Coverage of the deadly June 7 shootings in Santa Monica

Santa Monica Shootings Prompt New Plan to Quell Youth Violence

A new plan to address youth violence was the subject of a press conference Tuesday in Santa Monica, 11 days after a shooting rampage

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Flowers, candles and other items on the Santa Monica College campus.

    Santa Monica city and school officials announced a new approach to youth and family violence in the wake of a shooting rampage in which six people died.

    The plan, Cradle to Career is a holistic approach to a the violence problem involving city and school and college officials and more than 40 community groups.

    "Cradle to Career as a group is looking to solve an entrenched problem that the events of last week are a reminder of," said Jonathan Mooney, a Cradle to Career consultant.

    Full Coverage: Rampage in Santa Monica

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    After a deadly mass shooting that raged through the Santa Monica, an unrelated, fatal gang-related shooting occurred nearby, community members took to the streets on Sunday to call for peace. Tena Ezzeddine reports for NBC4 News at 6 p.m. on Sunday, June 16, 2013.

    A 23-year-old gunman killed his father and brother June 7 before fatally shooting three others after a domestic dispute and fire at a Santa Monica home.

    The gunman, John Zawahri, was killed by police officers during a gunbattle at the Santa Monica College library.

    The shooting occurred the same day President Barack Obama was in Santa Monica for a fundraiser.

    Sandra Lyon, superintendent of the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District, called for action from the whole community in the fight against violence and mental illness.

    “What we’re talking about is a societal issue, a community issue, and it’s an issue that’s going to take a collective approach to support students in need and families in need,” Lyon said.

    In addition to preventing the national issue of gun violence, the initiative aims to remind the public of the need for mental health services and the counseling for people 18 and older.

    Cradle to Career aims to "replace the school-to-prison pipeline," Mooney said.

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