<![CDATA[NBC Southern California - Politics]]>Copyright 2016http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/politics http://media.nbcnewyork.com/designimages/NBC4_40x125.png NBC Southern California http://www.nbclosangeles.comen-usWed, 07 Dec 2016 04:43:30 -0800Wed, 07 Dec 2016 04:43:30 -0800NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[Donald Trump's Transition to the Presidency]]> Tue, 06 Dec 2016 13:32:16 -0800 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-624646258.jpg

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Biden Emotional at Cancer Funding Bill Partly Named for Son]]> Tue, 06 Dec 2016 03:34:15 -0800 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/AP_16341007670452.jpg

A bipartisan bill to speed government drug approvals and bolster biomedical research cleared its last procedural hurdle in the Senate on Monday in an emotional moment for outgoing Vice President Joe Biden, NBC News reported. 

The overwhelming 85-13 vote put the measure on track for final legislative approval by the Senate as early as Tuesday. President Barack Obama has promised to sign the measure, one of the last for the president and the 114th Congress, whose leaders hope to adjourn by week's end after a two-year session that has seen them clash frequently with the president. 

The bill envisions providing $6.3 billion over the next decade, including $1.8 billion for cancer research. Obama had placed Biden in charge of a "moonshot" to find ways to cure and treat the disease, which killed his son Beau, 46, last year. 

Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., sought approval for renaming a portion of the bill after Beau Biden. The Senate agreed, and lawmakers of both parties applauded and lined up to share quiet words and pats on the shoulder with the vice president, who sat teary-eyed in the presiding officer's chair of the chamber where he served as senator for 36 years. A clerk handed Biden a tissue.



Photo Credit: Senate TV via AP]]>
<![CDATA[Al Gore Has 'Extremely Interesting Conversation' With Trump]]> Tue, 06 Dec 2016 10:57:19 -0800 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/AP_16340594702500.jpg

Former Vice President Al Gore met Monday with president-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower. Gore described the interaction as “an extremely interesting conversation,” NBC News reports.

Gore didn’t say exactly what he and Trump discussed during the meeting. He also met with Trump’s daughter, Ivanka Trump, who reportedly wants to make climate change a priority. The former vice president has an influential voice in the fight against human-caused climate change.

Before his electoral victory, Donald Trump called climate change a hoax “created by and for the Chinese.” Since then, he’s said he has an “open mind” about humans' effect on the climate.



Photo Credit: Andrew Harnik/AP]]>
<![CDATA[California Considers Bills to Protect Immigrants Under Trump]]> Mon, 05 Dec 2016 12:35:03 -0800 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/inmigrantes-indocumentados-deportaciones-victoria-donald-trump.jpg

California lawmakers are planning bills to help protect immigrants from an expected increase in immigration enforcement under President-elect Donald Trump.

Lawmakers on Monday are expected to introduce a resolution committing the state to protecting its immigrant population. They are also expected to introduce bills to provide attorneys to immigrants in deportation proceedings and help public defenders weigh the immigration consequences of criminal convictions.

The moves come as the nation’s most populous state prepares for tougher immigration enforcement promised by Trump during the presidential campaign.

Immigrant advocates say state bills are also being considered to limit federal immigration enforcement and protect immigrants’ information in state databases.

U.S. Census Bureau data shows California has more than 10 million foreign-born residents.

Both houses of the California legislature have Democratic supermajorities.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Sarah Palin Warns of ‘Crony Capitalism’ After Trump Deal ]]> Fri, 02 Dec 2016 21:22:49 -0800 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/el-factor-palin.jpg

An unexpected dissenting voice came out Friday against a Trump administration brokered deal to keep a Carrier plant in Indiana and save around 1,000 jobs, NBC News reported.

Former Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin in an op-ed for the Young Conservatives website called the deal, which was reportedly negotiated by Vice President-elect Mike Pence, an example of government intervention that could lead to "crony capitalism."

"Republicans oppose this, remember? Instead, we support competition on a level playing field, remember?" Palin wrote. "Because we know special interest crony capitalism is one big fail."



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Who's Who in Trump's Brain Trust]]> Tue, 06 Dec 2016 11:18:59 -0800 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/223*120/trump-cab-adv-th.jpg
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<![CDATA[Trump Names Panel of Executives to Advise on Private Sector]]> Fri, 02 Dec 2016 11:22:48 -0800 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/Donald-Trump-cancela-reunion-con-The-New-York-Times.jpg

The CEOs of General Motors, Disney and Wal-Mart are among those who will have Donald Trump's ear during his presidency.

They are all part of the President's Strategic and Policy Forum, a group of CEOs, business executives and thinkers announced Friday who are to regularly meet with Trump to discuss the best ways to create jobs.

The group will be led by the chairman and CEO of investment group Blackstone, Stephen A. Schwarzman. The Trump transition team said in a statement that it believes the forum will help the president-elect better understand how government policy affects the private sector.

“This forum brings together CEOs and business leaders who know what it takes to create jobs and drive economic growth,” Trump said in a statement. “My administration is committed to drawing on private sector expertise and cutting the government red tape that is holding back our businesses from hiring, innovating, and expanding right here in America.”

President-elect Trump is not the first to create a team of this sort. President Obama created a similar group in his first term, the President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness, which provided non-partisan advice on job creation and the economy. Unlike Trump's group, it included union leaders.

Other members of Trump's forum include:
Paul Atkins, CEO, Patomak Global Partners, LLC, Former Commissioner of the Securities and Exchange Commission
Mary Barra, Chairman and CEO, General Motors
Toby Cosgrove, CEO, Cleveland Clinic
Jamie Dimon, Chairman and CEO, JP Morgan Chase & Co
Larry Fink, Chairman and CEO, BlackRock
Bob Iger, Chairman and CEO, The Walt Disney Company 
Rich Lesser, President and CEO, Boston Consulting Group 
Doug McMillon, President and CEO, Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.
Jim McNerney, Former Chairman, President, and CEO, Boeing
Adebayo “Bayo” Ogunlesi, Chairman and Managing Partner, Global Infrastructure Partners
Ginni Rometty, Chairman, President, and CEO, IBM
Kevin Warsh, Shepard Family Distinguished Visiting Fellow in Economics, Hoover Institute, Former Member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System
Mark Weinberger, Global Chairman and CEO, EY
Jack Welch, Former Chairman and CEO, General Electric
Daniel Yergin, Pulitzer Prize-winner, Vice Chairman of IHS Markit



Photo Credit: Getty Images, File]]>
<![CDATA[Trump Starts Victory Tour At Indiana Factory ]]> Thu, 01 Dec 2016 14:05:39 -0800 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/NC_trump161201_1500x845.jpg President-elect Donald Trump starts his victory tour at a Carrier plant in Indiana on Dec. 1, 2016, celebrating Carrier's decision to keep a thousand jobs slated for Mexico within the United States. ]]> <![CDATA[Sarah Palin Interested in Trump Administration Job: Sources]]> Thu, 01 Dec 2016 03:51:07 -0800 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/SarahPalin-AP_322537202252.jpg

Sarah Palin has been in touch with Trump transition officials about a role with the incoming administration, according to sources close to the former Alaska governor. While there is no confirmation what specific position she might be interested in, her son-in-law has dropped a hint, NBC News reported.

Dakota Meyer, a Medal of Honor recipient married to Palin's daughter Bristol, posted his appeal on Facebook, including a video that makes a glossy pitch for Palin as an advocate for America's veterans. 

"Governor Palin has relayed to the Trump transition team her offer to continue helping the next President either in the public or private sector," a Palin adviser said.

However, Trump transition officials declined to comment on what position, if any, for which Palin might be considered.



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Analysis: Why Trump's Reliance on Debunked Theories Raises Concern]]> Tue, 29 Nov 2016 19:08:36 -0800 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/trump50.jpg

During his run for the White House, Donald Trump stirred up controversy with frequent, unsubstantiated attacks directed toward various groups and individuals, from his political rivals to foreign governments to news outlets.

Now, as NBC News reports, some are raising concerns about Trump's information sources and whether the president-elect will act on false or flawed reports. 

For instance, Trump's recent claim that Hillary Clinton won the popular vote with "millions" of illegal voters was a baseless theory popularized primarily by conspiracy theorist Alex Jones of Infowars. 

Many argue that being able to discern credibility in news reports is a crucial skill for a president, and they argue that a seeming inability, or disinclination, to separate fact from fiction could pose serious threats to national security.



Photo Credit: Spencer Platt, Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Trump to Kick Off 'Thank You Tour' Thursday: Source]]> Tue, 29 Nov 2016 07:58:22 -0800 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/AP_16314285768609.jpg

President-elect Donald Trump is set to embark on a tour to thank supporters who carried him to the White House. 

A source in the Trump camp confirmed to NBC News Tuesday that Trump's "Thank You Tour" is set to begin on Thursday with a rally in Cincinnati.

During the campaign, Trump's rallies often drew thousands of people and were often broadcast live. Trump won Michigan, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and Florida, states won by President Obama in 2008 and 2012.  

George Gigicos, Trump’s director of advance, told reporters on Nov. 17 that Trump's may visit "swing states we flipped over" after the election, Bloomberg reported. 

Gigicos corrected reporters who called it a "victory tour," according to Bloomberg. “‘Thank you tour,’ Gigicos said. "It’s not a ‘victory tour.'"



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Stein Defends Recount Efforts]]> Mon, 28 Nov 2016 08:58:46 -0800 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/BOST_000000002535167.JPG

Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein is defending her decision to ask for recounts in three states that helped give President-elect Donald Trump his victory, arguing there could have been issues with how the votes were counted.

"Tampering is not done in a way that declares itself. You have to actually go in and count the paper ballots," she said Sunday evening in an interview with necn.

Stein's push for the recount gained new momentum Saturday when Hillary Clinton's campaign broke its silence to say it would join the recount in Wisconsin and possible recounts in Pennsylvania and Michigan. Trump's margin of victory in each state was slim, while Clinton won the popular vote by over 2 million votes, according to one tracker.

The Clinton campaign's support for the recount drew harsh criticism from Trump, who took to Twitter to call the effort a scam and suggested, without evidence, that he would have won the popular vote after deducting "millions of people who voted illegally." 

"There is no evidence of illegal voters," Stein said in respose. "You're entitled to your own opinions but you can't have your own facts."

The Clinton campaign also found no "actionable evidence" of hacking or machine manipulation, but joined the ongoing effort to make sure the recount process is fair to all parties, a campaign lawyer wrote online Saturday. He added that the campaign is aware that the margin of victory in Michigan exceeds "well exceeds the largest margin ever overcome in a recount."

Stein took just 1 percent of the vote in the election, but says she does not believe her candidacy would have affected the election results, nor is recount being done "for one candidate or against another."

"Sixty-one percent of Green voters would not have cast a vote for either Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump," she said.

Stein has raised more than $6 million to pay for these recounts. Wisconsin's recount is scheduled to start this weekend, pending approval from the Elections commission, and the deadline to file for recounts in Pennsylvania and Michigan are Monday and Wednesday, respectively.

Stein said the party plans to file for recounts in each of those states on their deadline days.

"We need peace of mind about our voting system in this election and going forward," Stein said.



Photo Credit: necn]]>