Metro's New App Lets Riders Report Crimes and Problems Directly

LA Metro Transit Watch is available for iPhone and Android devices

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    NEWSLETTERS

    A new mobile app aims to make Metro buses and trains safer and more secure. If a commuter sees any suspicious activity, they can simply take a picture and it is instantly downloaded to the Sheriff’s dispatch center. Michelle Valles reports from North Hollywood for the NBC4 News at 6p.m. on June 26, 2013. (Published Wednesday, Jun 26, 2013)

    A new app for mobile phones designed to help increase safety on Metro buses and trains will allow passengers to report crimes and suspicious activity.

    The smartphone app was released Wednesday by the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transit Authority. It uses the now-familiar "See Something" and "Say Something" language.

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    LA Metro Transit Watch is available for iPhone and Android devices from the Apple Store and Google Play store.

    “With this new smartphone app, if anyone wants to report graffiti, if an elevator or escalator is not operating correctly, or if a person needs assistance, it can be reported securely and anonymously,” Metro CEO Art Leahy said. “Metro remains committed to providing the region with safe, clean, reliable and convenient public transit service.”

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    Metro cautioned on its blog The Source that transit users who need to report a serious crime or emergency should call 911 first, or use emergency phones in Metro Rail stations.

    App users can be connected by phone to the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Dispatch Center or send a photograph via email where deputies and other professional staff receive it and respond appropriately.

    Metro officials noted that while there is no cell phone or Wi-Fi service in its subway tunnels, the agency is hoping to partner with a provider in the next year to provide service on the Red and Purple lines.
     

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