Subway to the Sea: Going Underground

Metro will answer questions about the tunnel at a meeting

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    LOS ANGELES, CA - JUNE 3: Passengers wait for Metrolink subway trains during rush hour June 3, 2008 in Los Angeles, California. Skyrocketing gas prices are driving more commuters to take trains and buses to work instead of their cars. In the first three months of 2008, the number of trips taken on public transport in the US rose 3 percent to 2.6 billion, creating pressures on some transportation systems to cope with increasing ridership. Transit officials in southern California and elsewhere are now encouraging employers to stagger employee schedules to ease the rush hour crunch on trains and buses and Metrolink plans to add 107 rail cars to its fleet of 155 as soon as next year. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

    Plans to dig a subway tunnel between Century City and Westwood include going under homes and condominiums.

    How will that impact people living above the proposed route?

    Metro plans to answer those questions at a meeting Tuesday at 6pm at Westwood United Methodist Church.  Construction experts will be on hand to explain how homes, businesses, water lines and other structures will be protected during the subway construction.

    According to Metro officials, the subway construction and daily operation of subway trains would not be noticeable inside homes or on streets.  Metro officials also said property owners will be paid if the subway tunnel is built under their land.

    Although no final decision on the route has been made, most of the construction would be under Wilshire Boulevard.

    The Metro board is expected to make a final recommendation about the project this fall.