Paul Walker's Daughter Settles With Porsche in Wrongful Death Lawsuit - NBC Southern California

Paul Walker's Daughter Settles With Porsche in Wrongful Death Lawsuit

The terms of the settlement are confidential, but the documents state that now that a settlement has been reached, both parties have requested a dismissal of the suit

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    Paul Walker's Daughter Settles With Porsche in Wrongful Death Lawsuit
    AP
    Paul Walker's daughter Meadow has settled her lawsuit against Porsche in the death of her father.

    It's been almost four years since the death of Paul Walker in high-speed car crash while he was a passenger in a Porsche Carrera GT.

    Three years and 11 months after the actor's death, his 18-year-old daughter Meadow Walker has closed her wrongful death lawsuit against Porsche. According to docs obtained by E! News, the lawsuit was settled with the German car company on Oct. 16.

    The terms of the settlement are confidential, but the documents state that now that a settlement has been reached, both parties have requested a dismissal of the suit.

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    According to court documents obtained by E! News at the time, Meadow and her lawyers alleged that the Porsche Carrera GT "lacked safety features...that could have prevented the accident or, at a minimum, allowed Paul Walker to survive the crash."

    The suit alleged that Porsche knew that the specific car in Paul's case "had a history of instability and control issues." The company, however, reportedly "failed to install its electronic stability control system, which is specifically designed to protect against the swerving actions inherent in hyper-sensitive vehicles of this type."

    Law enforcement ruled the cause of the crash was a result of speeding at rates between 80 and 93 MPH. However, according to the lawsuit, Walker's driver Roger Rodas may have only been going between 63 and 71 MPH when he lost control.

    The lawsuit alleged that a "defective" seat belt prevented Paul from escaping the vehicle before it caught on fire and that he was burned alive as a result.