'Go Give Him a Hug': Officer Honored for Saving 3-Year-Old | NBC Southern California
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'Go Give Him a Hug': Officer Honored for Saving 3-Year-Old

"Everything else that's going on around you doesn't matter," Officer Chase Miller said of performing CPR on Brayden Geis

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    When seconds mattered, a Granbury police officer made an impact that will last a lifetime. And on Wednesday, the family of the 3-year-old boy whose life he saved got to thank their hero. (Published Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016)

    When seconds mattered, a North Texas police officer made an impact that will last a lifetime. And on Wednesday, the family of the 3-year-old boy whose life he saved got to thank its hero.

    "Go give him a hug," Bethany Hoover told her 3-year-old son, Brayden Geis, sending him over to Granbury Police Officer Chase Miller.

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    Granbury Police Officer Chase Miller was nearby when heard the call on his radio for a child who stopped breathing. Even though he wasn't directly dispatched, Miller came straight over, making it to the scene long before an ambulance. He calmly started CPR, and helped save the boy's life.
    (Published Thursday, Oct. 20, 2016)

    There was a lot of meaning in that hug, a thank you too big for words for what Miller did last week.

    "I thought my life was over when it happened. I mean, he is my life," Hoover said of her son.

    Brayden was visiting his mother at work when he spiked a fever, had a seizure and stopped breathing.

    "His eyes were rolling further and further in the back of his head, and it was just something you never want to see your son do," said Brayden's father, John Geis.

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    Miller was close by and heard the call on his radio. Even though he wasn't directly dispatched, Miller came straight over, making it to the scene long before an ambulance. He calmly took Brayden from his frantic mother and immediately started CPR.

    "Just trying to get him breathing," Miller said. "Everything else that's going on around you doesn't matter at that point."

    Miller got out a breathing mask and had Brayden's dad continue chest compressions until he started breathing again.

    "He was crying and it was just relief immediately," Hoover said.

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    Granbury's City Council honored Miller for his quick thinking Tuesday night. But a hug from Brayden's little arms is all he needs.

    "It feels good to know that he's all right," Miller said. "I'm very thankful."

    Thankful doesn't begin to cover it for Brayden's mom and dad. Their little fireball is back at it like nothing happened, though his parents will make sure he knows the story.

    "He's going to know who saved his life," John Geis said.

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    Miller and his wife are expecting their first child, and Brayden's mom gave him some advice: never let go.

    The two families plan to stay in touch for a long time.