Corona's Mayor Wants to Cut Fine for Running Red Light - NBC Southern California

Corona's Mayor Wants to Cut Fine for Running Red Light

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    Corona's Mayor Wants to Cut Fine for Running Red Light
    Mario Tama
    You won't get away with it.

    The Corona City Council will consider reining in its red-light robots to cut the cost of the $446 fine at its meeting on Wednesday.

    Mayor Steve Nolan told City Council members a bartender at his  restaurant got a ticket that dwarfed her paycheck and he was concerned that the  fines were too high.

    "It just started eating at me -- what that amount of money would do to  a family," Nolan told the Press-Enterprise.

    As it is, the tickets are issued under the state vehicle code, and  county and state fees add significantly to the fine. But Corona officials are  considering following the lead of the city of Roseville, near Sacramento, where  some tickets are issued under the city's vehicle code.

    If the tickets were issued by the city, the fines would not only be  less: Drivers caught running red lights likely would not be dinged on their  driving records, and their insurance rate would be unaffected. The city,  however, would have to absorb the administrative costs of issuing the tickets  and collecting fines.

    Nolan wants to cut the $446 fine for a first-time violation in half at  least. Many of the automated tickets are issued for drivers who don't come to  stop before taking a right on red, he said.

    City Councilman Eugene Montanez questioned the legality of Nolan's  proposal, as did San Bernardino City Attorney Jim Penman, who noted that state  law typically trumps municipal ordinances.

    Corona started issuing red-light camera tickets in May at four  intersections, issuing 6,528 to date, police spokesman Jerry Pawluczenko told  the Press-Enterprise. Revenue figures for the city were unavailable.

    Roseville started handling some of its traffic citations six months ago  to generate more money for the city by keeping all of the revenue generated by  certain violations, instead of sharing it with the county and state. But the  move did not apply it to their red-light camera violations. Officials there  said it appears the law would allow for it.