FDA Approves Breakthrough Drug That Fights Deadly Skin Cancer

According to the American Cancer Society, although melanoma only accounts for less than 2 percent of all skin cancer cases, it causes the majority of skin cancer deaths.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    A new skin cancer drug -- Keytruda -- may make a difference for many people who might have otherwise died. Dr. Bruce Hensel has one man's story for Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014. (Published Thursday, Sep 4, 2014)

    The FDA approved a new drug Thursday that could change the way melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, is treated.

    The drug, Keytruda, was considered a breakthrough and approved after it was tested on more than 600 patients who had melanoma spread throughout their bodies.

    "I was on oxygen. I was in a wheel chair. I couldn't walk. I didn't eat. I was thinking, I didn't have much longer to go," said melanoma patient Tom Stutz of Sherman Oaks, who was part of a clinical trial at UCLA.

    According to the American Cancer Society, although melanoma only accounts for less than 2 percent of all skin cancer cases, it causes the majority of skin cancer deaths.

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    Melanoma cells protect themselves with a special protein called PD-1. This protein prevents the immune system from recognizing and killing the cancer cells.

    The Keytruda drug is an antibody that targets the proteins. Without being guarded by the protein, the immune system has a greater chance of attacking the cancer cells.

    "It's important because it's a new tool that is going to be very powerful in designing future regiments for melanoma," said Dr. John Glaspy of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    The drug uses the body’s own immune system which means it likely has fewer side effects and more benefits than some regular chemotherapy.

    "We have long believed that harnessing the power of our own immune systems would dramatically alter cancer treatment," said Judith Gasson of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

    Seventy-two percent of patients involved in the study responded to the drug and experienced tumor shrinkage. More than one-third of the patients had tumors that shrunk more than 30 percent and did not re-grow.

    The treatment is given intravenously every three weeks. It is unclear how long patients have to stay on the medicine.

    Stutz, who in June 2011 had melanoma that had spread to his lung, liver and other parts of his body, currently experiences no signs of the cancer.

    "The bottom line is it saved my life. I would not have been here were it not for that drug," Stutz said.

    Statistics show approximately 76,100 new cases of melanoma will be diagnosed in the U.S. in 2014 and nearly 10,000 Americans will die from the disease this year.