Magnitude 3.4 Earthquake Shakes Southern Los Angeles County - NBC Southern California
Earthquakes

Earthquakes

Information and resources for Southern California

Magnitude 3.4 Earthquake Shakes Southern Los Angeles County

Refresh this page for updates on this developing story.

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    No damage was reported from a magnitude 3.4 earthquake felt mostly in LA's South Bay and Orange County. Ted Chen reports from Carson for NBC4's News at Noon on Thursday, April 30, 2015. (Published Thursday, April 30, 2015)

    A small earthquake shook a widespread part of the Los Angeles area Thursday morning, the US Geological Survey reported.

    Weak shaking was reported in Carson, LA, the South Bay, Pomona, Orange County and other nearby communities from the 7:01 a.m. tremor, measured as a 3.4 magnitude earthquake, the USGS said.

    The USGS initially reported the quake as a magnitude 3.6, briefly upgraded it to a 3.7, then later downgraded the activity to a 3.4. It struck at a depth of about 7.5 miles, two miles from Carson.

    "I was dead asleep and felt a big jolt. It woke me right up," Carson resident Lori Vidal said.

    What to Do in an Earthquake

    [LA] What to Do in an Earthquake
    When an earthquake hits, there's a lot of conflicting advice on how to be prepared. Here's what the government and experts at Caltech say to do. Investigative reporter Joel Grover reports for the NBC4 News at 5 p.m. on Monday, March 17, 2014.
    (Published Thursday, March 20, 2014)

    The Los Angeles County Fire Department and Sheriff's Department had not received any reports of damage by 7:14 a.m. The earthquake caused short delays on Metro Los Angeles trains, the agency tweeted, but full service was restored before 7:30 p.m. after a systemwide inspection turned up no damage.

    The quake was near the Newport-Inglewood Fault Zone, which includes the communities of Culver City, Inglewood, Compton, Long Beach, Huntington Beach, Newport Beach and Costa Mesa. The fault also extends southeast into the ocean.

    In 1933, the magnitude-6.4 Long Beach Earthquake that resulted in 120 deaths and more than $50 million in property damage was in the fault zone, according to the Southern California Earthquake Data Center. Most of the damage was to unreinforced masonry buildings.

    NBC4's Ted Chen contributed to this report.

    Follow NBCLA for the latest LA news, events and entertainment:iPhone/iPad App | Facebook| Twitter | Google+ | Instagram | RSS | Email Alerts