Fourth of July Warning: Toddlers Sickened by Fire Colorant - NBC Southern California
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Fourth of July Warning: Toddlers Sickened by Fire Colorant

The product, used in campfires to bring bright colors like blues and greens to flames, contains copper sulfate.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Several Toddlers Sickened From Flame Colorants

    Minnesota Poison Control said several toddlers were sickened from flame colorants - powder tossed into a summertime campfire to make blue and green flames - and is warning the public about the dangers of keeping them in places children could reach. The product, when opened, looks similar to sugar candy. The Poison Control center said they have responded to four poisoning cases since summer began. (Published Thursday, June 21, 2018)

    After a chemical packaged in a small foil packet used to create color flames in fires left several Minnesota toddlers sick, authorities were warning others ahead of the Fourth of July holiday.

    KARE reported Minnesota Poison Control was warning parents about the product, Mystical Fire, after four poisoning cases.

    Mystical Fire, made by Mystical Distributing in Canada, is sold in a packet that looks similar to Pop Rocks, a popping candy.

    The product, used in campfires to bring bright colors like blues and greens to flames, contains copper sulfate.

    Although the package does contain a warning -- it says to throw the package directly into the flames and not to open it -- several children were sickened, and one was sent to the hospital.

    The package also warns: "Caution! Irritant. Harmful if swallowed. Keep out of reach of children.”

    One way to tell if a toddler has ingested the product is look for bright blue or bright green vomit, the same color of the product in the flames, Minnesota Poison Control Medical Director, Jon Cole, said.

    Mystical Distributing President Mark Phillips said the product is "tamper-proof," and reminds users to never open the packages.

    "I’ve been selling this product 16 to 17 years, we don’t have any problems with it. There is some negligence or neglect on somebody’s part, why it got in the hands of the toddler,” Phillips said.

    KARE also reported that one case on record, a 60-year-old man in Massachusetts had mistaken Mystical Fire for Pop Rocks and died from the ingestion.

    Read more at KARE.

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