<![CDATA[NBC Southern California - Politics]]>Copyright 2016http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/politics http://media.nbcnewyork.com/designimages/NBC4_40x125.png NBC Southern California http://www.nbclosangeles.comen-usWed, 26 Oct 2016 22:02:43 -0700Wed, 26 Oct 2016 22:02:43 -0700NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[Ex-Congressman: 'If Trump Loses, I’m Grabbing My Musket']]> Wed, 26 Oct 2016 15:30:27 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/joe+walsh+trump+tweet.png

Former Illinois Congressman Joe Walsh tweeted Wednesday afternoon that he plans to take up arms if Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump loses on Election Day.

"On November 8th, I’m voting for Trump," Walsh tweeted. "On November 9th, if Trump loses, I’m grabbing my musket," asking his nearly 80,000 Twitter followers, "You in?" 

When CNN's Jake Tapper replied, "what exactly does that mean?" Walsh responded, "It means protesting. Participating in acts of civil disobedience. Doing what it takes to get our country back."

Walsh, who hosts a syndicated radio show on AM-560, later told NBC5 that the tweet was tongue-in-cheek.

"We're talking about a musket," Walsh said. "I could've said grab your slingshot and let's go. Metaphorically, I meant grab your muskets, if Trump loses, man, we're going to do what we have to do. We're going to protest and boycott and practice civil disobedience. We may start a third party."

"We're going to do a lot of things to get our country back, that's what I meant," Walsh added.

Walsh is no stranger to controversy. In July, he came under fire for an inflammatory tweet after multiple police officers were shot, five fatally, by two snipers at the end of a peaceful protest in Dallas. 

“3 Dallas Cops killed, 7 wounded,” Walsh tweeted at the time. "This is now war. Watch out Obama. Watch out black lives matter punks. Real America is coming after you.”

Walsh later tweeted that he “wasn’t calling for violence, against Obama or anyone.”

“Obama’s words & BLM’s deeds have gotten cops killed,” he wrote. “Time for us to defend our cops.”

Walsh served one term in Illinois as the representative for the state’s 8th Congressional District before being defeated by Rep. Tammy Duckworth in 2012.

Photo Credit: AP
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<![CDATA[Polls: Clinton Leads in New Hampshire; Tied in Nevada ]]> Wed, 26 Oct 2016 15:44:26 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/split-clintontrump-april16.jpg

Democrat Hillary Clinton has jumped out to a nine-point lead in the battleground state of New Hampshire, while she’s tied with Republican Donald Trump in Nevada, according to two new NBC News/Wall Street Journal/Marist polls.

In New Hampshire, Clinton gets the support of 45 percent of likely voters, and Trump gets 36 percent. Libertarian Gary Johnson is at 10 percent and the Green Party’s Jill Stein is at 4 percent.

In a two-way race, Clinton’s advantage over Trump is eight points, 47 percent to 39 percent – up from her one-point lead last month, 42 percent to 41 percent.

In Nevada, meanwhile, Clinton and Trump are tied among likely voters, 43 percent to 43 percent, and Johnson gets 10 percent. Stein isn't on the ballot in the Silver State.

In a head-to-head contest in Nevada, Clinton and Trump remain tied at 45 percent each.

“In Las Vegas terms, the contest for Nevada’s six electoral votes is a ‘push’ right now,” says Lee Miringoff, director of the Marist College Institute for Public Opinion. 

According to Miringoff, Clinton could lose Florida, Nevada, North Carolina and Ohio – but still win the presidency by holding on to New Hampshire's four electoral votes and Pennsylvania.

Photo Credit: Getty Images, File
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<![CDATA[Vandal With Ax Breaks Trump's Walk of Fame Star to Pieces]]> Wed, 26 Oct 2016 18:16:15 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/214*120/10-25-2016-trump-star-hollywood-2.JPG

Donald Trump's star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame was in pieces Wednesday morning after it was destroyed overnight by a man with an ax and sledgehammer.

The Republican presidential candidate and former "Apprentice" host received the star in January 2007 for his role on the NBC show. The star in the 6800 block of Hollywood Boulevard, a prominent location on the Walk of Fame not far from the Hollywood and Highland Center, was broken into pieces overnight by the vandal, according to a boulevard street performer.

Deadline Hollywood posted video of what appeared to be a man dressed as a construction worker in work boots, a high visibility safety vest and helmet smashing the star. The man took a few swings at the star with the sledgehammer, then went to work on it with a pick ax -- chipping away pieces, letters of Trump's name and the TV plaque embedded in the sidewalk star.

The video, shot by a Deadline Hollywood employee, shows several LA Department of Transportation signs and bright orange construction cones around the star. 

Los Angeles police confirmed they are investigating the vandalism report, received at about 6 a.m. No arrests were reported Wednesday morning.

A man who identified himself as Jamie Otis told Deadline Hollywood that he is responsible for the damage. He said his intent was to remove the star and sell it to raise money for 11 women accusing the presidential candidate of groping them.

Aerial video later Wednesday morning showed people taking photos of the damaged star, which was roped off by repair crews. A pick axe and sledgehammer were recovered at the scene, according to the LAPD.

One of the boulevard's street performers, a man painted gold and dressed head-to-toe in shiny gold clothes, described a bizarre early morning scene at the popular tourist spot. The man said the he saw a man dressed as a construction worker hammering the star with the sledgehammer.

"He was banging on the star," Gregory Howie said. "He took Donald Trump's name out and he took his round plaque out."

Gregory said the man told him he intended to remove the star and sell it, then donate the money to organizations that support sexually abused women.

Trump has faced accusations from 11 women of sexual misconduct in recent weeks as the presidential campaign enters its final stages. He has denied the accusations. 

The Walk of Fame is administered by the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce, which said in a statement that the star will be repaired immediately. The repairs will take several days, and the star will be covered to protect it during that time. 

"The Hollywood Walk of Fame is an institution celebrating the positive contributions of the inductees," said Leron Gubler, President-CEO of the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce. "When people are unhappy with one of our honorees, we would hope that they would project their anger in more positive ways than to vandalize a California state landmark. Our democracy is based on respect for the law. People can make a difference by voting and not destroying public property."

The Hollywood star belonging to the New York business magnate and reality show personality has become a target during the presidential campaign, ever since Trump announced his candidacy last year. It has been defaced with spray paint and surrounded by a miniature wall in protest of Trump's plan to build a wall at the U.S.-Mexico border.

Walk of Fame star recipients are selected by a committee that considers hundreds of applications each year. The stars ane purchased for a $30,000, rather than gifted.

Photo Credit: KNBC-TV]]>
<![CDATA[Trump Campaign Refutes Report It Stopped Fundraising for GOP]]> Wed, 26 Oct 2016 03:46:43 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/AP_16299527284723.jpg

Donald Trump's campaign is pushing back against a new report that says Trump has all but stopped raising money for the joint fundraising effort with the Republican National Committee, insisting that the campaign is continuing to support the Republican Party, NBC News reported.

Trump finance chairman Steven Mnuchin told NBC News that the report by The Washington Post was "completely misleading" and that "we continue to do fundraising for Trump Victory."

The Post reported Tuesday evening that the Trump campaign has "wound down" its joint fundraising effort, holding its last major fundraiser Oct. 19 in Las Vegas, and that it would still raise money online. The Post has since changed its headline but kept the contents of the story.

The report caused a stir because most of the money raised through Trump Victory goes to help the Republican Party implement an effective ground game and a get-out-the-vote effort and to help candidates down the ballot.

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[5th Supervisorial District Vie for Seat]]> Tue, 25 Oct 2016 19:58:44 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/5th_Supervisorial_District_Vie_for_Seat_1200x675_793637443590.jpg Kamala Harris gets a major endorsement in the battle against Loretta Sanchez to nab a senate seat. Conan Nolan reports for the NBC4 News at 6 on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2016.]]> <![CDATA[Black Applicants Rejected for Trump Housing Speak Out]]> Wed, 26 Oct 2016 03:27:38 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-617989488.jpg

In 1973, New York City school teacher Annette Gandy Fortt was looking for a decent place to live. A listing for an apartment in a building owned by Donald Trump's father, Fred, caught her eye — but she says the super told her there were no units available.

"I was black," Fortt said recently. "I was not wanted."

As NBC News reports, after Fortt was turned away from the Queens apartment building twice, the New York City Human Rights Commission sent a white person to the property to apply for an apartment — and the tester was offered the apartment, according to court papers.

The commission took on Fortt's case, and she says a young Donald Trump appeared with a lawyer at a hearing on behalf of the family real estate company, Trump Management.

Her case also became part of a federal racial discrimination lawsuit filed by the Justice Department against Donald and Fred Trump that was resolved with a consent decree two years later in which they agreed to terms aimed at preventing discrimination.

That lawsuit is the basis of a new video from Hillary Clinton's campaign, released Tuesday.

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Trump Says He Would 'Love' to Fight Biden]]> Tue, 25 Oct 2016 18:43:38 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/trump+biden+split.jpg

If Vice President Biden was serious about taking Trump "behind the gym," it sounds like Donald Trump is in.

Rounding out a full day of rallies in Florida Tuesday night, the Republican presidential nominee went off on a tangent against Biden, calling him "Mr. Tough Guy" for comments the VP made last week that if it were high school he'd take Trump "behind the gym."

Trump remembered the comments slightly differently — he said, "did you see Biden wants to take me to the back of the barn?" — but wasn't deterred by the sentiment behind them.

"I'd love that," he said of the idea of the two men tussling, NBC News reported.

<![CDATA[Trump Brags of Endorsements That Never Happened]]> Tue, 25 Oct 2016 09:15:39 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/AP_16299001639237.jpg

Donald Trump on Monday told News4Jax that the United States military "conceptually" endorsed him and that "virtually every police department" supports his bid for the presidency. And during the third presidential debate, Trump said his hardline stance on immigration had earned him an endorsement from Immigration and Customs Enforcement, NBC News reported.

None of that is true.

Federal agencies are barred by law from endorsing candidates in political elections. The Department of Defense, meanwhile, has its own set of guidelines that tightly restricts any active duty military or civilian personnel from publicly choosing political sides.

ICE has not endorsed any candidate, nor is it able to. Instead the union representing ICE employees, National Immigration and Customs Enforcement Council, gave the Republican nominee its backing. And it represents just a quarter of the more than 20,000 employees that work at the agency.

Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[GOP Fractured as Clinton Maintains Solid Lead: Poll]]> Tue, 25 Oct 2016 09:16:43 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/trump-clinton-debate-split.jpg

With Hillary Clinton leading Donald Trump in the polls as the election enters its final two weeks, a majority of Republicans and Republican-leaning voters see a lasting fracture in the Republican Party, according to the latest NBC NewsSurveyMonkey poll.

In a four-way match-up, Clinton has 46 percent support this week among likely voters, while Trump holds onto 41 percent support.

As several prominent GOP party leaders and down-ballot Republican contenders scramble to figure out the potential impact of a Clinton victory in their respective states, 74 percent of likely voters overall say that the GOP is divided and will remain so through the general election in November.

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Democrats Take Aim at GOP Senate Majority]]> Mon, 24 Oct 2016 18:48:09 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-617720724.jpg

On Monday it was Sen. Elizabeth Warren's turn to join her fellow Democrats in cranking up the heat on Republican members of the Senate, who have become targets in the closing days of the campaign.

Addressing an enthusiastic outdoor rally on a crisp New England autumn day, Warren had plenty of barbs for Republican Donald Trump. But the Massachusetts Democrat also tore into the state's Republican incumbent, Sen. Kelly Ayotte, with unusual ferocity, NBC News reported.

"Donald Trump sure has made Kelly Ayotte dance. Day one she loves him, day two she hates him, day three she's back with him — boy, spins round and round," Warren told hundreds on a lawn at St. Anselm College.

Ayotte is in a tight race for re-election against Gov. Maggie Hassan, a Democrat. Like most of the other GOP senators up for reelection this year, Ayotte hardly comes from Trump's wing of the party and has never been a vocal supporter.

But there is no safe distance Republicans can stand from Trump. Democrats, eyeing multiple polls suggesting Clinton has all but sewn up the presidential race, are spending the final two weeks of this campaign working mercilessly to turn the entire GOP into Trump's collateral damage.

Photo Credit: Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Saturday Night Live: Tom Hanks Hosts, Lady Gaga Performs]]> Sun, 23 Oct 2016 03:41:38 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/Tom-Hanks-SNL-Debate.jpg

With Halloween around the corner, it’s fitting that “Saturday Night Live” would open this week’s episode with something unsettling, like the latest presidential debate. Alec Baldwin’s Donald Trump returned to go hair-to-head with Kate McKinnon’s Hillary Clinton in this sendup, moderated by the night’s guest host, Tom Hanks, as Fox News’ Chris Wallace.

The unprecedented discourse in this election cycle, particularly from the GOP candidate, allows a mean-mugging Baldwin to draw laughs by simply repeating some of the real Trump’s words verbatim.

For instance, Trump dropped two new terms at the debate this week: “bad hombres” and “nasty woman,” the latter of which was directed specifically at Clinton. In the sketch, Baldwin pulls out a notecard to make sure he'd said everything he'd intended; one side of the card reads in large handwriting, "Nasty woman" and the other, "Bad hombres." 

And, as McKinnon illustrated by playing a self-congratulating, sometimes smug Clinton, Trump’s consistent choice to cross such lines of generally acceptable social conduct might give Clinton the feeling that she’s got the election on lock.

Baldwin’s Trump did point out, though, that he’s ahead in every poll (well, every poll that’s conducted at a Cracker Barrel restaurant), and that, anyway, the election system is rigged against him. The media are to blame for much of that, he said.

Hanks’ Wallace asked Trump how it is that the media are making him look bad.

“By taking everything I say, and everything I do, and putting it on television,” he replied.

When McKinnon’s Clinton was asked about Wikileaks and the emails from her private server, she masterfully dodged the question and pivoted right to Trump’s treatment of women.

“Nobody has more respect for women than I do,” Baldwin’s Trump said, at which point cameras panned out to the SNL audience to show everyone laughing, hard, at the claim, which real Trump has made on more than one occasion. As Michael Che said later on the Weekend Update segment, “Nobody has more respect for women than you do? What about other women? What about RuPaul?”

The debate cold open ended with the Democratic candidate pledging to be a “stone-cold B” if elected, while Trump promoted the probably-not-real Nov. 9, 2016, launch of Trump TV.

Nine-time host Tom Hanks ("Inferno," “Sully”) performed a monologue in a cardigan as “America’s dad,” gently coaching the country through difficult times as one might an adolescent daughter or son (“Sure, China might be popular right now, but you, you are so dang creative!”) and lamely offering up cautionary advice (“You’ve got a lotta guns, kiddo — do you need all those guns?”) that will likely go unheeded.

Kenan Thompson hosted "Black Jeopardy!" in the episode’s first post-opening sketch. Cast members Sasheer Zamata and Leslie Jones took two of the contestant spots, while Hanks' character Doug, a stereotypical "blue collar" Trump supporter, took the third. Despite all low expectations, white contestant Doug performed competitively, impressing the host and other contestants with his distrust of the government and his appreciation for sturdily built females and Tyler Perry films. But just as everyone was feeling like maybe they weren’t so different from one another after all, it was time for Final Jeopardy. The category? “Lives That Matter.”

“Well, it was fun while it lasted, Doug,” Thompson said, closing out the sketch.

As Saturday saw the 11th in a series of women come out to publicly accuse Donald Trump of sexual misconduct, the Weekend Update segment went for the GOP candidate right away.

On Trump alleging that his women accusers are just looking for their "10 minutes of fame”: “He’s so cheap, he’s lowballing them on their minutes of fame.”

Mocking the GOP candidate’s seeming inability to keep from behaving like a reality show personality: “‘I’ll tell if you if I’m going to tear apart the fabric of our democracy…right after this break.”

Cast member Leslie Jones guested on Weekend Update, addressing cybersecurity in the wake of this week’s massive DDoS attacks on a DNS company in New Hampshire. Major sites from Twitter to Netflix to Soundcloud were all taken down Friday in a highly coordinated attack.

Jones was personally the victim of hackers earlier this year, and on Saturday’s show she called out trolls for sitting behind their screens rather than confronting people in real life. Also, she said, she’s not trying to hide anything, so why bother hacking her? “If you want to see Leslie Jones naked — just ask!” she said.

Cecily Strong appeared as her “Girl You Wish You Hadn’t Started a Conversation With at a Party” character, sloshing white wine and passionately mispronouncing hot takes on the election.

Alec Baldwin joined Tom Hanks for a Sully-related sketch.

Several other sketches were Halloween-themed, including one featuring Hanks debuting a character, David Pumpkins, who may or may not be the scariest Halloween character of all time.

Lady Gaga performed two songs from her new album “Joanne”: “A-Yo” and “Million Reasons.”

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<![CDATA[Miley Cyrus Campaigns for Clinton at College Dorm in Virginia]]> Sun, 23 Oct 2016 04:26:18 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/Miley+Cyrus+GMU.jpg

She came in like a wrecking ball.

Singer and entertainer Miley Cyrus went door-knocking for Hillary Clinton at a George Mason University dorm Saturday afternoon.

Dressed in an “American flag” outfit that consisted of an oversize blue bow and a red-and-white striped skirt, Cyrus told students she agrees with Clinton’s views.

“Me and Hillary share equality for all. Everyone gets stuck on voting for her out of fear of what could be, but I would vote for her anyway,” she said. “Trump doesn’t understand how personal it is for women to be in control of their own health – access to checkups, birth control.”

She spoke about a recent trip home to Nashville that she described as a “wakeup call.”

“I saw one Hillary poster in a sea of terrifying Trump supporters and posters. This election has been super hateful, not only for the nominees themselves, but within our own community. When I post support for Hillary on Instagram, I can’t believe the hate that I get,” Cyrus said. “It seems like you’re just talking to different people that live on different planets.”

She added that “it’s not like I don’t understand the other side, because I grew up with a super conservative family.”

Many of the students told her they will be voting for Clinton, including Vashti Aveirls, who described meeting Cyrus as “surreal.”

“It was super cool. She’s beautiful and she’s a good person,” Aveirls said. “It’s nice to know that Hillary has people out here that actually care about her message, coming door to door, knocking on college student’s doors, so I felt really happy.”

GMU student Lauren Henry also met Cyrus.

“I’m pretty sure all of us are registered to vote already and are definitely planning on it, so having her there to hype us up and try to extend that excitement to other family members and community was really exciting,” Henry said.

Cyrus suggested to students that they convince their friends to vote on Election Day by making it a social event.

“You can go out to eat and celebrate afterward. Make a whole day out of it. It’s just fun to go. It’s important,” she said.

Cyrus’ visit caused a big stir on campus. Dozens of students camped out in the lobby of Piedmont Hall, the dorm where Cyrus was. The students told News4 they had been waiting for three hours to catch a glimpse of her. Outside the dorm, a long line of students sang “Wrecking Ball” as they waited, then cheered when they saw her in a window.

Donald Trump was in Virginia too this afternoon, holding a rally at Regent University.

Garren Shipley, the Virginia communications director for the Republican National Committee, said in an email, “Hillary Clinton has often said that this campaign is about role models. Miley Cyrus is campaigning for her today in Northern Virginia. Foam finger manufacturers could not be reached for comment."

[[398052231, C]]

Cyrus wasn't the only star musician stumping for Clinton with college voters. 

Katy Perry also hit the dorms on Saturday. The "Roar" singer knocked on doors at UNLV in the hopes of convincing young Nevada voters to support Clinton. Her shirt read "Nasty Woman" in a reference to a comment Trump made against Clinton at the final presidential debate. 

Photo Credit: Aimee Cho/NBCWashington
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<![CDATA[11th Woman Accuses Trump of Inappropriate Sexual Conduct]]> Sat, 22 Oct 2016 17:59:22 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/jessica-drake-and-allred.jpg

An adult film performer came forward Saturday alleging Donald Trump kissed her without permission 10 years ago and offered her money and the use of his private jet, becoming the 11th woman to accuse the Republican presidential candidate of inappropriate sexual behavior since the leaked footage of Trump making inappropriate comments. 

Jessica Drake appeared with prominent attorney Gloria Allred, who warned Trump at the start of a press conference that if he sued all of the accusers as he pledged hours earlier, the women involved would have the option to file cross complaints. 

"Be careful what you wish for, Mr. Trump," Allred said. "If you sue the accusers, the lawyers who represent these woman will have the opportunity to depose you." 

Drake who worked for Wicked Pictures as an adult performer and director, accused Trump of grabbing her and kissing her without permission in a California hotel room in 2006. She showed a photo of herself with Trump at the time they met.

"I understand I may be called a liar or an opportunist but I will risk that in order to stand in solidarity with women who share similar accounts that span many, many years," Drake said. 

She said she met Trump at a celebrity golf tournament in Lake Tahoe and alleged that he flirted with her, asked her for her number and invited her to his penthouse suite. She said she "didn't feel right going alone" so she took two colleagues with her. 

Trump grabbed all of the women "tightly in a hug" and kissed them without their permission when they entered the room, she said. 

Drake said after she left, several invitations that night to meet with Trump followed that she declined. First a man called her; then the businessman did, she said.  

"Donald then asked me, 'What do you want? How much?'" Drake said of a phone conversation. 

After that, Drake claims another call came from "either Donald" or someone on Trump's behalf offering her $10,000 which she also declined. 

She also claimed that Trump even offered her the use of his private jet so she could return to work in Los Angeles afterward. 

Drake said she told some friends afterward what happened and that she might be a "tiny grain of sand but clearly this is an enormous beach." 

"I am choosing to share my personal exchange in light of the recently released tapes in order to lend my voice, my strength and my support to the other women who are coming forward," Drake said. 

Trump, who has has denied all past claims of sexual misconduct, said Drake's story "is totally false and ridiculous."

"The picture is one of thousands taken out of respect for people asking to have their picture taken with Mr. Trump," Trump's campaign said in a statement. "Mr. Trump does not know this person, does not remember this person and would have no interest in ever knowing her. This is just another attempt by the Clinton campaign to defame a candidate who just today is number one in three different polls."

The statement went on to reference Trump's claims that Hillary Clinton was allegedly involved in paying people to cause fights at a Trump rallies. An Associated Press fact check found that a selectively edited video released by conservative activist James O'Keefe showed a Democratic operative appearing to boast about provoking a violent reaction. But the activist was not directly employed by the Clinton campaign or Democratic National Committee and both have denounced the comments.

"Anyone who would pay thugs to incite violence at a rally against American citizens, as was released on video, will stop at nothing," Trump's statement said. "Just another example of the Clinton campaign trying to rig the election."

Allred, who previously held news conferences with two other Trump accusers, served as an elected delegate during the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia for Clinton in July. 

A Trump campaign representative last week alleged a "coordinated" attack between Allred and the Clinton campaign, which Allred denies. 

Earlier on Saturday, Trump threatened legal action against every woman who has accused him of sexual misconduct. 

"All of these liars will be sued once the election is over," Trump vowed during a speech in in Gettysburg, adding, "I look so forward to doing that." 

Allred in return vowed an "army of lawyers" would come forward to defend the women should he file a lawsuit and predicted members of the public would fund a campaign on the women's behalf.

Clinton, speaking on her campaign plane on Saturday, called it "not accurate" that her campaign or Democrats were encouraging women to come forward with accusations, The Associated Press reported. 

"I saw where our opponent Donald Trump went to Gettysburg, one of the most extraordinary places in American history, and basically said if he's president he'll spend his time suing women who have made charges against him based on his behavior," Clinton said.

Photo Credit: AFP/Getty Images
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<![CDATA[US Election Will Be 'Brexit Times Five,' Predicts Trump]]> Sat, 22 Oct 2016 00:26:29 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/trumGettyImages-616060152.jpg

Donald Trump held three rallies in North Carolina and Pennsylvania on Friday in which he compared the inaccurate early predictions of Britain's "Brexit" to his own presidential campaign.

The Republican nominee, down in the polls, told crowds the U.S. presidential election would be "beyond Brexit," "Brexit plus" and even “Brexit times five." In June, voters in the U.K. elected to leave the European Union in a result that defied predictions.

Trump over the summer and in early fall has been fond of telling crowds he correctly predicted the outcome of that referendum, NBC News reports.

Trump also took aim at the media again Friday, calling them out for perpetuating a "rigged system" designed to keep him from the White House. "They're the most dishonest people," Trump said of the media. The crowds’ boos turned to chants of "CNN sucks."

Photo Credit: Brian Blanco, Getty Images
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<![CDATA[Counting Down to Voter Registration Deadline]]> Mon, 24 Oct 2016 16:20:04 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/214*120/10-24-2016-VOTE-election-1.JPG

The clock is ticking for Californians who plan to vote in the November election.

Monday is the last day to register to vote. Applications submitted after Monday will be processed, but only for future elections -- not the Nov. 8 election.

Online registration is available by clicking here.

To register, you'll need a California driver's license or ID card number, the last four digits of your social security number and your birth date.

Applications also can be picked up at county elections offices, California Department of Motor Vehicles offices and many post offices, public libraries, and government offices. Call the state's voter hotline at 800-345-8683 to have an application sent to your address.


Phone: Contact the California Secretary of State office at 800-345-8683

Email: Click here to email the California Secretary of State office.

Online: Voter Registration FAQ

Other Important Dates

  • General Election: Nov. 8. Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.
  • Personally Delivered Ballots: Must arrive by close of polling stations on Nov. 8.
  • Mailed Ballots: Must be postmarked on or before Nov. 8 and received by elections office no later than Nov. 14.
Additional Resources

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<![CDATA[With Women as Key Planners, Events at Trump Venues Are Down]]> Fri, 21 Oct 2016 11:27:44 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/marGettyImages-515752270.jpg

There is growing evidence that Donald Trump's mud-slinging is tarnishing his gold-plated name, and industry observers say the Republican presidential nominee risks doing permanent damage to his brand.

"There are certainly groups and event planners shying away [from Trump-related venues] just because they don't want to offend anybody," said David Loeb, managing director and senior real estate research analyst at Robert W. Baird & Co.

Already, the Susan G. Komen Foundation is considering relocating an annual fundraiser held at Trump's Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, NBC News reported. In addition, the PGA announced this summer that it was moving the WGC-Cadillac Championship from the Trump National Doral in Florida to Mexico City next year.

"The majority of the meeting planning community is female, and when you have a candidate who's been very polarizing… it just kind of makes sense that might impact their decision-making," said Kevin Iwamoto, a senior consultant at GoldSpring Consulting. "Planners and buyers are going to vote with their dollars." 

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Ex-California Lawmaker Gets Prison in Bribery Case]]> Fri, 21 Oct 2016 14:02:11 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/california-senator-ron-calderon.jpg

A former California state senator who took bribes in exchange for supporting legislation has been sentenced to 3 1/2 years in federal prison.

A U.S. District Court judge in Los Angeles imposed the sentence Friday on Ron Calderon after listening to the former legislator ask for house arrest instead.

Federal prosecutors had sought a five-year prison term.

Calderon earlier pleaded guilty to mail fraud and acknowledged taking bribes in two instances.

Calderon's "trafficking in his legislative votes" for over $150,000 in cash and other benefits "caused a reverberation of negative effects throughout California and put a stain not just on his career, but on the reputation of the state legislature," Assistant U.S. Attorney Mack E. Jenkins wrote in a pre-sentencing brief.

Jenkins noted that Calderon, a Montebello Democrat, "admitted to participating in two substantial and complex bribery schemes that entailed multiple forms of bribes, concealment and sophisticated money laundering. Here, defendant sold his vote not just to help pay for the expenses of living beyond his means, but for the more banal and predictable aims of corruption -- fancy luxuries, fancy parties and fancy people."

Calderon's attorney has suggested that U.S. District Judge Christina Snyder sentence the 59-year-old former lawmaker to time already served or a period of home detention.

Jenkins proposed that Calderon be sentenced to five years in custody, one year of supervised release, a $7,500 fine and 250 hours of community service.

Calderon's elder brother, Tom, was sentenced in September to a 10-month split sentence of federal prison and electronic monitoring for helping conceal bribe money that his brother received during an FBI sting.

The former Montebello-area assemblyman pleaded guilty to a money laundering count in which he admitted allowing $30,000 from an undercover agent to be funneled through his Calderon Group as payment for his younger brother to support lowering the threshold for California's film tax credit from $1 million to $750,000.

The Calderon brothers were indicted in February 2014 on two dozen counts, including wire fraud, mail fraud, honest services fraud, bribery concerning programs receiving federal funds, conspiracy to commit money laundering, money laundering, and aiding in the filing of false tax returns.

Jenkins wrote that the case was representative of a climate in Sacramento "where waves of dark money infect politics and flood the worlds of many politicians."

Ron Calderon was accused of soliciting and accepting $100,000 in cash bribes, in addition to getting a raft of plane trips, gourmet meals and golf resort junkets in exchange for championing laws favorable to those who paid him and working against laws that could do them harm.

He was suspended from the state Senate in March 2014, and his term in office ended nine months later.

Tom Calderon represented his Montebello-area district in the California Assembly from 1998-2002.

In sentencing Tom Calderon, Snyder said a longer custodial sentence was warranted, but she took into account the 62-year-old defendant's health problems, which resulted in recent triple bypass surgery.

Photo Credit: AP Photo/Rich Pedroncell]]>
<![CDATA[Abortion Becomes Debate Flashpoint With 'Late-Term' Question]]> Fri, 21 Oct 2016 08:34:13 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/AP_16294052406753.jpg

Abortion became a topic in the debates between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump for the first time Wednesday night when moderator Chris Wallace focused on access to what he called "late-term, partial-birth" procedures.

"Well, I think it’s terrible," Trump said. "If you go with what Hillary is saying, in the ninth month, you can take the baby and rip the baby out of the womb of the mother just prior to the birth of the baby.

"And, honestly, nobody has business doing what I just said, doing that, as late as one or two or three or four days prior to birth," he said. "Nobody has that."

Abortion is one of the most polarizing social issues in America. A May 2016 Gallup poll showed that 29 percent of respondents believed it should be legal under any circumstances, 50 percent only under certain circumstances, and 19 percent illegal in all circumstances. Only 2 percent of those surveyed had no opinion.

"Late-term abortion" is a non-medical term that varies in definition. Most laws agree that it encompasses abortions near the end of the second trimester, when viability -- the fetus' ability to exist independently of the mother -- comes into question. There are three methods used in "late-term" abortion: dilation and evacuation, where the contents of the uterus are surgically removed after dilating the cervix; early labor induction; and intact dilation and extraction, in which the fetus is taken out as it appeared in the womb and which is widely prohibited.

According to the Guttmacher Institute, a nonprofit dedicated to the advancement of reproductive rights, only 1.2 percent of abortions in the United States occur after 21 weeks gestation. Despite their infrequency, Columbia University professor Rachel Adams said that "late-term" abortions have been a hot topic in the political sphere and have served as a means for conservatives to promote an anti-abortion agenda.

"It allows you to make a more viable argument that you're talking about a baby and not a fetus, which I think is a more dividing ethical line," said Adams, who specializes in gender and sexuality studies.

Americans' attitudes toward late-term abortion seem to be changing as a result of microcephaly, the birth defect that can be caused by the Zika virus. A July poll from Harvard University and STAT, the Boston Globe's publication about health and medicine, found that 61 percent did not think a woman should be able get an abortion after 24 weeks, while 23 percent did. But if the respondents were told that there was a serious possibility that the fetus had microcephaly caused by Zika, the numbers flipped: 59 percent favored allowing a woman to get an abortion and 28 percent disapproved.

Adams criticized Trump's incendiary language of "rip(ping) the baby out of the womb" for its violence toward women and the use of the charged word "baby" for an unborn fetus.

Others took exception to Wallace referring to "partial-birth abortion" in his question.

"Partial-birth abortion is a political term, it's not a medical term," said Laura Ciolkowski, the associate director at Columbia’s Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality. "The language that we use to talk about abortion really matters."

Terminology aside, Trump's comments revealed a lack of knowledge of gynecological medical practice, according to experts.

"First of all, there’s no such thing as ninth-month abortions," Ciolkowski said. "We call that Cesarean sections."

Lisa Perriera, a staff physician at Philadelphia Women's Center and associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Thomas Jefferson University, called Trump's comments at the debate "completely medically inaccurate."

"Abortion procedures are usually performed until viability, which is nowhere near complete nine-months of pregnancy," she said.

Daniel Grossman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of California, has also told Politifact that if there was a risk to a mother's life on her due date "the treatment for that is delivery, and the baby survives.”

In Pennsylvania, "viability" is legally defined as 23 weeks and six days, but almost all of Perriera's patients have abortions within the first trimester. Among those who don't, it's usually due to a problem with access to healthcare. Because many are on government-issued Medicaid, their procedures aren't covered by insurance and they have to save to be able to afford an abortion, which takes time.

In the rare event of an abortion after 23 weeks and six days, it's often a situation when "the baby is incredibly sick," and the mother finds out late in the pregnancy, Perriera said.

In the debate, Trump said that if his nominees were appointed to the Supreme Court, Roe v. Wade would be reversed "automatically" and issues of abortion would be legislated by the states.

Overturning Roe v. Wade would just make abortion unsafe, according to Perriera.

"It will have really dramatic health outcomes for women," she said. "You will see more women try to self-induce abortion and possibly have an increase in deaths from unsafe abortion."

Cecile Richards, the president of Planned Parenthood, said Donald Trump would block access to Planned Parenthood, attempt to overturn Roe v. Wade, and believed women should be punished for having an abortion.

The comment was a reference a March 30 town hall event when Trump told MSNBC's Chris Matthews that women who had abortions should receive "some form of punishment." He walked back those remarks the same day to say that women should not be punished.

"Make no mistake, Donald Trump would ban abortion in this country," Richards told NBC. "And that's why women will be the reason he's not elected this November."

Ilyse Hogue, president of NARAL Pro-Choice America, said the moment the candidate mentioned reversing the 1973 Supreme Court case "was literally when Donald Trump support bottomed out with independents... His willingness to say that puts him on the wrong side of the vast majority of Americans."

After pushing hard for moderators to ask candidates about abortion access since the primary debates, NARAL activists were thrilled to see Wallace highlight the issue.

"The voters were able to hear a pretty stark contrast in the two candidates," Hogue said.

Some conservatives were annoyed Trump did not directly answer the question of whether he wanted Roe v. Wade overturned.

Evan McMullin, the independent presidential candidate, tweeted: "Why can't @RealDonaldTrump actually say the words 'I want Roe v Wade overturned?' I'm the only pro-life candidate in the race."

Others denounced Clinton’s position.

"Hillary is an extremist on abortion and admitted last night that she is part of a very small, extreme minority of Americans who believe there should be zero restrictions on abortion throughout all nine (months) of pregnancy for any reason," Kristan Hawkins, president of Students for Life, wrote to NBC, emphasizing that she was commenting in a personal, and not official, capacity as a Christian and mother of four.

"While demanding that crimes against children in war torn countries must stop and touting her pro-toddler agenda, she clearly stated that she thinks everyone is worthy of life except children still in their mothers' womb," Hawkins wrote. "You can't claim you are for all rights of women while simultaneously demanding the right to kill pre-born children, half of which are female."

Matt Batzel, national executive director at American Majority Action, tweeted, "Trump: Ripping the baby out the womb, may be okay with Hillary, but is NOT OKAY WITH ME #debatenight #prolife #neverhillary."

However, few pro-life organizations have directly addressed Trump's comments during the debate.

Clinton has taken a position that abortions should be "safe, legal, and rare." In the debate, she emphasized that abortion policy has to take into account the life and health of the woman, especially during "late-term" procedures.

"You should meet with some of the women that I have met with, women I have known over the course of my life," Clinton said on Wednesday night. "This is one of the worst possible choices that any woman and her family has to make. And I do not believe the government should be making it."

Many abortion-rights supporters were cheered by Clinton's performance.

"Hillary did a wonderful job of bringing it back to the real crisis of access in this country," said Hogue with NARAL Pro-Choice America. "We have now a presidential candidate in Hillary Clinton --partly because she's a woman, partly because she's an excellent leader -- (who) has chosen to listen to real stories of women."

Photo Credit: Mark Ralston/AP
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<![CDATA[Trump's Media Attacks: 'Biting the Hands That Fed Him'?]]> Fri, 21 Oct 2016 05:39:24 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-615754408-%281%29.jpg

Donald Trump's increased hostility towards the media is not only a dangerous approach because it erodes voters' faith in the integrity of the electrical system, but the strategy is also somewhat ironic for the former reality TV star. After all, without it, he would never have become the nominee of the Republican Party.

"He's biting the hands that fed him for all those months," said Temple University journalism professor Larry Atkins, author of "Skewed: A Critical Thinker's Guide to Media Bias."

Trump earned close to $2 billion worth of free media attention — dwarfing that of his Republican competitors in the primaries, according to the New York Times, NBC News reported.

Kurt Bardella, Breitbart's former spokesman, said that by setting up a narrative that the media are corrupt, he's building the foundation for another business venture. 

"Everything he says and does — and this has been the case for weeks — has been laying down the case for the rationale for a Trump TV," Bardella said.

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Trump, Clinton Trade Insults at Dinner]]> Thu, 20 Oct 2016 21:14:38 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/DINNER_AP_16295003411913.jpg Bitter presidential rivals Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump had one more face-to-face showdown before Election Day. They tried to make it funny but plenty of the jokes bombed, and some even earned scattered boos. Watch each of the candidates' roasts in their entirety here.

Photo Credit: AP ]]>
<![CDATA[Dem Group to Warn Millennials Third-Party Vote Helps Trump]]> Fri, 21 Oct 2016 04:42:59 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/johnson-stein.jpg

A deep-pocketed environmental group aligned with Hillary Clinton will blanket 1.1 million households in battleground states with mailers warning millennials that a vote for a third-party candidate only helps Donald Trump, the group told NBC News.

The League of Conservation Voters plans to spend $2.6 million before Election Day, most of which will go towards their efforts to prevent Libertarian nominee Gary Johnson and Green Party nominee Jill Stein — polling at about 7 percent and 3 percent, respectively — from siphoning votes away from Clinton.

"There are high stakes for young voters in this election, including the opportunity to meet the climate crisis head-on, and they overwhelmingly dislike Trump. But some may still be leaning towards a third-party candidate instead of Hillary," said LCV National Campaigns Director Clay Schroers. "This is a group of young people who don't want to risk a Trump presidency, and it's important that they know that a vote for anyone but Hillary is a vote for Trump."

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Fact Check: Trump and Clinton's Debate Claims]]> Thu, 20 Oct 2016 09:27:11 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/US-Debate-Fact-Check-CR-147697937763800001.jpg Donald Trump painted an inaccurately dark portrait of manufacturing in America while Hillary Clinton stretched credulity in boasting that her spending plans won't add to the country's debt. Associated Press writer Chris Rugaber breaks down those claims and more.]]> <![CDATA[Karena Virginia Accuses Trump of Groping Her at 1998 US Open]]> Thu, 20 Oct 2016 09:01:08 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/trump-accuser-karena-virginia-147697857243500001.jpg Karena Virginia said Trump touched her breast while she was waiting for a car after attending the US Open tennis tournament in Queens in 1998.]]>