Man Accused of 'Revenge Porn' Will Stand Trial

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    A proposed California law would make it illegal for anyone to post nude images online without the person’s permission. Senate Bill 255 targets cyber revenge, also known as revenge porn, which is typically distributed after a bitter break-up.

    A man accused of posting sexually explicit images of women to a website to extort them for money will go to trial on 31 felony counts, a judge said Monday.

    Kevin Bollaert had a five-day preliminary hearing in a San Diego courtroom, facing felony counts of conspiracy, identity theft and extortion. Afterward, Judge David Gill decided enough evidence existed for Bollaert to move forward to trial.

    The 27-year-old will be arraigned on the charges on July 16.

    Bollaert had argued he wasn’t guilty because he simply received the images from the women’s ex-boyfriends.

    But 16 women claim Bollaert took their photos, posted them to the website YouGotPosted.com and then asked them to pay hundreds of dollars to have the pictures removed.

    Investigators say Bollaert posted more than 10,000 sexually explicit photos of women on YouGotPosted.com.

    According to an arrest warrant, he then created ChangeMyReputation.com, where he allegedly charged the women $300 to $350 have their pictures removed from YouGotPosted.com.

    According to investigators, Bollaert made $900 a month off advertising on his websites and thousands more from women desperate to have their pictures removed.

    Both websites have been shut down.

    The so-called “revenge porn” case is the first of its kind, filed by state Attorney General Kamala Harris.

    There is now a California law that prohibits posting identifiable nude photos online after a breakup, punishable with a $1,000 fine or six months in jail.