Renderings Show Climate Change Effects on Venice Beach

The pictures show a comparison of today's Venice Beach with what the popular tourist destination would look like completely submerged underwater

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    NEWSLETTERS

    According to a group of climate scientists, rising sea levels caused by climate change could affect LA’s own Venice Beach as well as a number of prominent U.S. landmarks. Mekahlo Medina reports from Venice for the NBC4 News at 6 on Tuesday, May 20, 2014. (Published Tuesday, May 20, 2014)

    New visual renderings show what the threat of climate change could mean for Southern California.

    The pictures show a comparison of today's Venice Beach with what the popular tourist destination would look like completely submerged underwater.

    The nonprofit group Climate Central released renderings created by Nickolay Lamm showing what Venice would look like if sea levels rose 5, 12 or 25 feet.

    "This is not what should happen, ever," said Joe Smith, who moved to Venice in January. "People need to stop debating whether (climate change) is real and get on with what we should do to slow it down."

    The Union of Concerned Scientists is ringing the alarm and issuing reports indicating that major Antarctic glaciers are collapsing. They are most concerned about the West Antarctic ice sheet, fearing if it completely melts it would add 10 to 13 feet of sea level rise globally.

    "I think for me, the most alarming this is the growth of wildfires in the West," said Adam Markham of the Union of Concerned Scientists. "Wildfire season is now two months longer than it was in the 1970s."

    Markham said some of the country's most popular resorts are in jeopardy.

    "People need to recognize the places they care about, the places they visit on their summer vacation, are actually threatened and at risk from climate change and I don't think most people know that," Markham said.

    One woman new to Southern California lived through what scientists say may have been a result of climate change: Superstorm Sandy.

    "Houses, lives were destroyed and they are still recovering," said Ann Ellenson, who moved from Sandy Hook, New Jersey to Venice four days ago.

    Ellenson said its hard to believe that her new home of Venice could also be affected by climate change in the future.

    Scientists said sea levels rising that high are still 200 to 1000 years off.

    “I am very concerned, especially for my grandchildren and for future generations,” Ellenson said.
     

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