3 Palestinians, 3 Israelis Killed in Violence Over Holy Site - NBC Southern California
National & International News
The day’s top national and international news

3 Palestinians, 3 Israelis Killed in Violence Over Holy Site

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, meanwhile, announced that he is freezing ties with Israel

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    3 Palestinians, 3 Israelis Killed in Violence Over Holy Site
    Oded Balilty/AP
    Israeli border police officers stand guard as Palestinian women gather for prayer outside the Lion's Gate following an appeal from clerics to pray in the streets instead of the Al Aqsa Mosque compound, in Jerusalem's Old City, Wednesday, July 19, 2017. A dispute over metal detectors has escalated into a new showdown between Israel and the Muslim world over the contested Jerusalem shrine that has been at the center of violent confrontations in the past.

    Escalating Israeli-Palestinian tensions over the Holy Land's most contested shrine boiled over into violence on Friday that killed six people — three Palestinians in street clashes in Jerusalem and three Israelis in a stabbing attack at a West Bank settlement.

    After nightfall, a Palestinian sneaked into a home in the Israeli settlement of Halamish in the West Bank and stabbed to death three Israelis, the head of Israel's rescue service said.

    An Israeli news site said those killed were two men and a woman who were having dinner at the time. The army released footage showing a blood-covered kitchen floor.

    Israel TV's Channel 10 said the assailant was in his late teens and had posted on Facebook that he was upset by the events at the shrine. Eli Bin, the head of Israel's rescue service MDA, said an off-duty soldier next door heard screams, rushed to the home and shot the attacker through a window. Bin said the attacker was wounded and evacuated to hospital.

    Protesters Removed From Senate Health Care Bill Hearing

    [NATL] Health Care Bill Protesters Forcibly Removed From Senate Finance Committee Room

    Protesters chanting "No cuts for Medicaid, save our liberty!" were forcibly removed from the Senate Finance Committee room Monday as lawmakers attempted to convene a hearing into the Republican Graham Cassidy health care bill.

    (Published Monday, Sept. 25, 2017)

    Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, meanwhile, announced that he is freezing ties with Israel, dealing a blow to fledgling Trump administration efforts to try to renew long-dormant peace talks.

    Abbas said contacts with Israel would be suspended on "all levels." It was not immediately clear if this means long-standing security coordination between Israeli troops and Abbas' forces will be halted.

    At issue in the current round of violence are metal detectors Israel installed at the Jerusalem shrine earlier this week, in response to a deadly attack by Arab gunmen there.

    The metal detectors are perceived by the Palestinians as an encroachment on Muslim rights and portrayed by Israel as a needed security measure following the attack that killed two Israeli policemen.

    Earlier Friday, several thousand Palestinians in Jerusalem and the West Bank clashed with Israeli troops, burning tires or throwing stones and firecrackers. Troops fired live rounds, rubber bullets and tear gas. Three Palestinians were killed and several dozen hospitalized with live or rubber bullet injuries.

    White clouds of tear gas rose from Jerusalem streets and West Bank flashpoints. In one neighborhood, Palestinians threw stones from behind a mattress used as a shield.

    Israel also faced growing criticism from the Muslim world, and thousands staged anti-Israel protests after Friday prayers in Jordan and Yemen. Turkey and Egypt also condemned the violence.

    The confrontations in the Holy Land could escalate in coming days, as both sides dig in.

    Israel said the metal detectors would remain in place. Lawmaker Tzachi Hanegbi, a confidant of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, said Israel would not surrender to what he said were "violence and incitement" by those "attempting to drag us into a religious war."

    Jerusalem's top Muslim cleric, Mohammed Hussein, said protests, including mass street prayers outside the shrine, would continue until the devices are removed. He told worshippers Friday that they should prepare for a "long test of wills" with Israel.

    "We will not back off," he said.

    The shrine, revered by Muslims and Jews, sits at the emotional epicenter of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, symbolizing the rival religious and national narratives of the two sides.

    Lebron James: Trump Trying to 'Divide Us'

    [NATL] Lebron James: Trump Trying to 'Divide Us'

    Cleveland Cavaliers forward LeBron James spoke Monday about the NFL protest saying President Trump is trying to divide the nation.

    (Published Monday, Sept. 25, 2017)

    Disputes over the 37-acred (15-hectare) walled hilltop platform in Jerusalem's Old City have repeatedly triggered major confrontations in the past.

    Earlier this week, Israel began installing metal detectors at the gates of the compound, saying extra measures were required to prevent further attacks.

    Muslim leaders portrayed the metal detectors as part of a purported Israeli campaign to expand its control over the shrine — a claim Israel denies. Muslim clerics urged worshippers to pray in the streets near the shrine, rather than submit to the new security procedures.

    The faithful complied. Thousands flocked to the Old City each day this week for street prayers, kneeling on mats spread on cobble stone and asphalt.

    On Friday, the highlight of the Muslim religious week, Israeli police severely restricted Muslim access to the Old City to prevent mass protests.

    Some 3,000 officers were deployed at checkpoints in and around the city, turning away Muslim men under the age of 50, including those trying to reach the city from Israel and the West Bank.

    North Korean Minister: Trump Tweet Declared War

    [NATL] North Korean Foreign Minister: 'The United States Declared War'

    North Korea's top diplomat says President Donald Trump's tweet that leader Kim Jong Un "won't be around much longer" amounted to a declaration of war against his country.

    Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho told reporters Monday that what he called Trump's "declaration of war" gives North Korea "every right" under the U.N. Charter to take countermeasures, "including the right to shoot down the United States strategic bombers even they're not yet inside the airspace border of our country."

    Ri Yong also said that "all options will be on the operations table" for the government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

    Ri referred to Trump's tweet Saturday that said: "Just heard Foreign Minister of North Korea speak at U.N. If he echoes thoughts of Little Rocket Man, they won't be around much longer!"

    (Published Monday, Sept. 25, 2017)

    In the end, thousands reached the Old City — a fraction of the typical Friday turnout of tens of thousands of worshippers.

    After peaceful prayers, clashes erupted in several areas of Jerusalem and across the West Bank.

    Palestinian health officials said three Palestinians were killed by live fire in different areas of Jerusalem.

    The Red Crescent said 390 Palestinians were hurt, including close to 100 who were hospitalized for live fire or rubber bullet injuries. Israeli police said five officers were wounded.

    The perceived threat to the shrine, home to the Al Aqsa and Dome of the Rock mosques, has galvanized Palestinians — especially those in east Jerusalem which was captured by Israel in the 1967 Mideast war and quickly annexed.

    Since 1967, Israel has increasingly cut off east Jerusalem from its West Bank hinterland, leaving the city's Arab residents without a political leadership.

    The Aurora Borealis as Seen From Space

    [NATL] The Aurora Borealis as Seen From Space

    The European Space Agency has released these images of the Aurora Borealis shot from the International Space Station. The phenomenon occurs when electrically charged electrons and protons in the Earth's magenetic field collide with neutral atoms in the upper atmosphere.

    (Published Monday, Sept. 25, 2017)

    Muslim clerics stepped into the void this week, taking the lead in prayer protests.

    Under the post-1967 arrangements, Muslims administer the compound. Jews can visit, but not pray there. For decades, the status quo held, in part because leading rabbis, citing religious purity laws, banned Jews from entering.

    In recent years, religious opinion has shifted, and growing numbers of Jews are visiting the compound. This shift has stoked Muslim fears of a purported Israeli plan to expand Jewish control there. Israel has reiterated that it has no intention to change the status quo.

    Fakhri Abu Diab, a 55-year-old worshipper, said he feels Muslims must stand their ground.

    "If we let them, they (Israelis) will take over the mosque completely," he said, standing near the Old City. "If we resist them, they will stop."

    The dispute over the detectors has led to rising tensions between Israel and the Muslim world.

    NFL Players Protest During National Anthem

    [NATL] NFL Players Protest During National Anthem
    AP reporters counted more than 200 NFL players who did not stand during the national anthem before their games on Sunday. Six refused to stand the week before, mainly protesting police brutality.
    (Published Monday, Sept. 25, 2017)

    The compound is the third holiest site of Islam, after Mecca and Medina in Saudi Arabia. It is also Judaism's holiest site, once home to biblical Temples.

    Jordan, the custodian of the Jerusalem shrine, has repeatedly appealed to Israel to remove the devices. The two countries cooperate closely on regional security issues, but frequently disagree on Israel's policies at the shrine.

    On Friday, several thousand Jordanians protested against Israel in the Jordanian capital of Amman.

    Demonstrators chanted, "the people want to liberate Al Aqsa," referring to one of the mosques in the compound.

    Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said his country is in touch with Israeli officials to try to end the crisis. Speaking in Ankara after Friday prayers, he called Israel's security measures "radical," saying limits imposed on Muslim prayers would not contribute to a solution.

    Laub reported from the West Bank. Associated Press writer Ian Deitch in Jerusalem contributed to this report.

    Robber Hurt in Hold-Up Plans to Sue Good Samaritan

    [NATL-NY] Armed Robber Injured During Hold Up Suing Good Samaritan Who Tried to Help

    An armed robber injured when a Good Samaritan stepped in to stop his hold-up of a California Starbucks is now planning to sue over the injuries he sustained. KSEE's Connie Tran reports.

    (Published Friday, Sept. 22, 2017)