Hope for Children with Peanut Allergies: Study

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Getty Images/OJO Images RF
    Close up of bowl full of peanuts

    Peanut allergies, no more?

    Well, not just yet. But researchers found that feeding small amounts of peanut flour to allergic children may lessen negative reactions.

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    A large clinical trial gathered children between seven and 16 years old who are sensitive to peanuts. The children ate tiny amounts of the nut and increased intake over time.

    Most children with peanut allergies of any severity received a meaningful increase in consumption, according to a study published in health journal The Lancet.

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    Researchers found that more than 80-percent of trial’s participants were able to eat roughly five peanuts after six months of oral immunotherapy.

    Quality of life improved for those who were able to increase their peanut intake, but researchers warned that the findings should not be tested at home.  

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