Intersection Fifth and Flower Streets Would Be Ray Bradbury Square Under Proposal

The pioneering science fiction writer, who often wrote stories at the Central Library near the intersection where he would be honored, died June 5 at age 91.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    An excerpt from Bryant Gumbel's interview with author Ray Bradbury, 40 years after the publication of Bradbury's 1953 novel "Fahrenheit 451." (Published Tuesday, Sep 11, 2012)

    A plan to honor the late science fiction writer Ray Bradbury by naming a major downtown intersection after him was set for a vote Sept. 18 by the Los Angeles City Council.

    The corner of Fifth and Flower Streets, where the city’s famed Central Library sits, would become Ray Bradbury Square under the motion by Councilman Jose Huizar.

    Bradbury, who died June 5 at age 91, was a fixture around Los Angeles for decades, appearing frequently to speak and read his works at area schools and libraries.

    He spent considerable time at the Central Library, and in the days before computers wrote many of his stories on its public typewriters. He often dined nearby, meeting with other writers at Clifton’s Cafeteria on Broadway, Huizar said in his motion.

    “As a long time Los Angeles resident, Mr. Bradbury had a special connection to downtown,” Huizar wrote. “He drew from the rich milieu of characters populating Los Angeles to fill the fantastic, imagined worlds of his literature.”

    Over his long life, Bradbury wrote dozens of books, plays, short stories and television episodes. Among his most famous efforts were “The Martian Chronicles,” “The Illustrated Man,” and “Fahrenheit 451.”

    Last month, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) named the location where the Mars rover Curiosity touched down after the writer, calling the location Bradbury Landing.
     

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