Coverage of a series of shooting deaths involving a fired LAPD officer's revenge plot

Most Recent Photos of Christopher Dorner Released by Irvine Police

Dorner set off a regionwide manhunt after he allegedly killed the daughter of an LAPD captain, her fiancé, and a Riverside police officer.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Irvine Police Department
    These photos of Christopher Dorner were taken on Jan. 28, 2013, at an Orange County hotel, according to Irvine police. Days after these pictures were captured, Dorner allegedly began a revenge-motivated shooting spree, sparking a region-wide manhunt for the former LAPD officer.

    New photos were released Friday of a former LAPD officer wanted in connection with an allegedly revenge-motivated shooting spree that has killed three people, including a Riverside police officer and an LAPD captain's daughter.

    They are the most recent images detectives have of the man who prompted a region-wide manhunt, according to Lt. Julia Engen, spokeswoman for Irvine police.

    Released by the Irvine Police Department, one of the photos shows Christopher Dorner looking directly into the security camera.

    The pictures were taken on Jan. 28 at an Orange County hotel. Police would not say which hotel’s surveillance cameras captured the photos.

    Nearly a week after these photos were taken, Dorner allegedly gunned down the daughter of an LAPD captain and her fiancé inside their car on the top floor of their apartment parking garage in Irvine.

    Monica Quan, 28, and Keith Lawrence, 27, were found slumped over in their car on Feb. 3. An autopsy revealed the pair died from multiple gunshot wounds.

    The shooting spree allegedly continued on Thursday, when Dorner is suspected of ambushing two Riverside police officers, killing one of them and seriously injuring the other.

    Also on Thursday, LAPD officers working a protection detail as part of the case were shot and wounded in Corona. One officer was grazed by a bullet in the head and has since been released from the hospital.

    Police asked the media not to identify the targeted law enforcement in order to protect the officers and their families.

    In an 11,000-word document he posted on his Facebook page this week, Dorner apparently implicated himself in the slayings and promised more violence, police said.

    "I know I will be villified (sic) by the LAPD and the media," Dorner writes. "Unfortunately, this is a necessary evil that I do not enjoy but must partake and complete for substantial change to occur within the LAPD and reclaim my name."

    Dorner used the manifesto to recount his firing and declare his innocence. He was fired from the LAPD in 2008, after reporting another officer for alleged brutality – an accusation that investigators later said was false.