4 Days of Rain, High Surf Expected in SoCal

Expect the wet weather to stick around through the weekend

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    NEWSLETTERS

    The first wave of showers should move out early Thursday before a second round of wet weather. Elita Loresca has the forecast for Thursday Nov. 29, 2012. (Published Thursday, Nov 29, 2012)

    A four-day spell of rain started early Thursday morning with scattered showers across much of the Southland, soaking roadways, slowing traffic and contributing to multiple SigAlerts across the region.

    At least two Thursday morning freeway crashes appeared to be weather-related: a jack-knifed big rig led to the closure of the 5 Freeway near Griffith Park, and one person was killed in a crash on the westbound 134 Freeway near Hollywood Way.

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    The light rain was expected to continue throughout Thursday, tapering off into the afternoon. Thursday's temps should range from the high 50s to mid-60s for much of Southern California.

    Mountain regions should expect chillier weather with a high of 49 and low of 26. The high desert had a high of 64 with a low of 45.

    "I think we'll see some periods of sunshine before the next wave of moisture resumes on Friday," said NBC4 meteorologist Elita Loresca.

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    Between Thursday and Sunday, a quarter-inch to an inch of rain was expected. As much as 2 inches could fall in the mountain regions.

    The strongest storm was expected to hit on Sunday, Loresca said.

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    High-surf advisories were issued for Los Angeles and Ventura counties until 10 p.m. Sunday. Expect surf of 6 to 9 feet for west-facing beaches with local sets between 12 and 15 feet.

    Orange County was also under a high-surf advisory, set to expired 1 p.m. Monday. Surf is expected to range between 6 to 8 feet Thursday night with sets up to 10 feet.

    "There is going to be the potential for some dangerous rip currents, as well as some beach erosion and some coastal flooding," Loresca said.

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