<![CDATA[NBC Southern California - Politics]]>Copyright 2016http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/politics http://media.nbcnewyork.com/designimages/NBC4_40x125.png NBC Southern California http://www.nbclosangeles.comen-usWed, 27 Jul 2016 22:09:13 -0700Wed, 27 Jul 2016 22:09:13 -0700NBC Owned Television Stations <![CDATA[Clinton Joins These Female 'Firsts']]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 17:13:22 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/20160727+elizabeth+blackwwell+victoria+woodhull+first+women.jpg

Tuesday marked a historic moment as former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton became the first woman nominated for president by a major political party. Clinton joined good company when she claimed the "first" title. Here are 13 powerful women who chipped away at the glass ceiling by achieving historic firsts.

Computer Scientist: Ada Lovelace (1815-1852) is considered to be the first female computer scientist. She worked with close friend Charles Babbage on plans for a computing machine in 1834 — they were some of the first people to come up with the concept.

Editor of Major U.S. Newspaper: Cornelia Walter became the first woman to serve as editor of a major U.S. newspaper when she took over as editor of the Boston Transcript in 1842. She was 27 at the time.

American Doctor: In 1849, Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell became the first woman to get a medical degree at an American university.

American Lawyer: Arabella Mansfield of Iowa became the first woman officially recognized as a lawyer in the United States when she passed the bar exam in 1869. Although she did not go on to practice law, she taught at several colleges.

Presidential Candidate: Though she received no electoral votes, Victoria Woodhull ran for president in 1872 as the People's Party candidate — nearly 50 years before women could even vote. She was jailed on Election Day on obscenity charges.

Prime Minister: Sirimavo Bandaranaike became the first female prime minister or president of a country when she was elected as prime minister of Sri Lanka in 1960.

In Space: Valentaina Tereshkova was the first woman to fly in space when Russia's Vostok 6 launched June 16, 1963. Almost exactly 20 years later, Sally Ride became the first American woman to accomplish the feat when the Challenger launched June 18, 1983.

CEO of Fortune 500 Company: Serving as CEO of The Washington Post from 1963 to 1991, Katharine Graham was the first woman to lead a Fortune 500 Company.

Boston Marathon Runner: When Bobbi Gibb's 1966 application to run the Boston Marathon was rejected because she was a woman, she decided to join in anyway. After sneaking into the starting gate, she ran the marathon in 3:21:40.

Military Academy Graduate: Andrea Hollen was the first of 62 women to graduate from West Point University in the class of 1980. She also received a Rhodes scholarship.

Oscar-Winning Director: Winning an Oscar in 2010 for "The Hurt Locker," Kathryn Bigelow became the first woman to win Best Director at the Academy Awards. She was the fourth woman to be nominated for that award.

Head of Major U.S. Sports Magazine: ESPN hired Alison Overholt to be editor of ESPN The Magazine in January, making her the first woman to lead a major American sports magazine.

SEAL Candidates: In light of the recent law change that allows women to serve in more combat military roles, the first female SEAL candidates could start training in late August, according to the San Diego Union-Tribune. That means a female Navy SEAL could be just a couple of years away.



Photo Credit: National Library of Medicine / Mathew Brady, Harvard Art Museum/Fogg Museum]]>
<![CDATA[Read President Obama's Speech to the DNC]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 20:30:48 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/Obama-583835804.jpg

President Barack Obama spoke at the Democratic National Convention Wednesday evening. Here are his remarks as prepared:

Hello, America.

Twelve years ago tonight, I addressed this convention for the very first time.

You met my two little girls, Malia and Sasha - now two amazing young women who just fill me with pride. You fell for my brilliant wife and partner Michelle, who's made me a better father and a better man; who's gone on to inspire our nation as First Lady; and who somehow hasn't aged a day.

I know the same can't be said for me. My girls remind me all the time. Wow, you've changed so much, daddy.

And it's true - I was so young that first time in Boston. Maybe a little nervous addressing such a big crowd. But I was filled with faith; faith in America - the generous, bighearted, hopeful country that made my story - indeed, all of our stories - possible.

A lot's happened over the years. And while this nation has been tested by war and recession and all manner of challenge - I stand before you again tonight, after almost two terms as your President, to tell you I am even more optimistic about the future of America.

How could I not be - after all we've achieved together?

After the worst recession in 80 years, we've fought our way back. We've seen deficits come down, 401(k)s recover, an auto industry set new records, unemployment reach eight-year lows, and our businesses create 15 million new jobs.

After a century of trying, we declared that health care in America is not a privilege for a few, but a right for everybody. After decades of talk, we finally began to wean ourselves off foreign oil, and doubled our production of clean energy.

We brought more of our troops home to their families, and delivered justice to Osama bin Laden. Through diplomacy, we shut down Iran's nuclear weapons program, opened up a new chapter with the people of Cuba, and brought nearly 200 nations together around a climate agreement that could save this planet for our kids.

We put policies in place to help students with loans; protect consumers from fraud; and cut veteran homelessness almost in half. And through countless acts of quiet courage, America learned that love has no limits, and marriage equality is now a reality across the land.

By so many measures, our country is stronger and more prosperous than it was when we started.

And through every victory and every setback, I've insisted that change is never easy, and never quick; that we wouldn't meet all of our challenges in one term, or one presidency, or even in one lifetime.

So tonight, I'm here to tell you that yes, we still have more work to do. More work to do for every American still in need of a good job or a raise, paid leave or a decent retirement; for every child who needs a sturdier ladder out of poverty or a world-class education; for everyone who hasn't yet felt the progress of these past seven and a half years. We need to keep making our streets safer and our criminal justice system fairer; our homeland more secure, and our world more peaceful and sustainable for the next generation. We're not done perfecting our union, or living up to our founding creed - that all of us are created equal and free in the eyes of God.

That work involves a big choice this November. Fair to say, this is not your typical election. It's not just a choice between parties or policies; the usual debates between left and right. This is a more fundamental choice - about who we are as a people, and whether we stay true to this great American experiment in self-government.

Look, we Democrats have always had plenty of differences with the Republican Party, and there's nothing wrong with that; it's precisely this contest of ideas that pushes our country forward.

But what we heard in Cleveland last week wasn't particularly Republican - and it sure wasn't conservative. What we heard was a deeply pessimistic vision of a country where we turn against each other, and turn away from the rest of the world. There were no serious solutions to pressing problems - just the fanning of resentment, and blame, and anger, and hate.

And that is not the America I know.

The America I know is full of courage, and optimism, and ingenuity. The America I know is decent and generous. Sure, we have real anxieties - about paying the bills, protecting our kids, caring for a sick parent. We get frustrated with political gridlock, worry about racial divisions; are shocked and saddened by the madness of Orlando or Nice. There are pockets of America that never recovered from factory closures; men who took pride in hard work and providing for their families who now feel forgotten; parents who wonder whether their kids will have the same opportunities we had.

All that is real. We're challenged to do better; to be better. But as I've traveled this country, through all fifty states; as I've rejoiced with you and mourned with you, what I've also seen, more than anything, is what is right with America. I see people working hard and starting businesses; people teaching kids and serving our country. I see engineers inventing stuff, and doctors coming up with new cures. I see a younger generation full of energy and new ideas, not constrained by what is, ready to seize what ought to be.

Most of all, I see Americans of every party, every background, every faith who believe that we are stronger together - black, white, Latino, Asian, Native American; young and old; gay, straight, men, women, folks with disabilities, all pledging allegiance, under the same proud flag, to this big, bold country that we love.

That's the America I know. And there is only one candidate in this race who believes in that future, and has devoted her life to it; a mother and grandmother who'd do anything to help our children thrive; a leader with real plans to break down barriers, blast through glass ceilings, and widen the circle of opportunity to every single American - the next President of the United States, Hillary Clinton.

Now, eight years ago, Hillary and I were rivals for the Democratic nomination. We battled for a year and a half. Let me tell you, it was tough, because Hillary's tough. Every time I thought I might have that race won, Hillary just came back stronger.

But after it was all over, I asked Hillary to join my team. She was a little surprised, but ultimately said yes - because she knew that what was at stake was bigger than either of us. And for four years, I had a front-row seat to her intelligence, her judgment, and her discipline. I came to realize that her unbelievable work ethic wasn't for praise or attention - that she was in this for everyone who needs a champion. I understood that after all these years, she has never forgotten just who she's fighting for.

Hillary's still got the tenacity she had as a young woman working at the Children's Defense Fund, going door to door to ultimately make sure kids with disabilities could get a quality education.

She's still got the heart she showed as our First Lady, working with Congress to help push through a Children's Health Insurance Program that to this day protects millions of kids.

She's still seared with the memory of every American she met who lost loved ones on 9/11, which is why, as a Senator from New York, she fought so hard for funding to help first responders; why, as Secretary of State, she sat with me in the Situation Room and forcefully argued in favor of the mission that took out bin Laden.

You know, nothing truly prepares you for the demands of the Oval Office. Until you've sat at that desk, you don't know what it's like to manage a global crisis, or send young people to war. But Hillary's been in the room; she's been part of those decisions. She knows what's at stake in the decisions our government makes for the working family, the senior citizen, the small business owner, the soldier, and the veteran. Even in the middle of crisis, she listens to people, and keeps her cool, and treats everybody with respect. And no matter how daunting the odds; no matter how much people try to knock her down, she never, ever quits.

That's the Hillary I know. That's the Hillary I've come to admire. And that's why I can say with confidence there has never been a man or a woman more qualified than Hillary Clinton to serve as President of the United States of America.

And, by the way, in case you were wondering about her judgment, look at her choice of running mate. Tim Kaine is as good a man, as humble and committed a public servant, as anyone I know. He will be a great Vice President, and he'll make Hillary a better President. Just like my dear friend and brother Joe Biden has made me a better President.

Now, Hillary has real plans to address the concerns she's heard from you on the campaign trail. She's got specific ideas to invest in new jobs, to help workers share in their company's profits, to help put kids in preschool, and put students through college without taking on a ton of debt. That's what leaders do.

And then there's Donald Trump. He's not really a plans guy. Not really a facts guy, either. He calls himself a business guy, which is true, but I have to say, I know plenty of businessmen and women who've achieved success without leaving a trail of lawsuits, and unpaid workers, and people feeling like they got cheated.

Does anyone really believe that a guy who's spent his 70 years on this Earth showing no regard for working people is suddenly going to be your champion? Your voice? If so, you should vote for him. But if you're someone who's truly concerned about paying your bills, and seeing the economy grow, and creating more opportunity for everybody, then the choice isn't even close. If you want someone with a lifelong track record of fighting for higher wages, better benefits, a fairer tax code, a bigger voice for workers, and stronger regulations on Wall Street, then you should vote for Hillary Clinton.

And if you're concerned about who's going to keep you and your family safe in a dangerous world - well, the choice is even clearer. Hillary Clinton is respected around the world not just by leaders, but by the people they serve. She's worked closely with our intelligence teams, our diplomats, our military. And she has the judgment, the experience, and the temperament to meet the threat from terrorism. It's not new to her. Our troops have pounded ISIL without mercy, taking out leaders, taking back territory. I know Hillary won't relent until ISIL is destroyed. She'll finish the job - and she'll do it without resorting to torture, or banning entire religions from entering our country. She is fit to be the next Commander-in-Chief.

Meanwhile, Donald Trump calls our military a disaster. Apparently, he doesn't know the men and women who make up the strongest fighting force the world has ever known. He suggests America is weak. He must not hear the billions of men, women, and children, from the Baltics to Burma, who still look to America to be the light of freedom, dignity, and human rights. He cozies up to Putin, praises Saddam Hussein, and tells the NATO allies that stood by our side after 9/11 that they have to pay up if they want our protection. Well, America's promises do not come with a price tag. We meet our commitments. And that's one reason why almost every country on Earth sees America as stronger and more respected today than they did eight years ago.

America is already great. America is already strong. And I promise you, our strength, our greatness, does not depend on Donald Trump.

In fact, it doesn't depend on any one person. And that, in the end, may be the biggest difference in this election - the meaning of our democracy.

Ronald Reagan called America "a shining city on a hill." Donald Trump calls it "a divided crime scene" that only he can fix. It doesn't matter to him that illegal immigration and the crime rate are as low as they've been in decades, because he's not offering any real solutions to those issues. He's just offering slogans, and he's offering fear. He's betting that if he scares enough people, he might score just enough votes to win this election.

That is another bet that Donald Trump will lose. Because he's selling the American people short. We are not a fragile or frightful people. Our power doesn't come from some self-declared savior promising that he alone can restore order. We don't look to be ruled. Our power comes from those immortal declarations first put to paper right here in Philadelphia all those years ago; We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal; that together, We, the People, can form a more perfect union.

That's who we are. That's our birthright - the capacity to shape our own destiny. That's what drove patriots to choose revolution over tyranny and our GIs to liberate a continent. It's what gave women the courage to reach for the ballot, and marchers to cross a bridge in Selma, and workers to organize and fight for better wages.

America has never been about what one person says he'll do for us. It's always been about what can be achieved by us, together, through the hard, slow, sometimes frustrating, but ultimately enduring work of self-government.

And that's what Hillary Clinton understands. She knows that this is a big, diverse country, and that most issues are rarely black and white. That even when you're 100 percent right, getting things done requires compromise. hat democracy doesn't work if we constantly demonize each other. She knows that for progress to happen, we have to listen to each other, see ourselves in each other, fight for our principles but also fight to find common ground, no matter how elusive that may seem.

Hillary knows we can work through racial divides in this country when we realize the worry black parents feel when their son leaves the house isn't so different than what a brave cop's family feels when he puts on the blue and goes to work; that we can honor police and treat every community fairly. he knows that acknowledging problems that have festered for decades isn't making race relations worse - it's creating the possibility for people of good will to join and make things better.

Hillary knows we can insist on a lawful and orderly immigration system while still seeing striving students and their toiling parents as loving families, not criminals or rapists; families that came here for the same reasons our forebears came - to work, and study, and make a better life, in a place where we can talk and worship and love as we please. She knows their dream is quintessentially American, and the American Dream is something no wall will ever contain.

It can be frustrating, this business of democracy. Trust me, I know. Hillary knows, too. When the other side refuses to compromise, progress can stall. Supporters can grow impatient, and worry that you're not trying hard enough; that you've maybe sold out.

But I promise you, when we keep at it; when we change enough minds; when we deliver enough votes, then progress does happen. Just ask the twenty million more people who have health care today. Just ask the Marine who proudly serves his country without hiding the husband he loves. Democracy works, but we gotta want it - not just during an election year, but all the days in between.

So if you agree that there's too much inequality in our economy, and too much money in our politics, we all need to be as vocal and as organized and as persistent as Bernie Sanders' supporters have been. We all need to get out and vote for Democrats up and down the ticket, and then hold them accountable until they get the job done.

If you want more justice in the justice system, then we've all got to vote - not just for a President, but for mayors, and sheriffs, and state's attorneys, and state legislators. And we've got to work with police and protesters until laws and practices are changed.

If you want to fight climate change, we've got to engage not only young people on college campuses, but reach out to the coal miner who's worried about taking care of his family, the single mom worried about gas prices.

If you want to protect our kids and our cops from gun violence, we've got to get the vast majority of Americans, including gun owners, who agree on background checks to be just as vocal and determined as the gun lobby that blocks change through every funeral we hold. That's how change will happen.

Look, Hillary's got her share of critics. She's been caricatured by the right and by some folks on the left; accused of everything you can imagine - and some things you can't. But she knows that's what happens when you're under a microscope for 40 years. She knows she's made mistakes, just like I have; just like we all do. That's what happens when we try. That's what happens when you're the kind of citizen Teddy Roosevelt once described - not the timid souls who criticize from the sidelines, but someone "who is actually in the arena...who strives valiantly; who errs...[but] who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement."

Hillary Clinton is that woman in the arena. She's been there for us - even if we haven't always noticed. And if you're serious about our democracy, you can't afford to stay home just because she might not align with you on every issue. You've got to get in the arena with her, because democracy isn't a spectator sport. America isn't about "yes he will." It's about "yes we can." And we're going to carry Hillary to victory this fall, because that's what the moment demands.

You know, there's been a lot of talk in this campaign about what America's lost - people who tell us that our way of life is being undermined by pernicious changes and dark forces beyond our control. They tell voters there's a "real America" out there that must be restored. This isn't an idea that started with Donald Trump. It's been peddled by politicians for a long time - probably from the start of our Republic.

And it's got me thinking about the story I told you twelve years ago tonight, about my Kansas grandparents and the things they taught me when I was growing up. They came from the heartland; their ancestors began settling there about 200 years ago. They were Scotch-Irish mostly, farmers, teachers, ranch hands, pharmacists, oil rig workers. Hardy, small town folks. Some were Democrats, but a lot of them were Republicans. My grandparents explained that they didn't like show-offs. They didn't admire braggarts or bullies. They didn't respect mean-spiritedness, or folks who were always looking for shortcuts in life. Instead, they valued traits like honesty and hard work. Kindness and courtesy. Humility; responsibility; helping each other out.

That's what they believed in. True things. Things that last. The things we try to teach our kids.

And what my grandparents understood was that these values weren't limited to Kansas. They weren't limited to small towns. These values could travel to Hawaii; even the other side of the world, where my mother would end up working to help poor women get a better life. They knew these values weren't reserved for one race; they could be passed down to a half-Kenyan grandson, or a half-Asian granddaughter; in fact, they were the same values Michelle's parents, the descendants of slaves, taught their own kids living in a bungalow on the South Side of Chicago. They knew these values were exactly what drew immigrants here, and they believed that the children of those immigrants were just as American as their own, whether they wore a cowboy hat or a yarmulke; a baseball cap or a hijab.

America has changed over the years. But these values my grandparents taught me - they haven't gone anywhere. They're as strong as ever; still cherished by people of every party, every race, and every faith. They live on in each of us. What makes us American, what makes us patriots, is what's in here. That's what matters. That's why we can take the food and music and holidays and styles of other countries, and blend it into something uniquely our own. That's why we can attract strivers and entrepreneurs from around the globe to build new factories and create new industries here. That's why our military can look the way it does, every shade of humanity, forged into common service. That's why anyone who threatens our values, whether fascists or communists or jihadists or homegrown demagogues, will always fail in the end.

That's America. Those bonds of affection; that common creed. We don't fear the future; we shape it, embrace it, as one people, stronger together than we are on our own. That's what Hillary Clinton understands - this fighter, this stateswoman, this mother and grandmother, this public servant, this patriot - that's the America she's fighting for.

And that's why I have confidence, as I leave this stage tonight, that the Democratic Party is in good hands. My time in this office hasn't fixed everything; as much as we've done, there's still so much I want to do. But for all the tough lessons I've had to learn; for all the places I've fallen short; I've told Hillary, and I'll tell you what's picked me back up, every single time.

It's been you. The American people.

It's the letter I keep on my wall from a survivor in Ohio who twice almost lost everything to cancer, but urged me to keep fighting for health care reform, even when the battle seemed lost. Do not quit.

It's the painting I keep in my private office, a big-eyed, green owl, made by a seven year-old girl who was taken from us in Newtown, given to me by her parents so I wouldn't forget - a reminder of all the parents who have turned their grief into action.

It's the small business owner in Colorado who cut most of his own salary so he wouldn't have to lay off any of his workers in the recession - because, he said, "that wouldn't have been in the spirit of America."

It's the conservative in Texas who said he disagreed with me on everything, but appreciated that, like him, I try to be a good dad.

It's the courage of the young soldier from Arizona who nearly died on the battlefield in Afghanistan, but who's learned to speak and walk again - and earlier this year, stepped through the door of the Oval Office on his own power, to salute and shake my hand.

It's every American who believed we could change this country for the better, so many of you who'd never been involved in politics, who picked up phones, and hit the streets, and used the internet in amazing new ways to make change happen. You are the best organizers on the planet, and I'm so proud of all the change you've made possible.

Time and again, you've picked me up. I hope, sometimes, I picked you up, too. Tonight, I ask you to do for Hillary Clinton what you did for me. I ask you to carry her the same way you carried me. Because you're who I was talking about twelve years ago, when I talked about hope - it's been you who've fueled my dogged faith in our future, even when the odds are great; even when the road is long. Hope in the face of difficulty; hope in the face of uncertainty; the audacity of hope!

America, you have vindicated that hope these past eight years. And now I'm ready to pass the baton and do my part as a private citizen. This year, in this election, I'm asking you to join me - to reject cynicism, reject fear, to summon what's best in us; to elect Hillary Clinton as the next President of the United States, and show the world we still believe in the promise of this great nation.

Thank you for this incredible journey. Let's keep it going. God bless the United States of America.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Tim Kaine Dad Jokes Take Twitter By Storm]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 20:13:33 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/TimKaine-AP_16194841924998.jpg

The Democratic Party may be losing the beloved goofiness of "Uncle" Joe Biden, but they could be gaining a new cult hero.

Tim Kaine, who was tapped by Hillary Clinton as her running mate, introduced himself to the Democratic Party at large Wednesday night at their national convention. And upon doing so, he struck a chord with many for what they interpreted as his ability to crack a corny dad joke.

And then they took to Twitter:



Photo Credit: AP
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<![CDATA[Governor Jerry Brown Criticizes Donald Trump in DNC Speech]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 21:18:18 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/194*120/JerryBrown9.JPG Among the many criticisms Governor Jerry Brown had for Donald Trump in his DNC speech, his biggest one was Trump's denial of climate change. Conan Nolan reports for the NBC4 News at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, July 27, 2016.

Photo Credit: KNBC-TV]]>
<![CDATA[Trump's Reddit Q&A: Appeals to Youth, Sanders Fans]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 19:46:21 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/TrumpScrantonRally-AP_16209751831494.jpg

As the Democratic National Convention prepared to receive President Barack Obama Wednesday, Republican nominee Donald Trump jumped online for an appearance of his own, answering questions from some of his most ardent supporters on Reddit.

The platform is extremely popular among young people — it's one of the most visited sites on the internet — and Trump was asked what he thinks is the greatest issue facing young people in the United States.

"The question most young people ask me is about the rising cost of education, terrible student debt and total lack of jobs," Trump wrote in response. "Youth unemployment is through the roof, and millions more are underemployed. It's a total disaster!"

Trump answered 11 other questions of the hundreds that were asked on a range of topics including political corruption, Hillary Clinton and space exploration. Trump kept most of his answers brief, and many repeated statements he's made on the campaign trail before.

Most high-profile "Ask Me Anything" sessions are posted on a dedicated Reddit page for them, but Trump's was hosted on a pro-Trump user-created subreddit called The_Donald that attracts millions of views each month, racking up nearly 52 million page-views in March alone, according to MSNBC.

The page, run by anonymous moderators, is unaffiliated with the Trump campaign. The "AMA" was not open to new users and moderators were quick to delete questions from posters who were deemed to be not true supporters.

Among his answers, Trump attempted to make his case for why Bernie Sanders supporters should vote for him instead of Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

"Though Bernie is exhausted and has given up on his revolution, many of his voters still want to keep up the fight. I expect that millions of Bernie voters will refuse to vote for Hillary because of her support for the War in Iraq, the invasion of Libya, NAFTA and TPP, and of course because she is totally bought and sold by special interests," he said, saying his campaign welcomes "all voters who want an honest government and to fix our rigged system."

Trump revealed his presidential role models: George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Dwight Eisenhower and Ronald Reagan.



Photo Credit: AP, File]]>
<![CDATA[Read Sen. Tim Kaine's Speech at the DNC]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 19:24:13 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/TKaine-583832380.jpg

Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine accepted the nomination for vice president at the Democratic National Convention Wednesday evening. Here are his remarks as prepared:

I want to thank my beautiful wife Anne and my three wonderful children, Nat, Woody, and Annella. Nat deployed with his Marine battalion two days ago to protect and defend the very NATO allies that Donald Trump now says he would abandon. Semper Fi, Nat!My parents and in-laws are here, our siblings and their spouses, our nieces and nephews, hundreds of friends from Virginia and beyond, including my great friend, Representative Bobby Scott.We love you all.

Today, for my wife Anne and every strong woman in this country; for Nat, Woody, and Annella, and every young person starting out in life to make their own dreams real; for every man and woman serving in our military, at home and abroad; for every family working hard to get ahead and stay ahead; for my parents and in-laws and every senior citizen who hopes for a dignified retirement with health care and research to end diseases like Alzheimer’s; for every person who wants America to be a beloved community, where people aren’t demeaned because of who they are, but rather respected for their contributions to this nation; for all of us who know the brightest future for our country is the one we build together; and for my friend Hillary Clinton, I humbly accept my party’s nomination to be Vice President of the United States.

I never expected to be here. But let me tell you how it happened.

I was born in Minnesota and grew up in Kansas City. My folks weren’t much into politics. My dad ran a union ironworking shop. My mom was his best salesman. My brothers and I pitched in to help during summers and on weekends. That’s how small family businesses work. My parents, Al and Kathy, taught me about hard work, and about kindness, and, most importantly, faith.

I went to a Jesuit boys school – Rockhurst High School. The motto of our school was “men for others.” That’s where my faith became vital, a North Star for orienting my life. And I knew that I wanted to fight for social justice.

That’s why I took a year off law school to volunteer with Jesuit missionaries in Honduras. I taught kids welding and carpentry. Aprendí los valores del pueblo – fe, familia, y trabajo. Faith, family, and work. Los mismos valores de la comunidad Latina aquíen nuestro pais. Somos Americanos todos.

And here’s what really struck me. I got a first-hand look at a system – a dictatorship – where a few people at the top had all the power and everyone else got left out. It convinced me that we’ve got to advance opportunity for everyone. No matter where they come from, how much money they have, what they look like, how they worship, or who they love.

Back in 1970, in Virginia, the Republican Governor Linwood Holton believed exactly the same thing. He integrated Virginia’s public schools, so black and white kids would finally learn together, and the family enrolled their own kids, including his daughter, Anne, in those integrated inner-city schools.

When Anne went off to college, she brought with her the lessons borne of that experience. And one day, in a study group, she met this goofy guy who had been off teaching kids in Honduras. Anne and I have now been married for almost 32 years, and I am the luckiest husband in the world.

Anne’s parents, Lin and Jinks, are here today, 90-plus and going strong. Lin’s still a Republican. But he’s voting for a lot of Democrats these days. Because any party that would nominate Donald Trump for president has moved too far away from his party of Lincoln. And if any of you are looking for that party of Lincoln, we’ve got a home for you right here in the Democratic Party.

Lin’s example helped inspire me to work as a civil rights lawyer.Over 17 years, I took on banks and landlords, real estate firms and local governments, anyone who treated people unfairly – like the insurance company that was discriminating against minority neighborhoods all across America in issuing homeowners’ insurance.

These are the battles I’ve been fighting my whole life. And that’s the story of how I decided to run for office. My city of Richmond was divided and discouraged. An epidemic of gun violence overwhelmed our low income neighborhoods. People were pointing fingers and casting blame instead of finding answers. I couldn’t stand it. So I ran for city council.

I won that first race, more than 20 years ago, by 94 votes. And I’ve said ever since – if I’m good at anything, it’s because I started at the local level, listening to people, learning about their lives and trying to get results. Later, I became Mayor of Richmond, Lieutenant Governor, and then the 70th Governor of Virginia. I was a hard times Governor – steering my state through the deepest recession since the 1930’s. But tough times don’t last – tough people do. And Virginians are tough. Smart, too.

We achieved national recognition for our work – best managed state, best state for business, best state for a child to be raised, low unemployment, high family income. We shed tears in the days after a horrible mass shooting at Virginia Tech, but we rolled up our sleeves, and fixed a loophole in our background check system to make us safer. And we invested in our people – expanding pre-Kand higher education, because education was the key to all we wanted to be.

Now I have the honor of serving in the Senate. I work on the Armed Services and Foreign Relations Committees to keep us safe at home and strong in the world. I work on the Budget Committee with Bernie Sanders, a great leader, fighting for investments in education, health care, research, and transportation. And I serve on the Aging Committee, making sure that seniors have a secure retirement and don’t get targeted by rip-off artists who will scam them out of their savings or overcharge them for prescription drugs. And here’s a funny thing: I spend time with a lot of Republican Senators who, once they’ve made sure nobody’s listening, will tell you how fantastic a Senator Hillary Clinton was.

My journey has convinced me that God has created a rich tapestry in this country – an incredible cultural diversity that succeeds when we embrace everyone in love and battle back against the dark forces of division. We’re all neighbors and we must love our neighbors as ourselves.

Hillary Clinton and I are compañeros del alma. We share this belief: Do all the good you can. Serve one another. That’s what I’m about. That’s what you’re about. That’s what Bernie Sanders is about. That’s what Joe Biden is about. That’s what Barack and Michelle Obama are about. And that’s what Hillary Clinton is about.

Now, last week in Cleveland, we heard a lot about trust. So let’s talk about trust. I want to tell you why I trust Hillary Clinton.

First, she’s consistent. She has battled to put kids and families first since she was a teenager – in good times and bad, in victory and defeat, in and out of office, through hell or high water. Fighting for underprivileged kids at the Children’s Defense Fund. Fighting to get health insurance for 8 million kids when she was First Lady. Fighting for the well-being of women and girls around the world.

Here’s a little tip for you: When you want to know about the character of someone in public life, look to see if they have a passion, one that began before they were in office, and that they have consistently held on to throughout their career. Hillary’s passion is kids and families. Donald Trump has a passion too: It’s himself.

And it’s not just words with Hillary, it’s accomplishments. She delivers. As Senator, after 9/11, she battled Congressional Republicans to care for the first responders who saved victims of that terrorist attack. As Secretary of State, she implemented tough sanctions against Iran to pave the way for a diplomatic breakthrough that curtailed a dangerous nuclear weapons program. She stood up against thugs and dictators and was a key part of the Obama national security team that decided to go to the ends of the earth to wipe out Osama bin Laden.

Hey, remember Karla, the little girl we heard from on Monday who feared her parents would be deported? She trusts Hillary to keep them together. And remember the Mothers of the Movement we heard from last night? They trust Hillary to keep other mothers’sons and daughters safe.

And as he’s serving our nation abroad, I trust Hillary Clinton with our son’s life.

You know who I don’t trust? Donald Trump. The guy promises a lot. But you might have noticed, he has a habit of saying the same two words right after he makes his biggest promises. You guys know the words I mean? “Believe me.”

It’s gonna be great – believe me! We’re gonna build a wall and make Mexico pay for it – believe me! We’re gonna destroy ISIS so fast – believe me! There’s nothing suspicious in my tax returns –believe me! By the way, does anyone here believe that Donald Trump’s been paying his fair share of taxes? Do you believe he ought to release those tax returns like every other presidential candidate in modern history? Of course he should. Donald, what are you hiding?

And yet he still says, “Believe me.” "Believe me?" Here’s the thing. Most people, when they run for President, they don’t just say “believe me.” They respect you enough to tell you how they will get things done.

For example, you can go to HillaryClinton.com right now and find out exactly how she’ll make the biggest investment in new jobs in generations, and how she’ll defend and build on Wall Street reform. You can see how she’ll reform our immigration system and create a path to citizenship, and how she’ll make it possible to graduate from college debt-free. You can see how she’ll guarantee equal pay for women and make paid family leave a reality. With just one click we can see how she’ll do it, how she’ll pay for it and how we’ll benefit.

Not Donald Trump. He never tells you how he’s going to do any of the things he says he’s going to do. He just says, “believe me.” So here’s the question. Do you really believe him? Donald Trump’s whole career says you better not.

Small contractors – companies just like my dad’s – believed him when he said that he’d pay them to build a casino in Atlantic City.They did the work, hung the drywall, poured the concrete. But a year after opening, Trump filed for bankruptcy. He walked away with millions. They got pennies on the dollar. Some of them went out of business. All because they believed Donald Trump.

Retirees and families in Florida believed Donald Trump when he said he’d build them condos. They paid their deposits, but the condos were never built. He just pocketed their money, and walked away. They lost tens of thousands of dollars, all because they believed Donald Trump. Charity after charity believed Donald Trump when he said he would contribute to them. And thousands of Trump University students believed Donald Trump when he said he would help them succeed. They got stiffed.

He says “believe me.” Well, his creditors, his contractors, his laid-off employees, his ripped-off students did just that. Folks, you cannot believe one word that comes out of Donald Trump’s mouth.Our nation is too great to put it in the hands of a slick-talking, empty-promising, self-promoting, one man wrecking crew.

Don’t take it from me. Take it from former First Lady Barbara Bush. She said she didn’t know how any woman could vote for him after his offensive comments. Or John McCain’s former economic advisor – who estimates Trump’s promises would cost America 3.5 million jobs. Or the independent analysts that found Trump’s tax plan, a gift to the wealthy and big corporations, would rack up $30 trillion in debt.

Or John Kasich, the Republican Governor who had the honor of hosting the Republican Convention in Cleveland but wouldn’t even attend it because he thinks Trump is such a moral disaster. Or take it from the guy who co-wrote Trump’s autobiography. For Trump, he said, “lying is second nature to him.” So, do you believe him?Does anybody here believe him?

The next President will face many challenges. We better elect the candidate who’s proven she can be trusted with the job. The candidate who’s proven she’s ready for the job. And, by the way, I use the word “ready” for a specific reason. When I lived in Honduras, I learned that the best compliment you could give someone was to say they were “listo”– ready.

Not “inteligente”– smart. Not “amable”– friendly. Not “rico” – rich. But “listo.” Because what “listo” means in Spanish is prepared, battle-tested, rock-solid, up for anything, never backing down. And Hillary Clinton is “lista.”

She’s ready because of her faith. She’s ready because of her heart.She’s ready because of her experience. She’s ready because she knows in America we are stronger together. My fellow Democrats, this week we begin the next chapter in our proud story.

Thomas declared all men equal, and Abigail remembered the women. Woodrow brokered peace, and Eleanor broke down barriers. Jack told us what to ask, and Lyndon answered the call.Martin had a dream, Cesar y Dolores said si se puede, and Harvey gave his life. Bill bridged a century, and Barack gave us hope.

And now Hillary is ready. Ready to fight, ready to win, ready to lead. Thank you, Philadelphia. God bless you all.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Protests Continue Into Day 3 at DNC]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 18:59:01 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/214*120/07-27-16DNC.jpg Some Bernie Sanders supporters planned to express dissent when President Barack Obama takes the DNC stage. Mekahlo Medina reports for the NBC4 News at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, July 27, 2016. ]]> <![CDATA[Fact-Checking Donald Trump's Press Conference]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 17:08:09 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/583804964-donald-trump-press-conference.jpg

Donald Trump made several false and misleading statements in an hour-long press conference — on Bernie Sanders, Vladimir Putin, Hillary Clinton’s emails and more.

  • The Republican presidential candidate wrongly said that Sen. Bernie Sanders had “lied” in saying Trump supported a minimum wage below $7.25. In fact, Trump told NBC News in May that he didn’t support a federal “floor” and would leave it up to the states. Sanders got it right.
  • Trump insisted again that Vladimir Putin called him a “genius,” even though Putin clarified just last month that he called Trump “flamboyant.”
  • We found no evidence to corroborate Trump’s claim that Putin “mentioned the N-word one time.” Two experts on Russia told us they had no idea what Trump was talking about.
  • Trump claimed with no evidence that Hillary Clinton deleted emails from her private server “after she gets a subpoena” from Congress.
  • There’s also no evidence for Trump’s repeated claim that “many people” saw or knew about “bombs lying all over the floor” of the San Bernardino shooters’ home and didn’t report it.
  • Trump said Blue Cross Blue Shield in Texas had “announced a 60 percent increase” in health insurance premiums. That’s a proposed increase for 2017 that has yet to be approved by regulators for certain plans purchased by those buying their own insurance.

In the press conference, Trump was right about one top Democrat, Vice President Joe Biden. Trump pointed out that Biden was wrong to say that Trump wanted to “carpet-bomb” in the Middle East to fight the Islamic State. Sen. Ted Cruz said that.

Minimum Wage: Sanders Was Right

Trump claimed that Sanders “lied” in saying that Trump “wants the minimum wage to go below $7.” But Sanders got his facts right. He said Trump “believes that states should actually have the right to lower the minimum wage below $7.25.” And that’s what Trump said.

Today, Trump said the minimum wage should go up to “at least $10,” the first time we could find that he has said that.

First, here’s Trump today at his press conference:

Trump, July 27: The minimum wage has to go up. … At least $10 but it has to go up. But I think that states … I think that states should really call the shots. … But it has to go up. Now, Bernie Sanders lied. Bernie Sanders said in his speech the other day that Donald Trump wants the minimum wage to go below $7. I said, where did he come up with that one?

Trump went on to say, “In fact he was criticized by people that fact check for saying it because I never said it.” We at FactCheck.org did not criticize Sanders on this point. In fact, Trump did say he was in favor of having no federal minimum wage. He was asked by NBC News’ Chuck Todd on “Meet the Press” on May 8, “should the federal government set a floor?” And he responded: “No, I’d rather have the states go out and do what they have to do.”

Here’s Sanders Monday night at the Democratic National Convention:

Sanders, July 25: He does not support raising the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour, a starvation wage. While Trump believes in huge tax breaks, huge tax breaks for billionaires, he believes that states should actually have the right to lower the minimum wage below $7.25.

It may be difficult to follow Trump’s shifting position on the minimum wage: As Todd noted in that NBC News interview, Trump said in one of the debates that he was against raising it — “I hate to say it, but we have to leave it the way it is,” he said in November — and then months later said he would be “open” to raising it.

He even told Todd in May that he “would like to see an increase of some magnitude,” but added that “I’d rather leave it to the states.” However, there is no doubt that he said in that interview that the federal government should not set a floor, leaving states, as Sanders said, “the right to lower the minimum wage below $7.25.”

Here’s the full exchange from that May 8 NBC News interview:

NBC News’ Chuck Todd: Minimum wage. Minimum wage. At a debate, you know. You remember what you said. You thought you didn’t want to touch it. Now you’re open to it. What changed?

Trump: Let me just tell you, I’ve been traveling the country for many months. Since June 16th. I’m all over. Today I’m in the state of Washington, where the arena right behind me, you probably hear, is packed with thousands and thousands of people. I’m doing that right after I finish you.

I have seen what’s going on. And I don’t know how people make it on $7.25 an hour. Now, with that being said, I would like to see an increase of some magnitude. But I’d rather leave it to the states. Let the states decide. Because don’t forget, the states have to compete with each other. So you may have a governor —

Todd: Right. You want the fed– but should the federal government set a floor, and then you let the states–

Trump: No, I’d rather have the states go out and do what they have to do. And the states compete with each other, not only other countries, but they compete with each other, Chuck. So I like the idea of let the states decide. But I think people should get more. I think they’re out there. They’re working. It is a very low number. You know, with what’s happened to the economy, with what’s happened to the cost. I mean, it’s just– I don’t know how you live on $7.25 an hour. But I would say let the states decide.

Putin Still Didn’t Call Trump a Genius

Trump continues to insist that Vladimir Putin called him a “genius,” even though Russian language experts told us Putin merely called Trump “colorful” or “bright” — depending on the translation — and even after Putin clarified just last month that he never called Trump a genius.

Trump, July 27: I never met Putin, I don’t know who Putin is. He said one nice thing about me. He said I’m a genius.

Trump frequently claims that Putin called him a genius, but as we wrote on June 17, that relies on a faulty translation of the Russian president’s faint praise for Trump during a press scrum in December, after Putin was asked what he thought about the Republican candidate.

According to a translation by Russia Insider, which uploaded the video, Putin responded, “He’s a very colorful person. Talented, without any doubt. But it’s not our affair to determine his worthiness — that’s up to the United States voters. But he is absolutely the leader in the presidential race. He wants to move to a different level of relations, to more solid, deeper relations with Russia. And how can Russia not welcome that — we welcome that. As for his internal political issues and the turn of speech which he uses to raise his popularity, I repeat, it’s not our affair to evaluate them.”

It’s the word “colorful” in the first sentence of that translation that is at issue here. We reached out to several Russian language experts, and there was some disagreement about the precise meaning of Putin’s phrase, with some translating it as “colorful,” others “bold” or “bright.” But they all agreed that Trump was inflating Putin’s rather guarded praise, and that Putin most certainly did not go so far as to call Trump a “genius.”

In a speech in St. Petersburg, Russia, on June 17, Putin set the record straight, explaining that he had only described Trump as “flamboyant.” According to Reuters, Putin added, with a smile, “He is, isn’t he? I did not give any other assessment of him.”

Putin Used the N-Word?

We could find no evidence to corroborate Trump’s claim that Putin “mentioned the N-word one time,” in a sign of “a total lack of respect for President Obama.”

Trump: Putin has said things over the last year that are really bad things. OK? He mentioned the N-word one time. I was shocked to hear him mention the N-word. You know what the ‘N’ word is, right? He mentioned it. I was shocked. He has a total lack of respect for President Obama. Number one, he doesn’t like him. And number two, he doesn’t respect him. I think he’s going to respect your president if I’m elected. And I hope he likes me.

We scoured the internet and published reports archived by Lexis-Nexis and could not find where Putin ever used that racial epithet. Neither could the Washington Post or CNN, which wrote, “There are no published reports to back up Trump’s allegation about Putin’s use of the racially derogatory term, however.”

Two experts on Russia told us via email that they had never heard of Putin using that term.

“In Russian, the N-word does not begin with ‘N’ — and Putin’s English is pretty rudimentary,” said Stephen Sestanovich, an expert on Russia and the former Soviet Union at the Council on Foreign Relations.

“I have no idea what [Trump] is talking about,” added Fiona Hill, an expert on Russian affairs and director of the Center on the United States and Europe and a senior fellow in the foreign policy program at the Brookings Institution. “Putin doesn’t really speak English. So perhaps Trump is referring to some speech in Russian–but again I have no idea what he is referring to.”

Hill, who co-authored the second edition of “Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin,” added, “If it were something in Russian, then the word ‘negr’ is used widely by Russians who grew up in the Soviet era. It is the literal translation of Negro. When I was a student in the USSR in the late 1980s I heard it many times, used by teachers and students at my institute when talking about Africans and oppressed black Americans, and it was written in textbooks. I have heard it used by Russians of Putin’s generation since, including a couple of Russian officials in conversations. It does sound pretty similar to the “N” word to an English speaker, so it would certainly be shocking out of context.”

We did come across an article posted by the Conservative Tribune, which carried the headline “While Talking ISIS Strategy, Putin Just Dropped The “N” Word… This Could Change EVERYTHING.” But as the article quickly makes clear, the N-word in question there was “nuclear.”

Conservative Tribune: Russian President Vladimir Putin has not ruled out the possibility of deploying nuclear warheads when dealing with the Islamic State group, but he hoped it would never come that.

But the context of Trump’s comment makes clear that that’s not the N-word to which Trump was referring.

Clinton’s Emails

Trump claimed that Hillary Clinton deleted 33,000 emails from the private server she used as secretary of state after she received a congressional subpoena requesting her emails. But there is no evidence to support his claim. In fact, an FBI investigation found no evidence of a cover-up.

Trump: That a person in our government, Katy, would delete or get rid of 33,000 emails. That gives me a big problem. After she gets a subpoena. She gets subpoenaed, and she gets rid of 33,000 emails? That gives me a problem.

Trump, of course, is referring to Clinton’s use of a personal email system for government businesses. As we have written in “A Guide to Clinton’s Emails,” the State Department asked her in the summer of 2014 to turn over any work-related emails that she had in her possession after she had already left the department in February 2013. Her lawyers went through the emails stored on her server, and they identified 30,490 work-related emails and 31,830 private emails.

In December 2014, Clinton gave the State Department the work-related emails, and the others were deleted. But when did she delete them? We don’t know — and neither does Trump.

Clinton received a subpoena from the House Select Committee on Benghazi on March 4, 2015. The committee requested “any and all documents and communications in your possession.” The request came two days after the New York Times broke the story that she had been using a private email account exclusively for government business.

Six days after receiving a subpoena, Clinton held a press conference on March 10, 2015, to answer questions raised by the Times article. At that press conference, she first disclosed that she deleted her personal emails. “I didn’t see any reason to keep them,” she said.

Trump is assuming that the emails were deleted after March 4, when Clinton was subpoenaed, and perhaps before March 10, when she held her press conference. But her campaign told us for a previous article that the emails were deleted before March 4, although it did not provide us with a date.

FBI Director Jim Comey at a July 5 press conference announced the results of the agency’s investigation into whether Clinton or anyone on her staff violated federal law in the handling of classified information on a private server. He criticized Clinton and her staff for being “extremely careless in their handling of very sensitive, highly classified information,” but cleared them of any criminal wrongdoing.

In his press conference, Comey said the FBI “discovered several thousand work-related e-mails that were not in the group of 30,000 that were returned by Secretary Clinton” to the State Department. He also said Clinton’s lawyers cleaned her server “in such a way as to preclude complete forensic recovery,” but he also said the FBI “found no evidence that any of the additional work-related emails were intentionally deleted in an effort to conceal them.”

Health Insurance Premiums

Trump said Blue Cross Blue Shield in Texas had “announced a 60 percent increase” in health insurance premiums under Obamacare. To be clear, that’s a proposed increase for 2017 — it has to be approved by regulators — for certain plans purchased by those buying their own insurance.

Trump:In Texas, going through BlueCross/BlueShield they just announced a 60 percent increase. On November 1st, you’re going to have new numbers come out for Obamacare, having to do with increases. President Obama is trying to get it moved to December. Because it is election-defying. It is going to be a massive number, the biggest number ever in our country’s history for health care.

Trump has cherry-picked high rate increases for some plans on the Affordable Care Act’s insurance marketplaces before. As we wrote in April on this issue, there was wide variation in premium changes for plans that individuals purchase on the marketplaces — ranging from the high increases Trump has touted to double-digit decreases.

In this case, Blue Cross Blue Shield in Texas has requested rate increases of 57 percent and 59 percent. Any increase above 10 percent has to be submitted and approved by government regulators. A 60 percent jump could well be an outlier. The nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation analyzed preliminary rates and estimated a 10 percent rise on average for the second-lowest-cost silver plan in 14 major metropolitan areas.

That’s double what KFF found actually happened in those metro areas — a 5 percent increase — for 2016. Experts have said the marketplace premiums initially came in lower than expected, in 2014, and now are being adjusted based on insurers’ actual experience with consumers. The Urban Institute wrote in November 2015 that it could take a few years before premiums stabilize.

Consumers can switch plans, and many do: The Department of Health and Human Services found 43 percent of returning customers chose a different plan for 2016. And 85 percent of customers qualified for tax credits, insulating them from higher rate hikes.

We can’t predict whether the final increases for the 2017 marketplace plans will be “the biggest number ever in our country’s history,” as Trump claims. But we’ll note that increases on the individual market before the ACA was passed topped 10 percent on average.

Those buying plans on the marketplaces totaled nearly 13 million in 2016. In contrast, more than 154 million people get health insurance through their employers. Those premiums rose an average of 4 percent for family plans in 2015, according to the latest employer survey by KFF.

San Bernardino Shooting

Trump repeated his claim that “many people” saw or knew there were “bombs lying all over the floor” of the San Bernardino shooters’ home and didn’t report it. There’s no evidence of that.

Trump: I think that the people in the community know what’s going on. Whether it’s in a mosque or whether it’s in the community and they have to report these people. When you look at San Bernardino, people knew — many people knew what was going on. They had bombs lying all over the floor. … I mean, this isn’t — you walk into somebody’s house, there are bombs lying on the floor — I think there’s a problem there. You got to report it.

Trump made a similar claim in mid-June about Muslims being complicit in the Dec. 2, 2015, shooting in San Bernardino, California. He said that “many people,” including neighbors of the shooters, saw “bombs all over the floor” of the couple’s apartment, but declined to report it because of concerns about racial profiling. As we wrote then, one friend of a neighbor said the neighbor noticed a lot of packages arriving at the house, and that the couple had been doing a lot of work in their garage — and the neighbor didn’t report it due to racial profiling concerns.

During the fifth Republican debate in December, Trump accused the mother of the shooter of having advance knowledge of the attack. The FBI was investigating the matter, but officials have not brought any charges or made any accusation against the mother, whose lawyer says that his client didn’t know what her son was planning.

Trump Right About Biden

Trump said that Biden “lied” when Biden said Trump stated that he wanted to “carpet-bomb” in the Middle East to fight the Islamic State. Biden was incorrect. Sen. Ted Cruz, not Trump, said that the U.S. should use carpet-bombing as a strategy against the terrorist organization known as ISIS.

Trump: Joe Biden lied today. He said that Donald Trump wants to carpet-bomb — he was on television — he said, Donald Trump wants to carpet-bomb the enemy in the Middle East. Now, that was Ted Cruz that said that. That was not Donald Trump.

Here’s what Biden said about Trump during an interview on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” on July 27 (at 7:10 in the video):

Biden, July 27: And some of the things he says. Like, for example, I know he’s trying to be tough, but he’s gonna go out and carpet-bomb. You want to go out and make friends and influence people in the Middle East? You’re gonna go carpet-bomb innocent people and bad people at the same time and that’s going to help us fight against ISIS and Daesh?

We can’t say whether Biden “lied,” as Trump said. That would mean that Biden knew what he was saying was false. But Biden did get it wrong.

It was Cruz, the Texas senator and former Republican candidate for president, who talked about carpet-bombing ISIS.

“We will have a president who will make clear we will utterly destroy ISIS. We will carpet-bomb them into oblivion. I don’t know if sand can glow in the dark, but we’re going to find out,” Cruz said during a campaign event in Iowa on Dec. 5, 2015.

Carpet-bombing, generally, involves dropping many bombs over an area without a specific target. Such a tactic could result in unintended casualties since some ISIS fighters are embedded among civilian populations. That’s one of the reasons that former Defense Secretary Robert Gates said that Cruz’s plan would not work.

“I think most rhetoric about carpet-bombing, about making the sand glow, about bombing them to death and so on is frankly just unrealistic,” Gates said in an interview on Fox Business Network in January.

Gates added: “It’s not going to accomplish the military objective — it takes no account of civilian casualties. It’s a simplistic answer to what’s a complex and long term problem.”

For his part, Trump has said multiple times that he would use bombs against ISIS. But he has said that he would specifically target oil fields that ISIS controls in Iraq, Syria and other areas.

On June 17, 2015, a day after he announced that he was running for president, Trump told ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos that “I would bomb the hell out of them. I’d bomb the fields.”

Nearly a month later, he told CNN’s Anderson Cooper the same thing. “If I win, I would attack those oil sites that are controlled … by ISIS,” Trump said.

In mid-November, the Trump campaign released a radio ad in which Trump says, in a voice-over, “Yes, I will quickly and decisively bomb the hell out of ISIS.” That was after Trump, at a campaign rally in Iowa, on Nov. 12, said this:

Trump, Nov. 12, 2015: ISIS is making a tremendous amount of money because they have certain oil camps, right? They have certain areas of oil that they took away. They have some in Syria, some in Iraq. I would bomb the s— out of them. I would just bomb those suckers. And that’s right, I’d blow up the pipes. I’d blow up the refinery. I’d blow up every single inch. There would be nothing left.

So, Trump has called for specifically targeting ISIS-controlled oil fields. A strategy that some in the military have criticized. But that’s different from carpet-bombing, which is what Biden wrongly said Trump wants to do.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Trump Wants Female President, 'Just Not' Clinton]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 16:42:36 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/TrumpScrantonRally-AP_16209751831494.jpg

Speaking to supporters in Pennsylvania, Donald Trump warned women to be “careful what they wished” for if they were supporting Hillary Clinton in her bid to become the first female president, NBC News reported. 

That’s not to say Trump doesn’t want to see a woman commander-in-chief someday. It’s just that he doesn’t want it to be Hillary Clinton. 

Trump told the crowd “they’ll say 'Madame President' — oh, I don't want to hear that. I do want to hear it eventually, 'cause I want to see a woman become President, but it can't be her. She's a disaster. She's a disaster." 

Trump inspired cheers with the phrase “crooked Hillary" at the rally in Scranton, which brought out some of the most enthusiastic supporters in weeks. 



Photo Credit: AP]]>
<![CDATA[Fact Check: Trump Blasts Kaine for Syrian Refugee Plan]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 15:07:19 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-583519916.jpg

FactCheck.org is a non-partisan non-profit organization that will hold candidates and key figures accountable during the 2016 presidential campaign. FactCheck.org will check facts of of speeches, advertisements and more for NBC.

Donald Trump falsely claims that Tim Kaine signed a letter recently asking to bring in even more Syrian refugees to the U.S. than Hillary Clinton has proposed. But Kaine recently only asked President Obama to honor his commitment to bring in 10,000 Syrian refugees.

Trump made his claim at the VFW National Convention on the night before Kaine is scheduled to accept the vice presidential nomination at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

Trump, July 26: Hillary Clinton wants to bring in, if you can believe this, 550 percent more [Syrian refugees] than President Obama. More. And Tim Kaine wrote a letter very recently asking for more than even Hillary wants.

Trump frequently notes that Clinton wants to increase the number of Syrian refugees — above what Obama has authorized — by 550 percent. Clinton has said that she would admit as many as 65,000 refugees from Syria, which is a 550 percent increase from the 10,000 Syrian refugees that Obama said that he would authorize for admission in fiscal year 2016.

But did Kaine recently pen a letter seeking to admit even more Syrian refugees than Clinton called for? We reached out to the Trump campaign for support for the claim, but we did not hear back. And we could find no evidence of a letter that backs up Trump’s claim.

On May 18, Kaine was one of 26 senators who signed a letter to Obama calling on him to honor his pledge to resettle at least 10,000 Syrian refugees in the U.S. this fiscal year. In the first seven months of the fiscal year so far, they noted, only 1,736 Syrians had been admitted to the U.S.

Letter to Obama, May 18: "Last September you announced a plan to resettle at least 10,000 Syrian refugees in the United States during fiscal year 2016. We appreciate your recent affirmation that 'we can hit those marks before the end of the year.'

Nonetheless, we are deeply concerned about the slow pace of admissions for Syrian refugees in the first seven months of the fiscal year. During this timeframe only 1,736 Syrian refugees were admitted to the United States. By contrast, more than 6,000 refugees have been admitted from Burma, more than 5,000 refugees have been admitted from both the Democratic Republic of Congo and Somalia, and more than 4,000 refugees have been admitted from Iraq. To fulfill the commitment you announced last year, at least 8,264 Syrian refugees would need to be admitted during the remaining five months of the fiscal year. We would appreciate an update on specific measures your Administration plans to take to fulfill its stated commitment to resettle the additional Syrian refugees by the end of September 2016."

Kaine’s figure on the number of Syrian refugees accepted in the first seven months of the fiscal year was correct, but we note that in the two months since then, the U.S. accepted an additional 3,475 refugees from Syria, bringing the total for the first nine months to 5,211 as of the end of June. The letter makes the case for the need for the U.S. to open its doors to Syrian refugees, but does not place a figure on an appropriate number, let alone call for more than Clinton has.

Kaine has long made the case that the U.S. has a moral responsibility to take in more Syrian refugees.

In April 2015, Kaine, a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, along with Sens. Dick Durbin, Lindsey Graham and John McCain, sent a letter calling on Obama to create and enforce humanitarian safe zones to protect Syrian refugees.

The following month, on May 21, 2015, Kaine was among 14 senators who wrote to Obama, urging him to significantly increase the number of Syrian refugees allowed to resettle in the United States.

The letter asks Obama to accept “at least 50 percent of Syrian refugees whom UNHCR [United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees] is seeking to resettle.” The UNHCR was seeking to resettle 130,000 Syrian refugees over the next two years — so that comes to 65,000 refugees, the same number that Clinton proposed accepting.

Letter to Obama, May 14, 2015: "Indeed, we cannot expect countries hosting Syrian refugees to continue shouldering such a disproportionate burden if the United States and other industrialized countries do not begin resettling many more Syrian refugees. UNHCR is seeking to resettle 130,000 Syrian refugees over the next two years and has thus far submitted more than 12,000 resettlement cases to the United States for consideration. …

Following the international community’s tragic failure to shelter Jewish refugees fleeing Nazi genocide, the United States played a leadership role in establishing the international legal regime for the protection of refugees. Since that time, the American people have generously welcomed millions of refugees fleeing war and totalitarian regimes. In keeping with this history, we urge your Administration to work to accept at least 50 percent of Syrian refugees whom UNHCR is seeking to resettle, consistent with our nation’s traditional practice under both Republican and Democratic Presidents."

After the ISIS attacks in Paris, Kaine also warned that those attacks should not discourage the U.S. from accepting Syrian refugees.

Kaine, Nov. 18, 2015: "And of course we must have the toughest screening process possible in terms of refugees coming here. But I worry that calls to end or pause our refugee resettlement program are misguided. The fact is that refugees are currently subject to the absolute highest level of security checks of any category of traveler coming to the U.S. — with special criteria in place for those coming from Syria on top of the normal procedures. Getting admitted as a refugee generally takes more than a year and a half and involves signoff from numerous agencies including the National Counterterrorism Center, the CIA, the FBI, Homeland Security, the State Department and the Department of Defense.

Bottom line – it’s not easy to come into our country as a refugee, at all. But the notion of “no Syrian can ever come here” is antithetical to our values – especially when the innocent civilians and families seeking refuge in our country are fleeing the very violence and terror we saw in France and Lebanon that they experience every day in Syria."

So Kaine has a well-documented history of advocating the U.S. take in Syrian refugees. But we couldn’t find any evidence that he supports bringing in more than Clinton has proposed, nor that he wrote a recent letter to that effect.



Photo Credit: Sara D. Davis/Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Bernie Supporters Continue to Protest Outside DNC]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 13:21:25 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/Bernie_Supporters_Continue_to_Protest_After_Senator_Ends_Presidential_Bid_1200x675_733333571941.jpg Protestors hit the streets again on the third day of the Democratic National Convention, holding signs that read, ‘Stop Stealing Our Elections!’ They are protesting the Democratic National Committee after Bernie Sanders ended his presidential bid on Tuesday. Mekahlo Medina reports for the NBC4 News at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, July 27, 2016. ]]> <![CDATA[Tim Kaine's Left Eyebrow Captures Attention]]> Tue, 26 Jul 2016 15:37:13 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/072616+tim+kaine+eyebrow+button.jpg

As Virginia delegates root for Sen. Tim Kaine at the Democratic National Convention, they also are poking good-natured fun at a distinctive part of his face -- his left eyebrow.

Virginia delegates cheered on the senator carrying vivid orange signs bearing a smiley face with the left eyebrow cocked, just like Kaine's.

Delegate Vivian Paige explained.

"Tim Kaine gave us these in 2008, at the convention. He was governor at that point," she said.

Kaine's eyebrow first rose to national prominence in 2006, when the newly sworn-in governor delivered the State of the Union response. His arched eyebrow grabbed attention. Not all of it was positive. 

"... That eyebrow is too distracting for the party to ever put him on national television again," political blogger Brendan Nyhan commented at the time.

His fans in Virginia said they have observed the eyebrow over the years.

"When he talks, his little eyebrow goes up on one side, so it's a little joke, but he goes along with it. He loves it. He's a good guy," delegate Susan Rowland said.

Kaine himself made the first buttons with the arched eyebrow smiley face, passing them out to Virginia delegates when he spoke at the 2008 convention.

"He's a fun-loving, down-to-earth, everybody-loves-him kind of guy," Paige said. "So, this is him poking fun at himself, and he's pretty good at that."

At the convention this week, delegates may find their vintage buttons now are a hot commodity. But Paige says she will not give hers up.

"Let's just say I would make a few bucks if I wanted to sell it. But I'm not about to sell it. Not now," she said.



Photo Credit: NBC Washington]]>
<![CDATA[Women Who Ran for the Presidency]]> Tue, 21 Jun 2016 11:02:47 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/Presidency-thumb.jpg Hillary Clinton made history as the first woman to become the presumptive presidential nominee of a major political party. But the first woman to try for the White House ran 144 years ago. Here are some of Clinton's female predecessors, who in seeking the presidential nomination, one by one splintered the glass ceiling that Clinton would eventually break.

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Protests, Marches and More from the DNC in Philly]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 16:23:49 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/180*120/GettyImages-583802906-outside.jpg The Democratic National Convention began on July 25 with demonstrators, marchers and supporters battling the sweltering heat in Philadelphia, as the DNC officially apologized to Bernie Sanders amid a fresh email scandal. City officials expect thousands of protesters, delegates and members of the media to be in Philly for the four-day event.

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Sarah Silverman's Twitter Hacked for Anti-Clinton Message]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 06:35:13 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-580958410-dnc.jpg

Comedian Sarah Silverman said Wednesday on Twitter that her account had been hacked, after an earlier message linked to a YouTube video criticizing Hillary Clinton.

"MY TWITTER ACCT GOT HACKED THIS IS NOT ME," Silverman wrote in response to a tweet from 8:48 a.m. ET.

The since deleted post had said "America, are you awakening?" It also included language in the Cyrillic alphabet and linked to a YouTube video from the hacker group Anonymous on April 9 in opposition to Clinton.

Silverman, a former Bernie Sanders supporter, joined Sen. Al Franken Monday night to urge Democratic National Convention delegates to unite behind Clinton.

She also responded to Sanders die-hards who had booed Clinton's name at convention events by saying: "To the Bernie or bust people, you're being ridiculous."



Photo Credit: Getty Images
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<![CDATA[Obama: Clinton More Qualified Than Me, Bill to Be President]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 21:49:32 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-583839280.jpg

Their political fates now entwined, President Barack Obama implored with voters Wednesday to elect Hillary Clinton, appealing to the women, minorities and young people who powered his rise and are now crucial to hers.

Obama told delegates at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia there has never been a man or a woman — "not me, not Bill" — who's more qualified than his former secretary of state to be president of the United States and endorsed her as the woman to finish the job he started eight years ago. 

"Nothing truly prepares you for the demands of the Oval Office. Until you've sat at that desk, you don't know what it's like to manage a global crisis, or send young people to war," Obama said. "But Hillary's been in the room and knows what's at stake."

Exactly 12 years to the day after the obscure Senator from Illinois delivered a rousing speech to the Democratic convention, Obama defended his White House legacy and argued that the former secretary of state would be the best choice to bequeath those policies.

Obama cast Clinton as a candidate who believes in the optimism that fuels the nation's democracy and warned against the "deeply pessimistic" vision of Republican Donald Trump.

"America is already great. America is already strong," he declared to cheering delegates Wednesday night at the Democratic convention. "And I promise you, our strength, our greatness, does not depend on Donald Trump."

In addition to party loyalty, a big motivation for Obama's robust support is deep concern that the Republican nominee can win in November and unravel the president's eight years in office.

Obama acknowledged the economic and security anxieties that have helped fuel Trump's rise, but he argued they don't define the country.

"Through every victory and every setback, I've insisted that change is never easy, and never quick; that we wouldn't meet all of our challenges in one term, or one presidency, or even in one lifetime," Obama said, adding that he's "more optimistic of the future of America then ever before."

Wednesday night's Democratic lineup was aimed at emphasizing Clinton's own national security credentials, a shift from two nights focused more on re-introducing her to voters as a champion for women's issues, children and families. Among those were former Pentagon and CIA chief Leon Panetta, who served alongside Clinton in Obama's Cabinet.

Panetta, citing his experiencing working alongside nine U.S. presidents, said he believes, in this election, Hillary Clinton "is the only candidate that has the experience, judgment and temperament to be Commander in Chief."

Obama, too, was vouching for Clinton's national security experience, recalling their work together during trying times and saying she won't relent until ISIL is destroyed.  

"And she'll do it without resorting to torcher, or banning entire religions from entiring our country," Obama said. 

Touting Clinton's experience and judgment, Obama's speech was a direct rebuttal to Trump's attacks on Clinton at last week's Republican convention in Cleveland, when he claimed her tenure as Secretary of State was marked by "death, destruction and weakness."

In a statement, Trump's campaign called the Democratic Party "disconnected from what's happening in our world," and said Democrats described a vision of America that "doesn't exist for most Americans."

"They resorted to the politics of fear, trying to convince Americans not to vote for change — they spoke on behalf of the big banks and the big elites, not on behalf of suffering Americans," Trump's campaign said.

The Associated Press contributed to this story.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA['Stay Worried': Obama Urges Dems to Take Trump Seriously]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 08:28:05 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/Obama+Russia+Hack+Today.png

President Barack Obama, who's set to address the Democratic National Convention Wednesday night, urged Democrats to take Donald Trump seriously, saying "anything is possible in November." 

"It is the nature of democracy that until those votes are cast and the American people have their say, we don't know," Obama told NBC's "Today" show. 

Back in January, Obama firmly rejected the message of Trump's campaign and said he expected as much from Americans.

Asked by NBC's Savannah Guthrie whether he's now "worried" about Trump's candidacy, Obama replied, "I've seen all kinds of crazy stuff happen."

"I think anybody who goes into campaigns not running scared can end up losing," he said.

"So, my advice to Democrats — and I don't have to give this advice to Hillary Clinton, because she already knows it — is you stay worried until all those those votes are cast and counted because you know, one of the dangers in an election like this is that people don't take the challenge seriously. They stay home. And we end up getting the unexpected."



Photo Credit: NBC News
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<![CDATA[Why Vladimir Putin Hates Hillary Clinton]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 04:45:05 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-151488296.jpg

Russian president Vladimir Putin's admiration for Donald Trump is rivaled by his passionate hate for Hillary Clinton, adding credence to the accusations that Russia is behind the damaging Democratic Party email leaks, former U.S. officials and experts told NBC News.

Putin carries a grudge against Clinton because she has publicly compared him to Hitler and expressed doubts that he has a soul.

Michael McFaul, the U.S. ambassador to Russia from early 2012 to 2014 said Putin "sees some of Clinton's remarks as a personal attack against him and the way he governs his country and how he conducts his foreign policy."

Like other former Obama administration Russia policy experts, McFaul said Putin-sponsored hackers were the most likely culprit in the hacking of 20,000 DNC emails that were posted last Friday by WikiLeaks. Cybersecurity experts also say mounting evidence all points in one direction.



Photo Credit: AFP/Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Fact Check: DNC Day 2]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 03:54:22 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/583559136-hillary-clinton-dnc-video-glass-ceiling.jpg

PHILADELPHIA — On a night headlined by President Bill Clinton’s admiration for his wife — the now official Democratic nominee — there was a less-than-glowing treatment of some facts.

  • Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean claimed that Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s “whole” health care plan was to replace the Affordable Care Act with “quote, ‘Something so much better.'” In fact, Trump has released a seven-point health care plan
  • Bill Clinton said that the United States’ approval rating soared 20 percentage points during the time that Hillary Clinton was secretary of state. But analyses of the U.S.’s global ratings don’t support such a claim.
  • Former Attorney General Eric Holder said “1 in 3 black men will be incarcerated in their lifetimes,” an outdated projection based on the incarceration rate for black males as of 2001. That rate has declined since then.
  • Bill Clinton said that Arkansas schools went from “worst” when he started as governor to one of two “most improved,” and he gave Hillary Clinton much of the credit. The record is mixed: An expert did say in 1992 that the state had made progress, but the The York Times reported then that the state was “still near the bottom in most national ratings.”
  • Sen. Barbara Boxer repeated a convention talking point, claiming that Trump said that “wages are too high.” He was talking about a $15 minimum wage being too high.
  • Dean said that GOP vice presidential candidate Mike Pence “voted to end Medicare as we know it.” Pence did vote for a budget plan that called for a major change to Medicare, but it would have retained a health insurance system for seniors.

Note to Readers

This story was written with the help of the entire staff, including some of those based in Philadelphia who are at the convention site. As we did for the Republican National Convention, we intend to vet the major speeches at the Democratic National Convention for factual accuracy, applying the same standards to both.

Analysis

Trump’s Health Care Plan

Former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean said Donald Trump’s “whole plan” for health care was to replace Obamacare with “quote, ‘Something so much better.'” Dean added: “Six-word plan for health care.” In fact, Trump has more than 1,000 words on his plans for health care on his campaign website.

Dean: Now, Donald Trump has a plan, too. He would rip up Obamacare and throw 20 million people off their health insurance; Donald Trump will take us back to a time when insurance companies could deny you coverage if you have a preexisting condition, or he will take you back to the time where insurance companies could charge you more just because you are a woman. And what is he going to replace this with? Quote: “Something so much better.” “Yuge,” no doubt. That’s it. That’s the whole plan right there. Six-word plan for health care.

Dean was referring to comments from Trump at a debate in February, when he said, “We are going to replace Obamacare with something so much better.” Even then, he went on to say the replacement should rely on private insurance and do something to help low-income Americans. And in March, he released a seven-point plan.

It calls for: repealing the Affordable Care Act, allowing the sale of insurance across state lines, allowing individuals who buy their own health insurance to take a tax deduction for the cost of premiums, enabling health savings accounts that could be used by other family members or inherited by heirs, changing Medicaid to a block-grant program, instituting price transparency, and allowing the sale of imported drugs.

Trump’s plan calls these ideas “simply a place to start,” but it’s far from a “six-word plan.”

The list of proposals doesn’t include subsidies or other aid to low-income Americans. It doesn’t say anything about keeping the ACA provisions that Dean mentions — requiring insurance companies to cover those with preexisting conditions and not charge higher premiums based on gender. And an analysis by the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget supports Dean’s claim that Trump’s repeal-and-replace plan would “throw 20 million people off their health insurance.”

CRFB said that the two aspects of the plan that would increase insurance coverage — selling insurance across state lines and allowing a tax deduction for premiums — would “only cover 5 percent of the 22 million individuals who would lose coverage upon the repeal of Obamacare.” That estimate relies on past figures from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office on the impact of similar proposals.

So far, the number of uninsured has dropped by 15.2 million people since 2008, before President Obama took office, through 2015, according to the most recent data from the National Health Interview Survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Obama administration puts the total who have gained coverage under the ACA at 20 million through early 2016.

U.S. Approval Ratings

Bill Clinton said that the United States’ approval rating soared 20 percentage points during the time that Hillary Clinton was secretary of state. But analyses of the U.S.’s global ratings don’t support such a claim.

Bill Clinton: That’s why the approval of the United States was 20 points higher when she left the Secretary of State’s office than when she took it.

Hillary Clinton served as the United States secretary of state from January 21, 2009, to February 1, 2013.

We asked the Clinton campaign to support this claim, but got no response.

But three different international polls show the country’s approval ratings went up during Clinton’s tenure, but then dipped again before the end of her term, according to an analysis by Bloomberg Politics.

Weighting the poll data from several different countries by their populations, Bloomberg found mixed results.

The Toronto-based GlobeScan poll, which asks whether the U.S. is “having a mainly positive or mainly negative influence in the world,” found that sentiment improved during the first two years of Clinton’s tenure, but fell to nearly the point where it was when she took office.

The Pew Research Center, which asks, “Do you have a favorable or unfavorable view of the U.S.?” found the favorability rating of the U.S. rose steeply in 2009 and continued to improve through April 2010. But then “net favorability fell steeply, and continued to decline until just after her departure,” Bloomberg stated.

Gallup’s U.S.-Global Leadership Project, which asks, “Do you approve or disapprove of the job performance of the leadership of the United States?” didn’t start polling until August 2009, seven months after Secretary Clinton’s start date. Bloomberg found that from August 2009 until the summer of 2011, the Gallup measure declined — and then essentially remained flat for the next two years.

None of this supports former President Clinton’s claim of a 20-point boost in U.S. approval. Furthermore, none of the polls asked specifically about the role of the secretary of State, as opposed to that of her boss, President Obama.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[DNC Day 2: Clinton's Historic Nomination, More Top Moments ]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 12:46:56 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-583550834-dnc.jpg

Ninety-six years after women won the right to vote, Hillary Clinton became the Democratic Party's nominee for president on Tuesday, the first woman to represent a major political party.

"When women succeed, America succeeds," said U.S. Rep. Nancy Pelosi. Pelosi became the first woman to serve as speaker of the House of Representatives in 2007 and served in that role until 2011. 

Here was that historical moment and others on the second day of the Democratic National Convention.

History Is Made
Democrats formally nominated Hillary Clinton for the presidency Tuesday evening, the first major political party to choose a woman as its candidate.

Her nomination ends two hard-fought primaries for her, the first of which she lost to President Barack Obama eight years ago.

The former secretary of state, New York senator and first lady sparks intense loyalty among her backers but also intense dislike, a legacy of the scandals that have plagued her long career.

Her name was placed in nomination in the afternoon by civil rights icon John Lewis, the congressman from Georgia, and Maryland Sen. Barbara Mikulski, the longest-serving woman in Congress.

"Eight years ago, our party, the Democratic Party, nominated and elected the first person of color to ever serve in the White House not just for one term, but two terms," Lewis said. "Tonight, tonight, on this night, we will shatter that glass ceiling again."

Mikulski, who will retire this year, said, "On behalf of all the women who've broken down barriers for others, and with an eye toward the barriers ahead, I proudly place Hillary Clinton's name in nomination to be the next president."

South Dakota put her over the top in votes.

The last state to cast its votes was Vermont, the home of her rival this year, Sen. Bernie Sanders. He said: "I move that Hillary Clinton be selected as the nominee of the Democratic Party for president of the United States."

"The Best Darn Change-Maker"
Former President Bill Clinton described his wife to the Democratic National Convention as the "best darn change-maker I have even known," a woman uniquely qualified to be president. But first he started with the story of how they met as students at Yale Law school.

"She walked the whole length of the library, came up to me and said, 'If you're going to keep staring at me' — and now I'm staring back — 'we at least ought to know each other's name. I'm Hillary Rodham. Who are you?'"

He said he later asked her to walk with him to an art museum.

"We've been walking and talking and laughing together ever since," he said. "And we've done it in good times and bad, through joy and heartbreak. … We've built up a lifetime of memories."

Clinton's speech re-introduced his wife to Americans, detailing her legacy of work on behalf of civil rights, children and families. He talked of her starting a legal aid clinic in Arkansas, getting expanded health care for children after the first attempt at health reform failed, registering voters in Texas and serving as U.S. senator from New York and then secretary of state.

"Hillary will make us stronger together," he said. "You know it because she spent a lifetime doing it."

He said that Hillary Clinton worked with people with disabilities, helping to ensure they had equal access to education.

"She never made fun of people with disabilities," he said, a reference to the Republican nominee Donald Trump, who has been accused of mocking a reporter who is disabled. "She tried to empower them."

Bill Clinton asked: How does the woman he talked about square with the one described by the Republicans?

"One is real, the other is made up," he said.

If you're a hard working immigrant who obeys the law and loves the United States, choose immigration reform over a candidate who wants to send you back, he said. If you're a Muslim who loves the country and freedom and hates terrorism, stay here and help the United States win, he said.

"If you're a young African American disillusioned and afraid, we saw in Dallas how great our police officers can be, help us build a future where nobody's afraid to walk outside," he said.

At the end of the day's session, Hillary Clinton appeared by satellite and told the audience, "I can't believe we just put the biggest crack in that glass ceiling yet."

"And if there are any little girls out there who stayed up late to watch, let me just say: 'I may become the first woman president, but one of you is next.'"

Bernie or Bust? Bust, says Bernie
Earlier, Sanders worked to rein in his backers. A day after they jeered Clinton and protested the leaked emails that showed party officials working to torpedo his candidacy, the senator from Vermont worked to tamp down his die-hard fans’ determination to keep fighting for him. On the second day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, he made the rounds of the state delegations and urged support for his former rival. Donald Trump needs to be stopped, he said.

"It's easy to boo," he told delegates from California. "But it is harder to look your kids in the face who will be living under a Donald Trump presidency."

Not all of his backers listened. Dozens of his delegates walked out of the convention, held a sit-in and pledged to leave the Democratic party in protest. They claimed that their votes had been stolen by the Democratic National Committee.  

Black Lives Matter
A half-dozen women whose children were killed by violence, Mothers of the Movement, endorsed Clinton as a leader who would bring about change and who would support needed gun legislation.

Geneva Reed-Veal, the mother of Sandra Bland, pulled over in a traffic stop in Texas and later found hanging in a jail cell, said Clinton would lead the country to restoration and change.

"She knows that when a young, black life is cut short, it's not just a loss, it's a personal loss," said Reed-Veal, who has said she does not believe her daughter killed herself. "It is a national loss. It is a loss that diminishes all of us. What a blessing tonight to be standing here, so that Sandy can still speak through her mama."

The Texas trooper who stopped Bland was fired earlier this year.

Lucia McBath, whose son Jordan Davis was shot to death in Florida in a dispute over loud music, called the majority of police officers good people doing a good job. She urged building a future where police officers and communities worked together to keep children like her son safe.

"Hillary Clinton isn't afraid to say that black lives matter," McBath said. "She isn't afraid to sit at a table with grieving mothers and bear the full force of our anguish. She doesn't build walls around her heart."

The man who killed her son, Michael Dunn, was convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison without parole.

Joining them was Sybrina Fulton, the mother of Trayvon Martin, killed by George Zimmerman, a neighborhood volunteer. Zimmerman was found not guilty of Martin's death.

"Hillary Clinton has the compassion and understanding to support grieving mothers," Fulton said. "She has the courage to lead the fight for common-sense gun legislation."

Love Trumps Hate
Actresses Lena Dunham and America Ferrera had some pointed jokes for Trump.

Dunham: "According to Donald Trump my body is probably like a '2.'"

Ferrera: "And according to Donald Trump I’m probably a rapist."

Dunham: "But America you're not Mexican."

Ferrera: "And President Obama isn't Kenyan, Lena. But that doesn't stop Donald."

"Love trumps hate," they concluded at the end of their speech.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA['Bernie or Bust' Protesters Rally Outside DNC]]> Tue, 26 Jul 2016 19:30:49 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/Bernie_or_Bust_Protesters_Outside_DNC_1200x675_732788291602.jpg Bernie Sanders supporters rallied outside the DNC in Philadelphia as Hillary Clinton inched closer to the Democratic presidential nomination. Mekahlo Medina reports from Philadelphia for the NBC4 News on Tuesday, July 26, 2016.]]> <![CDATA[Sanders Delegates Walk Out]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 03:15:12 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/216*120/sanders+walkout+rigged+brian+lead+image.jpg

Dozens of Bernie Sanders delegates walked out of the Democratic National Convention Tuesday night following Hillary Clinton's nomination for president, and many promised to leave the political party in protest.

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Vincent Venditti, a Georgia delegate pledged to Sanders, said outside Philadelphia's Wells Fargo Center that he considers himself a political independent effective immediately.[[388324462,C]]

Their protest and exodus is in line with what hundreds of protesters had been saying outside the convention's security perimeter. Many said Hillary Clinton's nomination as the Democratic candidate for president would prompt them to quit the party.

"They know where to find me," Venditti said, noting that he would consider returning to the party if Clinton's candidacy was abandoned.

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The group held a sit-in at a tent for journalists, some with tape over their mouths. It dispersed after about an hour, but the protesters' point was made.

The Democratic Party and their convention have been roiled by an email controversy. Hacked emails published by Wikileaks appeared to show some in the Democratic National Committee favoring Hillary Clinton, a charge leveled throughout the presidential primaries but which party leader Debbie Wasserman Schultz had denied.

But the email scandal led to her ouster on Monday — she had been supposed to gavel in the convention on Monday, but did not do so. Even Sanders was booed at an event Monday, when he told supporters it was in the country's best interest to elect Clinton president.

 



Photo Credit: NBC10 Brian X. McCrone
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<![CDATA[Cheers on Twitter for Hillary Clinton's Historic Nomination]]> Tue, 26 Jul 2016 16:31:19 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-579365810.jpg

Democrat Hillary Clinton made history Tuesday night when she became the first woman to be nominated for president by a major party.

Other women, including Democrat Shirley Chisholm, have sought a major party nomination. And others have made third-party runs.

But after defeating U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, Clinton shattered a glass ceiling.

Supporters took to social media to applaud Clinton for her achievement.

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Photo Credit: FilmMagic
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<![CDATA[Weiner, Trump Jr. Spat Over Possible NYC Mayoral Run]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 11:35:47 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/weiner+trump+jr.jpg

Amid speculation over whether Donald Trump Jr. may be mulling a run for New York City mayor, failed candidate Anthony Weiner offered an opinion that sparked a snarky response from the younger Trump.

Asked by a TV news reporter Tuesday about the possibility of a Trump Jr. run for mayor, Weiner said, "I'd come out of retirement just to beat him like a rented mule." 

Trump Jr. tweeted in response: "Too soon Anthony!!! You probably shouldn't be talking about beating anything ever again. Go back to your cave."

The scandal-scarred Weiner badly lost the Democratic primary of the New York City's mayoral race in 2013. By that time, he'd been caught in two sexting scandals, once in 2011, when he used Twitter to send provocative photos of himself while in Congress, and again in April of 2013, shortly after he announced he was entering the mayoral race. That's when revelations of an online relationship with a woman named Sydney Leathers surfaced. 

Weiner, 51, appeared on "The Late Show With Stephen Colbert" Monday night after The Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, where his wife Huma Abedin -- longtime top aide to Hillary Clinton -- was working.

He told Politico in 2014 his political career was "probably over" and that he planned to stay busy with business, media appearances and his son with Abedin, Jordan. 

Trump Jr., 38, meanwhile, has refused to rule out a run for mayor after his appearance at the Republican National Convention last week. He said on CNN's "State of the Union" show: "As my father has always said, I want to -- we always like to keep our options open." 

Mayor de Blasio said he welcomes the challenge.

"In terms of Donald Trump Jr., I will predict something right here and now," he told Politico. "That his father and his values will be rejected soundly by the people of New York City in November. So, if after that he thinks that it’s a great idea to run against me, be my guest."



Photo Credit: AP/Getty
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<![CDATA[A List of Trump's Rapidly Changing Policy Positions]]> Tue, 26 Jul 2016 14:24:11 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/Trump-Unity.jpg

Donald Trump once offered up three different views on abortion in eight hours, and after a year of campaigning, the Republican nominee has continued to expound powerfully incoherent rhetoric and constantly evolving views.

According to NBC News, Trump and the Republican Party are putting forward the most elusive presidential platform in modern history, and many of Trump's policies conflict with the party's own platform.

 To better understand what the Republican Party nominee believes today — and yesterday — NBC News compiled a list of Trump's views since he announced his candidacy a year ago.

"You have to have a certain degree of flexibility," the nominee said in a March debate when confronted on his evolving policy platform, taking a stance on immigration he'd reverse hours later. "You can't say, it's OK, and then you find out it's not OK and you don't want to do anything. You have to be flexible, because you learn."



Photo Credit: NBC]]>
<![CDATA[Standout Style at the Democratic National Convention]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 16:30:46 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/180*120/GettyImages-583816328-fashion.jpg Many delegates, protesters and attendees donned special garb to show support for a candidate, advocate for a cause, or just show off at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Below are some of the best outfits so far.

Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Sanders Supporters Continue to Protest Outside the DNC]]> Tue, 26 Jul 2016 13:47:37 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/sanders+protest.JPG Despite Bernie Sanders’ efforts to unite the Democratic Party behind Hillary Clinton, protesters continue to gather outside the Democratic National Convention. Mekahlo Medina reports for the NBC4 News at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, July 26, 2016.

Photo Credit: KNBC-TV]]>
<![CDATA[Susan Sarandon, Sarah Silverman Ignite DNC Celebrity Bern]]> Tue, 26 Jul 2016 10:26:35 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/sarandon-silverman.jpg

There's no doubt the Democrats trounced the Republicans in one contest: the Day One convention celebrity lineup. Scott Baio, Antonio Sabato Jr. and Duck Dynasty's Willie Robertson proved no match for the wattage of Demi Lovato, Eva Longoria, Paul Simon and Sarah Silverman.

What's less clear is whether controversy sparked by some of the entertainment-world guests did their respective parties more harm than good.

Donald Trump supporter Baio got called out during an interview with MSNBC for retweeting a vile post slurring Hillary Clinton. Former underwear model Sabato absurdly insisted in an interview with ABC that – despite all evidence to the contrary – his fellow Christian President Obama is a Muslim.

On Monday night, Democratic schisms played out, in part, through the stars. While Simon's poignant croak of "Bridge Over Troubled Waters" sought to heal, comments fired from the convention stage by Sarah Silverman and eye-daggers shot from the crowd by Susan Sarandon threatened to irritate an open wound.

While the duo couldn't overshadow the night's biggest star – First Lady Michelle Obama – the attention Silverman and Sarandon grabbed underscored not only the growing role of celebrities in high-stakes political races, but the unpredictability they bring.

The GOP learned as much in 2012, via Clint Eastwood's bizarre improvised comedy act with an empty chair.

Silverman, a Bernie Sanders fan who is now supporting Clinton, offered a far funnier (including a racy crack about getting a cream for her “Bern”) and nuanced performance. She extolled Sanders and made a case for Clinton, without slamming Trump – normally an easy target for a caustic, left-leaning comedian.

Still, her comic instincts kicked in amid booing by from Sanders diehards, prompting her to react as if she were putting hecklers in their place. "To the Bernie-or-bust people: You're being ridiculous," she said with comedian-turned-senator Al Franken at her side.

While her words likely rang true to many Democrats, they starkly highlighted a lack of the kind of unity party leaders had hoped to project on a night when even pleas on Clinton's behalf from Sanders and his fellow liberal Sen. Elizabeth Warren couldn't ground the boo-birds.

Sarandon, meanwhile, gave voice to the split without uttering a syllable. The Sanders supporter, who told TYT Politics last month that Clinton “in a way” is “more dangerous” than Trump, became an Internet meme after journalist Ian McKenna tweeted a gif of her looking miserable in the Philadelphia arena.  

“Susan Sarandon is having literally the worst time at the #DemConvention,” McKenna noted. Sarandon retweeted the observation, and added: "Accurate."

Her short, if not sweet, tweet likely won't be the final word from a celebrity during a divisive president election cycle in which both parties got humbling reminders that reaching out to the stars brings a risk of feeling the burn.

Jere Hester is Director of News Products and Projects at the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism. He is also the author of "Raising a Beatle Baby: How John, Paul, George and Ringo Helped us Come Together as a Family." Follow him on Twitter.



Photo Credit: WireImage/Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Trump Attacks Hillary Clinton Through Her Husband's Infidelities]]> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 16:48:12 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/GettyImages-538716480-hil.jpg

Donald Trump is running against Hillary Clinton, not her husband, but he has not shied from attacking the former president over his sexual misconduct.

He accused Bill Clinton of rape during an interview in May with Fox News' Sean Hannity, tweeted that Clinton was "the WORST abuser of women in U.S. political history" and called Hillary Clinton an enabler who tried to destroy the women with whom her husband had affairs.

Democrats turned to the former president to make a case for Hillary Clinton at the Democratic National Convention on Tuesday -- and he did, not only as a fighter for children and families, but also as his wife.

"In the spring of 1971, I met a girl," he began, and went on to describe trying to convince her to marry him.

"We've been walking and talking and laughing together ever since," he said. "And we've done it in good times and bad, through joy and heartbreak….We've built up a lifetime of memories."

But Trump wants to remind everyone of Clinton's seamier side and by Wednesday had said: "He left out the most interesting chapter. I won't get into that. The chapter that I really waited for -- because it was really boring -- the chapter I waited for, I never heard. And he left it out."

Trump's impassioned supporters and the many Clinton haters among them might approve, but the Republican nominee is struggling to appeal to women. How will they react to denigrating Hillary Clinton over her husband's infidelities?

Oda Tejeba, a Democrat from Queens, New York, who said she would vote for Clinton, does not like it. She called the line of attack petty.

"That’s like a sucker hit," Tejeba said.

"She was humiliated publicly," she said of Clinton. "If she can get past that, she can do anything."

But Elizabeth Smith, an Ohio alternate delegate for Gov. John Kasich at the Republican National Convention last week, said that if she thought Hillary Clinton were an outstanding candidate with whom she agreed on other issues, she would probably dismiss the infidelities. As it is, the Clintons' behavior is a nagging problem for her.

"You can go back and see whether she was instrumental or not," said Smith, a civil trial lawyer who said she would probably vote for Trump because she wanted to support the Republicans. "They trashed Monica Lewinsky."

Smith said she did not excuse the behavior of Lewinsky, the White House intern with whom Bill Clinton had a relationship, but noted that she was only 22 at the time. 

"[Hillary Clinton's] a smart woman," Smith said. "They talk. Hillary could have done something to pull back on that and they could have pushed it aside but the fact that they didn't as a team tells me something."

Polls show a striking gender gap between Clinton and Trump. Recent NBC/Wall Street Journal/Marist polls of three battleground states show Clinton outpolling Trump among women in Iowa, Ohio and Pennsylvania by 16 percentage points or more. Trump leads among men by a similar margin in Iowa and Ohio, though not in Pennsylvania.

Women appalled that Trump would try to hold Clinton responsible for her husband's behavior are for the most part voting for Democrats, said Christina Wolbrecht, an associate professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame. Those open to the line of attack are for the most part not.

"Frankly I think there’s a big chunk of the electorate that just doesn't care," she said. "It's not clear to me that there's a group of independent women for whom this is going to be the thing."

Once presidential nominees are chosen, partisanship usually determines how 90 percent of the people vote, she said.

"But we're in uncharted territory here," she said. "We've never had a woman at the top of the ticket."

At the Republican convention last week, former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani joined enthusiastically in denouncing the Clintons. He called Bill Clinton "a predator president" and charged Hillary Clinton had gone after his accusers as head of "the bimbo squad."

"You don't care about women, you don't care about feminism," Giuliani said of Hillary Clinton during a breakfast for the New York delegates on Thursday. "You don't even care about your own dignity. All you care about is power."

Sharon Day, co-chairwoman of the Republican National Committee, tried to counter accusations that the attacks on Clinton, the first woman named as the presumptive candidate of a major party, were sexist.

"As first lady, you viciously attacked the character of women who were victims of sexual abuse at the hands of your husband," she said. "I want to see a woman become president one day, and I want my granddaughters to see a woman president, but not that woman, Hillary Clinton. Not now, not ever."

The attacks are meant to mobilize Trump's supporters and remind them how corrupt they found the Clintons.

"It's a base mobilizing thing," Wolbrecht said. "And then often with your opposition it's not so much that you're trying to convince them to vote for you so much as plant enough doubt and uncertainty and discomfort that you dampen down that enthusiasm."

Trump himself has been married three times. His first marriage to Ivana came to an end after he had begun an affair with Marla Maples, later his second wife.

In an interview with Chris Cuomo on CNN in May, said Trump had started criticizing Hillary Clinton in retaliation, after she played the "woman’s card."

"She is playing the woman's card to the hilt," Trump said. "She is going, I watched over the weekend, everything is about 'woman' and 'Donald Trump raised his voice.' And you know it's all nonsense. You know what? Women understand it better than anybody."

A video released by the Trump campaign showed Bill Clinton chomping on a cigar with audio from two women who accused him of sexual assault: Kathleen Willey and Juanita Broaddrick. It ends with a photo of Hillary and Bill Clinton with Hillary Clinton laughing. "Here we go again?" it asked.

Pressed by Cuomo about why he was talking about Bill Clinton's infidelities rather than the issues women care about, he defended his attacks.

"He was impeached," Trump said of Clinton. "And then he lied about it."

Clinton was impeached on charges of perjury and obstruction of justice but was acquitted by the U.S. Senate.

The Clinton campaign has described the attacks as a way to distract from the election's issues and. 

Logan Nevonen, a 23-year-old Republican convention delegate from Texas who supported U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, said she did not approve of the attacks on Clinton.

"I don't appreciate that rhetoric, getting at women with sexist comments and things," she said. "He diminishes everything I stand for."

Trump does not yet have her vote, she said. To earn it, he would have to be less hostile, she said.

Elaine Mcfalos, a Democrat from North Carolina who will vote for Trump, said during a visit to New York City that she did not find Hillary Clinton trustworthy but not because of Bill Clinton's scandals.

"She's a strong woman and everybody in this world has had problems like that," Mcfalos said. "So that doesn’t define her."

But she thought Clinton should have been punished for her use of a personal server for her professional emails while secretary of state, she said.

"Her integrity is in question in my mind," she said.

Another woman, Marcia Freeman of Queens, New York, will vote for Clinton. The criticism directed against her is wrong, she said.

"Any man can cheat," she said. "A marriage is a marriage. I'm a Christian and you forgive and forget."

Freeman said she was "Hillary all the way," and called Trump a racist.

Hillary Clinton weathered similar attacks when she first ran for office for a New York senate seat, against Giuliani. Giuliani ultimately dropped out of the race after he announced he had been diagnosed with prostate cancer and was separating from his second wife.

In an MSNBC interview, Giuliani repeated his criticism of Hillary Clinton's behavior. 

"Very few women would attack Monica Lewinsky for three or four months when it turned out that Monica Lewinsky was quite correct and her husband had in fact taken advantage of her," Giuliani said. "Very few women would do that and to pose as a feminist and to say you care about women who are victims makes you in my view a phony."



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Read Michelle Obama's Speech to the DNC]]> Mon, 25 Jul 2016 21:00:46 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/Michelle-Obama-Convention-GettyImages-580961036.jpg

First lady Michelle Obama spoke at the Democratic National Convention Monday evening. Here are her remarks as spoken:

It's hard to believe that it has been eight years since I first came to this convention to talk with you about why I thought my husband should be president.

Remember how I told you about his character and conviction, his decency and his grace. The traits that we've seen every day that he's served our country in the White House. I also told you about our daughters, how they are the heart of our hearts, the center of our world, and during our time in the White House we've had the joy of watching them grow from bubbly little girls into poised young women. A journey that started soon after we arrived in Washington when they set off for their first day at their new school.

I will never forget that winter morning as I watched our girls, just seven and 10 years old, pile into those black SUV's with all those big men with guns. And I saw their little faces pressed up against the window, and the only thing I could think was what have we done?

See because at that moment I realized that our time in the White House would form the foundation for who they would become and how well we manage this experience could truly make or break them.

That is what Barack and I think about every day as we try to guide and protect our girls through the challenges of this unusual life in the spotlight, how we urge them to ignore those who question their father's citizenship or faith.

How we insist that the hateful language they hear from public figures on TV does not represent the true spirit of this country. How we explain that when someone is cruel or acts like a bully, you don't stoop to their level. No, our motto is, when they go low, we go high.

With every word we utter, with every action we take, we know our kids are watching us. We as parents are their most important role models. And let me tell you, Barack and I take that same approach to our jobs as president and first lady because we know that our words and actions matter, not just to our girls, but the children across this country, kids, kids who tell us I saw you on TV, I wrote a report on you for school. Kids like the little black boy who looked up at my husband, his eyes wide with hope and he wondered, is my hair like yours?

And make no mistake about it, this November when we go to the polls that is what we're deciding, not Democrat or Republican, not left or right. No, in this election and every election is about who will have the power to shape our children for the next four or eight years of their lives.

And I, I am here tonight because in this election there is only one person who I trust with that responsibility, only one person who I believe is truly qualified to be president of the United States, and that is our friend Hillary Clinton.

See, I trust, I trust Hillary to lead this country because I've seen her lifelong devotion to our nation's children, not just her own daughter, who she has raised to perfection, but, butevery child who needs a champion, kids who take the long way to school to avoid the gangs, kids who wonder how they'll ever afford college, kids whose parents don't speak a word of English, but dream of a better life, kids who look to us to determine who and what they can be. You see, Hillary has spent decades doing the relentless, thankless work to actually make a difference in their lives. Advocating for kids with disabilities as a young lawyer, fighting for children's health care as first lady, and for quality child care in the Senate.

And when she didn't win the nomination eight years ago, she didn't get angry or disillusioned. She, Hillary did not, Hillary did not pack up and go home, because as a true public servant Hillary knows that this is so much bigger than her own desires and disappointments.

So she proudly stepped up to serve our country once again as secretary of state, traveling the globe to keep our kids safe. And look, there were plenty of moments when Hillary could have decided that this work was too hard, that the price of public service was too high, that she was tired of being picked apart for how she looks or how she talks or even how she laughs.

But here's the thing. What I admire most about Hillary is that she never buckles under pressure. She never takes the easy way out. And Hillary Clinton has never quit on anything in her life.

And when I think about the kind of president that I want for my girls and all our children, that's what I want. I want someone with the proven strength to persevere. Someone who knows this job and takes it seriously. Someone who understands that the issues the President faces are not black and white and cannot be boiled down to 140 characters.

Because when you have the nuclear codes at your fingertips and the military in your command, you can't make snap decisions, you can't have a thin skin or a tendency to lash out, you need to be steady and measured and well-informed. I want a President with a record of public service, someone whose life's work shows our children that we don't chase fame and fortune for ourselves, we fight to give everyone a chance to succeed. And we give back, even when we're struggling ourselves, because we know that there is always someone worse off. And there but for the grace of God go I.

I want a president who will teach our children that everyone in this country matters. A President who truly believes in the vision that our founders put forth all those years ago, that we are all created equal, each a loved part of the great American story. And when crisis hits, we don't turn against each other. No, we listen to each other, we lean on each other. Because we are always stronger together.

And I am here tonight because I know that that is the kind of President that Hillary Clinton will be and that's why in this election, I'm with her.

You see, Hillary understands that the President is about one thing and one thing only. It's about leaving something better for our kids. That's how we've always moved this country forward by all of us coming together on behalf of our children.

Folks who volunteered to coach that team, to teach that Sunday school class, because they know it takes a village. Heroes of every color and creed who wear the uniform and risk their lives to keep passing down those blessings of liberty. Police officers and protesters in Dallas, who all desperately want to keep our children safe.

People who lined up in Orlando to donate blood because it could've been their son, their daughter in that club.

Leaders like Tim Kaine who show, who show our kids what decency and devotion look like. Leaders like Hillary Clinton who has the guts and the grace to keep coming back and putting those cracks in that highest and hardest glass ceiling until she finally breaks through. Lifting all of us along with her.

That is the story of this country, the story that has brought me to the stage tonight. The stories of generations of people who felt the lash of bondage, the shame of servitude, the sting of segregation, but who kept on striving and hoping and doing what needed to be done so that today I wake up every morning a house that was built by slaves.

And I watch my daughters, two beautiful intelligent black young women playing with their dogs on the White House Lawn.

And because of Hillary Clinton my daughters and all our sons and daughters now take for granted that a woman can be President of the United States.

So look. So don't let anyone ever tell you that this country isn't great. That somehow we need to make it great again. Because this right now is the greatest country on earth.

And as my daughters prepare to set out into the world I want a leader who is worthy of that truth. A leader who is worthy of my girl's promise and all of our kids promise. A leader who will be guided every day by the love and hope and impossibly big dreams that we all have for our children. So in this election we cannot sit back and hope that everything works out for the best.

We cannot afford to be tired or frustrated or cynical. No, hear me. Between now and November, we need to do what we did 8 years ago and 4 years ago. We need to knock on every door, we need to get out every vote, we need to pour every last ounce of our passion and our strength and our love for this country into electing Hillary Clinton as President of the United States of America.

So let's get to work.

Thank you all and God bless.



Photo Credit: Bloomberg via Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[Read Bernie Sanders' Speech at the DNC]]> Mon, 25 Jul 2016 20:50:46 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/Bernie+Sanders-580961394.jpg

Senator Bernie Sanders addressed the Democratic National Convention Monday evening. Here are his remarks as prepared:

Good evening.

How great it is to be with you tonight.

Let me begin by thanking the hundreds of thousands of Americans who actively participated in our campaign as volunteers. Let me thank the 2 1/2 million Americans who helped fund our campaign with an unprecedented 8 million individual campaign contributions – averaging $27 a piece. Let me thank the 13 million Americans who voted for the political revolution, giving us the 1,846 pledged delegates here tonight – 46 percent of the total. And delegates: Thank you for being here, and for all the work you’ve done. I look forward to your votes during the roll call on Tuesday night.

And let me offer a special thanks to the people of my own state of Vermont who have sustained me and supported me as a mayor, congressman, senator and presidential candidate. And to my family – my wife Jane, four kids and seven grandchildren –thank you very much for your love and hard work on this campaign.

I understand that many people here in this convention hall and around the country are disappointed about the final results of the nominating process. I think it’s fair to say that no one is more disappointed than I am. But to all of our supporters – here and around the country – I hope you take enormous pride in the historical accomplishments we have achieved.

Together, my friends, we have begun a political revolution to transform America and that revolution – our revolution – continues. Election days come and go. But the struggle of the people to create a government which represents all of us and not just the 1 percent – a government based on the principles of economic, social, racial and environmental justice – that struggle continues. And I look forward to being part of that struggle with you.

Let me be as clear as I can be. This election is not about, and has never been about, Hillary Clinton, or Donald Trump, or Bernie Sanders or any of the other candidates who sought the presidency. This election is not about political gossip. It’s not about polls. It’s not about campaign strategy. It’s not about fundraising. It’s not about all the things the media spends so much time discussing.

This election is about – and must be about – the needs of the American people and the kind of future we create for our children and grandchildren.

This election is about ending the 40-year decline of our middle class the reality that 47 million men, women and children live in poverty. It is about understanding that if we do not transform our economy, our younger generation will likely have a lower standard of living then their parents.

This election is about ending the grotesque level of income and wealth inequality that we currently experience, the worst it has been since 1928. It is not moral, not acceptable and not sustainable that the top one-tenth of one percent now own almost as much wealth as the bottom 90 percent, or that the top 1 percent in recent years has earned 85 percent of all new income. That is unacceptable. That must change.

This election is about remembering where we were 7 1/2 years ago when President Obama came into office after eight years of Republican trickle-down economics.

The Republicans want us to forget that as a result of the greed, recklessness and illegal behavior on Wall Street, our economy was in the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression. Some 800,000 people a month were losing their jobs. We were running up a record-breaking deficit of $1.4 trillion and the world’s financial system was on the verge of collapse.

We have come a long way in the last 7 1/2 years, and I thank President Obama and Vice President Biden for their leadership in pulling us out of that terrible recession.

Yes, we have made progress, but I think we can all agree that much, much more needs to be done.

This election is about which candidate understands the real problems facing this country and has offered real solutions – not just bombast, fear-mongering, name-calling and divisiveness.

We need leadership in this country which will improve the lives of working families, the children, the elderly, the sick and the poor. We need leadership which brings our people together and makes us stronger – not leadership which insults Latinos, Muslims, women, African-Americans and veterans – and divides us up.

By these measures, any objective observer will conclude that – based on her ideas and her leadership – Hillary Clinton must become the next president of the United States. The choice is not even close.

This election is about a single mom I saw in Nevada who, with tears in her eyes, told me that she was scared to death about the future because she and her young daughter were not making it on the $10.45 an hour she was earning. This election is about that woman and the millions of other workers in this country who are struggling to survive on totally inadequate wages.

Hillary Clinton understands that if someone in America works 40 hours a week, that person should not be living in poverty. She understands that we must raise the minimum wage to a living wage. And she is determined to create millions of new jobs by rebuilding our crumbling infrastructure – our roads, bridges, water systems and wastewater plants.

But her opponent – Donald Trump – well, he has a very different view. He does not support raising the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour – a starvation wage. While Donald Trump believes in huge tax breaks for billionaires, he believes that states should actually have the right to lower the minimum wage below $7.25. What an outrage!

This election is about overturning Citizens United, one of the worst Supreme Court decisions in the history of our country. That decision allows the wealthiest people in America, like the billionaire Koch brothers, to spend hundreds of millions of dollars buying elections and, in the process, undermine American democracy.

Hillary Clinton will nominate justices to the Supreme Court who are prepared to overturn Citizens United and end the movement toward oligarchy in this country. Her Supreme Court appointments will also defend a woman’s right to choose, workers’ rights, the rights of the LGBT community, the needs of minorities and immigrants and the government’s ability to protect the environment.

If you don’t believe this election is important, if you think you can sit it out, take a moment to think about the Supreme Court justices that Donald Trump would nominate and what that would mean to civil liberties, equal rights and the future of our country.

This election is about the thousands of young people I have met who have left college deeply in debt, and the many others who cannot afford to go to college. During the primary campaign, Secretary Clinton and I both focused on this issue but with different approaches. Recently, however, we have come together on a proposal that will revolutionize higher education in America. It will guarantee that the children of any family this country with an annual income of $125,000 a year or less – 83 percent of our population – will be able to go to a public college or university tuition free. That proposal also substantially reduces student debt.

This election is about climate change, the greatest environmental crisis facing our planet, and the need to leave this world in a way that is healthy and habitable for our kids and future generations. Hillary Clinton is listening to the scientists who tell us that – unless we act boldly and transform our energy system in the very near future – there will be more drought, more floods, more acidification of the oceans, more rising sea levels. She understands that when we do that we can create hundreds of thousands of good-paying jobs.

Donald Trump? Well, like most Republicans, he chooses to reject science. He believes that climate change is a “hoax,” no need to address it. Hillary Clinton understands that a president’s job is to worry about future generations, not the short-term profits of the fossil fuel industry.

This campaign is about moving the United States toward universal health care and reducing the number of people who are uninsured or under-insured. Hillary Clinton wants to see that all Americans have the right to choose a public option in their health care exchange. She believes that anyone 55 years or older should be able to opt in to Medicare and she wants to see millions more Americans gain access to primary health care, dental care, mental health counseling and low-cost prescription drugs through a major expansion of community health centers.

And What is Donald Trump’s position on health care? No surprise there. Same old, same old Republican contempt for working families. He wants to abolish the Affordable Care Act, throw 20 million people off of the health insurance they currently have and cut Medicaid for lower-income Americans.

Hillary Clinton also understands that millions of seniors, disabled vets and others are struggling with the outrageously high cost of prescription drugs and the fact that Americans pay the highest prices in the world for their medicine. She knows that Medicare must negotiate drug prices with the pharmaceutical industry and that drug companies should not be making billions in profits while one in five Americans are unable to afford the medicine they need. The greed of the drug companies must end.

This election is about the leadership we need to pass comprehensive immigration reform and repair a broken criminal justice system. It’s about making sure that young people in this country are in good schools and at good jobs, not in jail cells. Hillary Clinton understands that we have to invest in education and jobs for our young people, not more jails or incarceration.

In these stressful times for our country, this election must be about bringing our people together, not dividing us up. While Donald Trump is busy insulting one group after another, Hillary Clinton understands that our diversity is one of our greatest strengths. Yes. We become stronger when black and white, Latino, Asian-American, Native American – all of us – stand together. Yes. We become stronger when men and women, young and old, gay and straight, native born and immigrant fight to create the kind of country we all know we can become.

It is no secret that Hillary Clinton and I disagree on a number of issues. That’s what this campaign has been about. That’s what democracy is about. But I am happy to tell you that at the Democratic Platform Committee there was a significant coming together between the two campaigns and we produced, by far, the most progressive platform in the history of the Democratic Party. Among many other strong provisions, the Democratic Party now calls for breaking up the major financial institutions on Wall Street and the passage of a 21st Century Glass-Steagall Act. It also calls for strong opposition to job-killing free trade agreements like the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Our job now is to see that platform implemented by a Democratic Senate, a Democratic House and a Hillary Clinton presidency – and I am going to do everything I can to make that happen.

I have known Hillary Clinton for 25 years. I remember her as a great first lady who broke precedent in terms of the role that a first lady was supposed to play as she helped lead the fight for universal health care. I served with her in the United States Senate and know her as a fierce advocate for the rights of children.

Hillary Clinton will make an outstanding president and I am proud to stand with her here tonight.



Photo Credit: Getty Images]]>
<![CDATA[DNC Day 1 is All About Bernie]]> Mon, 25 Jul 2016 20:14:24 -0700 http://media.nbclosangeles.com/images/213*120/Sanders_Crowd_Boos_Clinton_on_DNC_Day_1_1200x675_732043331871.jpg As the DNC tries to project an image of unity, Bernie Sanders supporters fight for their candidate. Conan Nolan reports for the NBC4 News at 6 on Monday, July 25, 2016.]]>