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FBI Releases Interview Notes With Boston Marathon Bomber

Tamerlan Tsarnaev didn't think there could be any Islamic radicals in Cambridge, according to the notes

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    FBI Releases Interview Notes With Boston Marathon Bomber
    AP
    Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, who had been known to the FBI as Suspect No. 1 in the Boston Marathon explosions and was seen in surveillance footage in a black baseball cap, was killed on Friday, April 19, 2013.

    The FBI has released its notes from an interview with Boston Marathon bomber Tamerlan Tsarnaev that took place two years before the terror attack.

    NBC News' Tom Winter reports that the interview was conducted in April of 2011 by the FBI Boston Field Office. Tsarnaev was approached by the FBI after Russian intelligence alerted U.S. authorities to Tsarnaev's travels to Chechnya.

    The interview summary says that Tsarnaev told the authorities he went to mosque in Cambridge just once a week, didn't read any extremist material online and had not traveled to Saudi Arabia for the Hajj because it was too expensive. He also said he didn't think there could be any Islamic radicals in Cambridge. He added that he had "respect for all religions" and felt that any religion makes your life better.

    Other details included in the documents include that Tsarnaev had recently quit his job at a local pizzeria after previously working at Home Depot. Tsarnaev also "expressed an interest in Spartan warrior culture" and was interested in boxing for the U.S. Olympic team but didn't have his citizenship.

    Tamerlan Tsarnaev and his younger brother, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, planted two pressure-cooker bombs near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013, killing three people and injuring more than 260.

    Tamerlan Tsarnaev, who was 26 at the time of the bombing, was killed during a getaway attempt several days after the bombings. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, then 19, was sentenced to death last year for his role in the bombings.