About Those Lakers Tickets...

A spokeswoman for the mayor says he "voluntarily initiated contact" for a possible review

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    Courtside seats at Lakers games have raised eyebrows of some people in Los Angeles.

    The Los Angeles Ethics Commission may review the  mayor's acceptance of dozens of free tickets to concerts and sporting events  since 2005 to make sure he did not violate rules for accepting gifts.      

    The Los Angeles Times reported late Tuesday night that Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa "voluntarily initiated contact" with the city Ethics Commission and City Attorney for a possible review, according to a spokeswoman for the mayor. 

    State and city laws require politicians to report gifts they receive,  and accept no more than $420 worth of gifts or tickets from any one source in a  year. But under state law, politicians are not required to report getting free  tickets to events where they have a "ceremonial" or official role, the Los  Angeles Times reported.

    Staffers in the mayor's office were working to document what Villaraigosa's  "official" or ceremonial role was at each of 81 events he was scheduled to  attend.

    In a televised interview in May after sitting courtside at a Lakers  game, where tickets generally run $3,100, the mayor acknowledged getting his  ticket for free but said he  performed an official duty. Over the past five years, Villaraigosa has attended 13 Lakers games,  often sitting courtside, and 12 Dodgers games. He's also attended the Academy  Awards, the Emmy Awards and Grammy Awards.

    Last week, KTTV FOX 11 News reported Villaraigosa had attended Lakers playoff games and sat in the front row with his girlfriend, KTLA general assignment reporter Lu Parker.  KTTV FOX 11 reported the mayor had not properly reported the free tickets.

    Villaraigosa maintained he did nothing wrong and that the free tickets feel under the banner of city mayoral duties.