire burn area (this includes properties north of Sierra Madre between the western city boundaries of Azusa/Glendora (Yucca Ridge) to the eastern boundary of properties on the west side of the Little Dalton Wash, near Loraine Avenue) were placed under a voluntary evacuation order Wednesday.
  • Residents that are part of the voluntary evacuation are directed to remove vehicles, trash bins, other obstructions from streets and/or travel lanes prior to evacuating as they will be subject to tow or removal by authorities.
  • Evacuees will be directed to the Evacuation Center: 241 W. Dawson Ave. Glendora, CA 91740.
  • Residents electing not to evacuate will be asked to sign a Refusal to Evacuate Form.

Monrovia

  • Mandatory evacuation order for those living below the area where the Madison Fire scorched the Hillside 10 months ago
  • An evacuation shelter has been set up at the Monrovia Community Center at 119 W. Palm Ave.

Long Beach

  • Sand and Sandbags available at the Public Works/Public Service yard located at 1651 San Francisco Ave., Long Beach, CA 90813. Also at any fire station.
  • KKJZ 88.1 FM will broadcast information related to the Long Beach Community.

Los Angeles City

  • Empty sandbags and sand are available at all Los Angeles Fire Department stations, although the department will not fill or deliver them.

Los Angeles County

  • Department of Parks and Recreation sandbagging flood-prone park areas, lifeguards on standby for deployment into areas where rain may create fast-moving water
  • Free sandbags available at any County Fire Station
  • Department of Animal Care and Control can house dogs, cats and reptiles that need to be temporarily relocated at the Inland Valley Humane Society in Pomona. Horses and other large animals can be housed at Cal Poly Pomona.
  • Residents can call 2-1-1 for LA County information and referral services regarding post disaster resources that are available to affected persons.

Pasadena

  • Sandbags available at two fire stations. Station 37: 3430 E. Foothill Blvd and Station 38: 1150 Linda Vista Ave.
  • Residents and businesses with power issues can call Pasadena Water and Power at 626-744-4673 and for water-related emergencies at 626-744-4138.
  • City is reminding the public to clear debris and overgrowth from drainage channels and rain gutters before the rain starts, keep cars fueled/charged and to keep a disaster kit updated with flashlights and extra batteries.

Santa Clarita

  • Problem areas during rainy seasons such as Placerita Canyon, Calla Lilly, Sierra Highway near Beales’ Cut, Soledad Canyon Road.
  • City Public Works dispatch at 661-294-2520, from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays, and for after-hours storm related emergencies, please call the Sheriff’s dispatch at 661-255-1121.

Seal Beach

  • Sandbags can be obtained at the Seal Beach Lifegaurd Headquarters at 888 Ocean Ave. , Seal Beach, CA 90740. Additional sandbags are at Landing and Seal Beach boulevards, Arbor Park and Fire Stations 44 & 48.
  • City’s Marine Safety Department is expecting high surf between 10 to 12 feet midday Saturday and high tide Saturday morning.
  • Questions may be referred to the City of Seal Beach Marine Safety Department at 562-431-2527, ext 1202.

If you see downed power lines in the city of Los Angeles, call LADWP at 1-800-342-5397. For those outside of LA, call Southern California Edison at 1-200-677-1911 to report any power outages.

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<![CDATA[Snow Summit Readies for SoCal Storm]]> Thu, 27 Feb 2014 01:00:58 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/11pshinsnow_1200x675_172726851917.jpg As the first of two storms rolled into Southern California, Snow Summit was readying for fresh powder to land on the grounds. Tony Shin reports for the NBC4 News at 11 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014.]]> <![CDATA[Rain Soaks Ventura]]> Thu, 27 Feb 2014 01:00:58 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/11pgadiventurarain_1200x675_172732483506.jpg Southern California storms have arrived, and rain was dousing Ventura as residents welcomed showers to the parched area. Gadi Schwartz reports for the NBC4 News at 11 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014.]]> <![CDATA[Glendora Prepares for Possible Mudslides]]> Wed, 26 Feb 2014 21:35:30 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/N5PPKGGLENDORAPREPSweb_1200x675_172390979898.jpg As a storm system approached Southern California, Glendora residents were preparing for possible mudslides in the areas impacted by the Colby Fire in January. Kim Baldonado reports from Glendora for the NBC4 News at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014.]]> <![CDATA[Storms Expected to Bring Snow Relief to Big Bear]]> Wed, 26 Feb 2014 21:42:41 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/N5PPKGBIGBEARPREPSweb_1200x675_172431939526.jpg Usually a top destination for mountain-goers during winter, Big Bear hasn t been its snowy self this year. But the arrival of a pair of cold, wet storms headed for Southern California is expected to change that. Tony Shin reports from Snow Summit for the NBC4 News at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014.]]> <![CDATA[Hollywood Braces for Pair of Rain Storms]]> Wed, 26 Feb 2014 21:35:58 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/N5PPKGLASTORMPREPSweb_1200x675_172395075978.jpg Known for its flood-prone streets, officials are taking no chances in Hollywood, which is expected to get hit especially hard by a pair of approaching storms. Ted Chen reports from Hollywood for the NBC4 News at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014.]]> <![CDATA[Long Beach Watching Flood Danger as Storms Approach]]> Wed, 26 Feb 2014 21:55:50 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/N6PPKGLONGBEACHPREPSweb_1200x675_172438595967.jpg City workers and residents are taking to steps to prevent flooding in Long Beach as the area prepares for heavy rainfall from a pair of approaching storms. Hetty Chang reports from Long Beach for the NBC4 News at Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014.]]> <![CDATA["Largest Rain Event" in 3 Years Surges Toward SoCal]]> Thu, 27 Feb 2014 07:17:17 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/200*120/sandbags-glendora-weather.jpg

Residents in foothill neighborhoods under the threat of mudslides and flooding surrounded homes with sandbags this week as communities prepared for what the National Weather Service described as the "largest rain event" in Southern California since March 2011.

The one-two punch of storms bring the possibility of mudslides in areas burned by wildfires, but also much-needed rain  and snow after the state's driest year on record.

In Glendora, more than 18,000 sandbags -- enough to cover four miles if placed end to end -- have been distributed to residents to protect properties from floods and debris flow. Flash flooding is possible in some foothill areas below burn areas, including the hills that burned in January's Colby fire above the San Gabriel Valley community.

"There's going to be so much rain in just a couple of days that a lot of areas might not be able to handle that much rain," said NBC4 meteorologist Crystal Egger. "It just runs downhill like a concrete driveway."

Two storms will usher moisture into the region, moving down from Northern California Wednesday morning before bringing about a half-inch to an inch of rain to Southern California.

The heaviest rain Wednesday is expected after the evening commute and into the overnight hours. The more powerful of the two storms will arrive Thursday evening and bring up to 2 inches of rain in central and southern valleys, 2 to 4 inches in foothill areas and 6 inches of rain in some mountains.

The National Weather Service described it as the most significant storm in the last three years in Southern California, adding that thunderstorms are possible Friday and Saturday. Showers could continue into early Sunday.

The city of Glendora issued an Orange Level alert for residents in the burn area, meaning voluntary evacuations are in effect. Residents are directed to remove vehicles, trash bins and other obstructions from streets prior to evacuating.

The city's evacuation center is at the Crowther Teen & Family Center located at 241 W. Dawson Ave.
Residents who do not evacuate will be asked to sign a Refusal to Evacuate form, indicated they understand the risk involved.

"The alert level was raised to orange from yellow due to the Weather Forecasts and the field conditions within the foothills of Glendora," according to a city advisory.

The city could issue a Red Level alert, which includes mandatory evacuations. 

Glendora Mountain Road will be closed Thursday morning through noon Monday.

Crews placed concrete barriers along several streets in Glendora, a San Gabriel Valley community of about 50,000 people. The city provided sandbags for residents at fire stations, and more than 7,000 had been handed out, City Manager Chris Jeffers told the San Gabriel Valley Tribune Tuesday.
 
The National Weather Service also warned of the potential for mud and debris flows from the burn area of the May 2013 Springs Fire. The wildfire scorched nearly 38 square miles of the Santa Monica Mountains as it burned from the edges of suburban homes down to the beach about 50 miles west of downtown Los Angeles.

Other wildfires statewide left scarred landscapes over the past year, including a 400-square-mile area devastated by last summer's forest fire in and adjacent to Yosemite National Park in the Sierra Nevada.

The snow level will remain high -- above 7,500 feet during daytime  hours, dipping to around 6,500 feet tonight and Thursday -- and gusty south-to- southwest winds will buffet mountain areas, especially "over higher terrain,"  the National Weather Service advisory said.

A wind advisory will be in effect in Los Angeles County in the San  Gabriel Mountains and the Antelope Valley from noon today until 9 p.m.  Thursday, the NWS said, forecasting south-to-southwest winds of between 20 and  30 miles per hour and gusts of between 45 and 55 mph this afternoon.

Storms Arrive Amid Dry Spell

As for the drought impact, the effects could be more significant than moisture left by a storm earlier this month. That so-called Pineapple Express storm brought rain and snow to Northern California and increased the Sierra Nevada snowpack, but it still remained at 29 percent of normal.

Sierra snow runoff provides a major source of water for California.

Only very small amounts of precipitation reached Southern California, making this week's weather the first major event of the year. Downtown Los Angeles has recorded only 0.23 inch of rain this month, 3.05 inches below normal to date.

The location has received only 1.23 inches since July 1, a deficit of 9.52 inches.
 

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<![CDATA[Dramatic Southern California Rain Photos]]> Wed, 26 Feb 2014 15:33:21 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/192*120/moreno+valley+mud.jpg Rain is expected to hit SoCal hard this week. Check out these photos to see the impact of past storms. ]]> <![CDATA[Watch: Timelapse of LA's Much-Needed Storm]]> Wed, 26 Feb 2014 15:33:21 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/WXTIMELINEFORWEB_1200x675_171892291567.jpg This timelapse video shot by NBC4's downtown Los Angeles camera on Feb. 26, 2014, shows the first of two winter storms rolling into the region.]]> <![CDATA[Storm Warnings in Homeless Encampments]]> Wed, 26 Feb 2014 15:33:21 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/214*120/homeless-riverside-storm.jpg Authorities warned people in the encampments of the upcoming storms. Jacob Rascon reports for the NBC4 News at Noon on Wednesday Feb. 26, 2014.]]>