Malibu HS Tests Show Carcinogen Levels Above EPA Limit

A majority of the samples showed normal levels, but a few tested beyond the legal limit

By Christina Cocca
|  Friday, Nov 22, 2013  |  Updated 6:43 PM PDT
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Parents react to news that some caulk samples contained PCB levels above legal limits set by the Environmental Protection Agency, officials said.. Toni Guinyard reports for the NBC4 News at Noon on Friday Nov. 22, 2013

Khalid Shabazz

Parents react to news that some caulk samples contained PCB levels above legal limits set by the Environmental Protection Agency, officials said.. Toni Guinyard reports for the NBC4 News at Noon on Friday Nov. 22, 2013

Tests of carcinogen levels at Malibu High School revealed Thursday that some caulk samples contained PCB levels above legal limits set by the Environmental Protection Agency, officials said.

Statement: Santa Monica Malibu Unified School District

The majority of the samples came back with levels below regulatory limits, but a "few" of the samples showed results higher than the EPA standard, Seth Jacobsen of the Santa Monica Malibu Environment Task Force told NBC4 Thursday.

Despite only a few samples testing for higher levels, the EPA will step in given that any of the samples tested over federal limits to investigate and assemble a plan with the school district to move forward.

The EPA maintains that the school is safe for children to attend after Thursday’s test results.

After three teachers at the school were recently diagnosed with thyroid cancer, staff, parents and students demanded the school testing for carcinogens.

Three teachers who worked in that building recently have been diagnosed with thyroid cancer, three more educators have thyroid problems, and others report suffering from migraines and skin rashes.

Preliminary environmental tests done on the school in October ruled out mold as a health hazard, the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District said

The tests were conducted with regard to mold only and represents the first step taken by the district in response to concerns that there may be carcinogens on campus, which houses a high school and middle school.

Parents and educators demanded more comprehensive tests, including on campus soil, to determine whether contaminants are causing illnesses.

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