‘Ho-Hum’ Bandit Pleads Guilty to San Diego Bank Robbery Spree

Adam Lynch, 34, admitted to robbing seven banks in San Diego County during a 2010 spree

By Monica Garske
|  Wednesday, Jan 29, 2014  |  Updated 4:18 PM PDT
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Bank Bandit Wears Bronzer, Wig: Witnesses

FBI

Adam Lynch -- aka the "Ho-Hum Bandit -- during one of his many humdrum heists.

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A serial bank robber known as the “Ho-Hum Bandit” pleaded guilty Tuesday to a string of bank robberies that took place in San Diego County in 2010.

Adam Lynch, 34 – known for his reportedly nonchalant, unassuming manner of robbing banks – admitted to committing seven bank robberies in San Diego between Feb. 27, 2010, and Jun. 5, 2010, the office of U.S. Attorney Laura E. Duffy confirmed.

During his spree, he even robbed the same bank branch twice within just one week.

According to the FBI, Lynch’s modus operandi was almost always the same: he would enter a bank, walk up to the counter, pass a note to a teller, say he was armed and demand cash.

After getting what he wanted, the bland bandit would flee the scene. He never injured anyone in the humdrum heists.

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Investigators say Lynch’s San Diego bank robberies weren’t his last.

Prosecutors say Lynch also robbed several banks in Denver in August 2010, December 2010 and March 2011. The Ho-Hum Bandit also struck at a bank in Cheyenne, Wyo., in November 2010.

At one point, the FBI suspected Lynch was responsible for at least 16 bank robberies.

Lynch’s crime career came to an end in April 2011 when he was arrested by authorities. He’s been in custody ever since.

In April 2013, Lynch was sentenced to more than five years in prison for those robberies in Denver and Wyoming.

His sentencing for the San Diego bank robberies is set for Apr. 28, according to prosecutors. If convicted on all charges, Lynch faces a maximum of 20 years in prison, plus a $250,000 fine, three years of supervised release, restitution and a $100 special assessment.

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