Apple Introduces 'Do Not Disturb While Driving' Feature for iOS 11 | NBC Southern California
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Apple Introduces 'Do Not Disturb While Driving' Feature for iOS 11

The feature detects when you're on the road and silences all notifications

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    Apple Introduces 'Do Not Disturb While Driving' Feature for iOS 11
    Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
    Apple's Senior Vice President of Software Engineering Craig Federighi speaks during the opening keynote address the 2017 Apple Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) at the San Jose Convention Center on June 5, 2017 in San Jose, California.

    Getting distracted at the wheel by your phone? Apple may be able to help.

    A "do not disturb" mode for drivers will be part of the iOS 11 operating system, which is slated for release this fall for both iPhone and iPad.

    When activated, "do not disturb" detects when you're on the road and silences all notifications, even blocking you from accessing the homescreen and applications, USA Today reported.

    Users can also enable an auto-text response that they are driving or choose specific contacts who can break through the feature in the case of an important message.

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    Apple executive Craig Federighi made the announcement Monday at the company's annual Worldwide Developers Conference in San Jose, California. A similar feature already exists on Google Android phones.

    “It's all about keeping your eyes on the road,” Federigihi said at the conference. “When you are driving, you don’t need to be responding to these kind of messages.”