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Napa Residents Pick Up the Pieces After Quake

A day after a magnitude-6.0 earthquake jolted residents awake, the community of Napa was assessing the damage left by the temblor and working to get the town out from under the rubble.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Homeowners in Napa are now looking to rebuild their homes after violent shaking from a 6.0-magnitude earthquake severely damaged their homes, including dozens that are now red-tagged. Carolyn Johnson reports from Napa for the NBC4 News at 11 on Monday, Aug. 25, 2014.

    A day after a magnitude-6.0 earthquake jolted residents awake, the community of Napa was assessing the damage left by the temblor and working to get the town out from under the rubble.

    More than 90 homes in the tight-knit community have been red-tagged, leaving residents wondering what to do.

    "Unfortunately, it will be red-tagged and that's why I made sure that the power is disconnected before my neighbors got their power on because the house was lifted," Rudy Garcia said outside his home. "In a scenario like that I don't know what the wires in the walls would be pinched or some sort, so I didn't want to have a fire start out."

    Landmark Church Red-Tagged After Destructive Bay Area Quake

    [LA] Landmark Church Red-Tagged After Destructive Bay Area Quake
    One of the structures red-tagged after a destructive 6.0-magnitude earthquake that jolted the Bay Area is a 93-year-old landmark Baptist church. Patrick Healy reports from Vallejo on the for the NBC4 News at 11 on Monday, Aug. 25, 2014

    Garcia said he is still staying on the property until officials ask him to leave, despite broken walls, a crumbled porch roof and the lack of services.

    He said he is just happy that his father, daughter and dogs were not injured by the temblor, the largest in the state in 25 years.

    Quake Leaves Homes, Residents in Precarious State

    [LA] Quake Leaves Homes, Residents in Precarious State
    A day after a magnitude 6.1 earthquake shook the Bay Area, red tape, crumbling buildings and drone video are offering residents a preview of what promises to be a long and challenging recovery effort. Carolyn Johnson reports from Napa for the NBC4 News at 3 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 25, 2014.

    By Monday, less than 100 residents were without power, utility company PG&E reported. Many more than that still lacked water, however, with more than 90 water main breaks reported.

    The Red Cross has set up a shelter in the historic downtown, still littered with debris from fallen bricks and broken windows. It said 239 people came to seek services Sunday, but just 8 families stayed overnight. Many were able to stay with friends and family.

    Schools are expected to reopen Tuesday.

    Of the injured, local hospitals said many were discharged Monday, with many suffering broken bones from falling debris.

    The most seriously injured, 13-year-old Nick Dillon, underwent 10 hours of surgery at U.C. Davis Medical Center in Sacramento after suffering a broken pelvis when a brick chimney collapsed on his back.

    His aunt said Tuesday he is expected to make a full recovery, but won't be able to stand on his legs for four to five months.

    "He's just really energetic and really full of life and he's just going to need all the support and prayers people can send his way," Carmen Rosales said Tuesday.

    The town is also exploring options for funding to help local residents recover. An estimated 6 percent of homeowners in the area have earthquake insurance, and many say they'll need help as the repairs begin.

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