Coyote Pup’s Brother Treated for Burns

The brother of a little coyote burned in the Poinsettia Fire is being treated for the same injuries, but more severe

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    NEWSLETTERS

    The little coyote pup badly burned in Carlsbad’s Poinsettia Fire now has a familiar face to keep her company as she recovers in Ramona.

    The pup’s brother was taken to the Fund for Animals Wildlife Center (FFAWC) just days after the first coyote was admitted.

    Both received severe burns to their feet as they fled the wildfire that scorched 600 acres, but after receiving treatment from the center’s Dr. Jane Meier, they are on the mend.

    FFAWC Director Ali Crumpacker said the female pup’s feet are healing so well that the bandages were taken off so she could stretch her toes. As long as she doesn’t touch her paws, the bandages could stay off.

    Coyote Pup Burned in Poinsettia Fire

    [DGO] Coyote Pup Burned in Poinsettia Fire
    A furry fire victim gets some much needed veterinary care after being burned in the recent wildfires. NBC 7's Vanessa Herrera reports.

    However, the male pup had significantly worse burns to the pads of his feet, meaning he has a longer road to recovery, Crumpacker said. He lost all but one toenail because of the burns. The vets expect they will not grow back.

    At roughly three pounds, the pup has half of his sister’s weight, so vets assume he is the runt of the litter.

    This week, Meier thoroughly cleaned the little guy’s paws, applying antibiotic salve and bandages. Crumpacker said he is eating well and taking his medications, but they are concerned that the blisters on the coyote’s toes could become infected.

    Until he and his sister are cleared from infection, they will stay separated in the ICU ward.

    The FFAWC has housed the pups side by side so they can at least hear and smell each other.

    According to Crumpacker, the pups’ feet will be cleaned and checked every few days for at least three to five weeks until the skin has regrown.

    At that point, they’ll be put into an outdoor enclosure to help them get used to the great outdoors again.