‘Totality Or Bust': Photos From the Path of Totality

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A view from the 2017 eclipse path of totality.
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ROSS LAKE, WASHINGTON - AUGUST 21: In this NASA handout, The Moon is seen passing in front of the Sun during a solar eclipse August 21, 2017 from Ross Lake, Northern Cascades National Park, Washington. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. (Photo by Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images)
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BANNER, WY - AUGUST 21: In this NASA handout, the International Space Station (bottom right), with a crew of six onboard, is seen in silhouette as it transits the Sun at roughly five miles per second during a partial solar eclipse, August 21, 2017 near Banner, Wyoming. Onboard as part of Expedition 52 are: NASA astronauts Peggy Whitson, Jack Fischer, and Randy Bresnik; Russian cosmonauts Fyodor Yurchikhin and Sergey Ryazanskiy; and ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Paolo Nespoli. A total solar eclipse swept across a narrow portion of the contiguous United States from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. A partial solar eclipse was visible across the entire North American continent along with parts of South America, Africa, and Europe. (Photo by Joel Kowsky/NASA via Getty Images)
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CASPER, WY - AUGUST 21: Brian Marriott of Boston, Massachusetts looks in a storage container on top of his car before watching the solar eclipse at South Mike Sedar Park on August 21, 2017 in Casper, Wyoming. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
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JACKSON, WY - AUGUST 21: The Clark family, from Shreveport, Louisiana has breakfast as they wait for the total eclipse in Grand Teton National Park on August 21, 2017 outside Jackson, Wyoming. Thousands of people have flocked to the Jackson and Teton National Park area for the 2017 solar eclipse which will be one of the areas that will experience a 100% eclipse on Monday August 21, 2017. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)
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CASPER, WY - AUGUST 21: People set up cameras and telescopes as they prepare to watch the total eclipse at South Mike Sedar Park on August 21, 2017 in Casper, Wyoming. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
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A 15-foot-tall statue of Superman wears solar eclipse glasses on August 18, 2017 in Metropolis, Illinois. Metropolis is located along the eclipse path of totality in Southern Illinois. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
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CARBONDALE , IL - AUGUST 20: Campers, in town to view the solar eclipse, relax at their indoor campsites on the campus of Southern Illinois University the evening before Monday's solar eclipse on August 20, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. Four hundred campers paid $40-per-night to camp in the gymnasium. With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
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JACKSON, WY - AUGUST 21: Morgan Squires, a park employee waits to help park and manage cars as they arrive to view the solar eclipse in Grand Teton National Park on August 21, 2017 outside Jackson, Wyoming. Thousands of people have flocked to the Jackson and Teton National Park area for the 2017 solar eclipse which will be one of the areas that will experience a 100% eclipse on Monday August 21, 2017. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)
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COLUMBIA, SC - AUGUST 20: An employee arranges eclipse merchandise at Mast General Store August 20, 2017 in Columbia, South Carolina. Columbia is one of the prime destinations for viewing Monday's solar eclipse and NASA expects clear weather to bring over a million visitors to the state. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
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COLUMBIA, SC - AUGUST 20: Crowds wait in line for "eclipse" donuts August 20, 2017 in Columbia, South Carolina. Columbia is one of the prime destinations for viewing Monday's solar eclipse, and NASA expects clear weather to bring over a million visitors to the state. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
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The decorated car of Frank and Mary Ludwig, of La Crescent, Minn., sits at their campsite at the Orchard Dale historical farm near Hopkinsville, Ky. Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. The location, which is in the path of totality of the solar eclipse, is also at the point of greatest intensity. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
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Jim Cleveland, of Shelbyville, Ky., sets up a camera at his campsite at sunrise as he prepares for the solar eclipse Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, on the Orchard Dale historical farm near Hopkinsville, Ky. The location, which is in the path of totality, is also at the point of greatest intensity. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
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A large screen with a live telescope feed of the sun is visible behind Karen Tingey as she drums with Portland Taiko during a rehearsal in preparation for Monday's solar eclipse, in Salem, Ore., Sunday, Aug. 20, 2017. Salem is in the path of totality during the eclipse. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
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The cross on top of the First Baptist Church is silhouetted in front of the sun on Sunday, Aug. 20, 2017, in Simpsonville, S.C. South Carolina is gearing up for a total solar eclipse, which will cross the state diagonally during a phenomenon that will be seen across the country. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
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Ray Cooper, volunteer for the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, preps his equipment to provide live video of the Aug. 21, 2017, solar eclipse at the state fairgrounds in Salem, Ore., Sunday, Aug. 20, 2017.(AP Photo/Don Ryan)
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Ray Cooper, volunteer for the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, preps his equipment to provide live video of the Aug. 21, 2017, solar eclipse at the state fairgrounds in Salem, Ore., Sunday, Aug. 20, 2017.(AP Photo/Don Ryan)
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In this photo taken Friday, Aug. 18, 2017, Poureal Long, a fourth grader at Clardy Elementary School in Kansas City, Mo., practices the proper use of eclipse glasses in anticipation of Monday's solar eclipse. Schools around the country preparing for the solar eclipse are reacting in a variety ways, with some using the event for a full day of science lessons and others closing to avoid the crush of crowds expected in their towns. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
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In this photo taken Friday, Aug. 18, 2017, fourth graders at Clardy Elementary School in Kansas City, Mo. practice the proper use of their eclipse glasses in anticipation of Monday's solar eclipse. Schools around the country preparing for the solar eclipse are reacting in a variety ways, with some using the event for a full day of science lessons and others closing to avoid the crush of crowds expected in their towns. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
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A sign advertises parking spots for the Solar eclipse on August 19, 2017 in Makanda, Illinois. With approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality, the town of about 600 people in Southern Illinois will experience the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
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People stop at a roadside information center to get information on the solar eclipse in Grand Teton National Park on August 20, 2017 outside Jackson, Wyoming. People are flocking to the Jackson and Teton National Park area for the 2017 solar eclipse which will be one of the areas that will experience a 100 percent eclipse on Monday August 21, 2017. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)
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Food concessions on the campus of Southern Illinois University are nearly deserted two days before Monday's solar eclipse on August 19, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois.
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Sinking Fork Christian Church has sold spaces in its parking lot to view the upcoming solar eclipse on August 17, 2017 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. Hopkinsville, in Western Kentucky, is located near the point of greatest totality for the August 21 eclipse. The eclipse will cut a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
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Griffin Moore makes solar eclipse related shirts at her Griffin's Studio on August 16, 2017 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky.
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Solar eclipse related items created by local artisans are offered for sale at the Hopkinsville Art Guild on August 16, 2017 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky.
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Sinking Fork Baptist Church displays a message related to the upcoming solar eclipse to motorist who pass by on the highway on August 17, 2017 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky.
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A sign in the window of a business tells visitors they will be closed on August 31 for the solar eclipse on August 17, 2017 in Metropolis, Illinois.
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A sign placed by the Army Corps of Engineers urges people to view the solar eclipse from the Barkley Dam Powerplant on August 17, 2017 in Kuttawa, Kentucky.
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A sign in the window of the Metropolis Chamber of Commerce tells visitors of a short supply of solar eclipse viewing glasses on August 17, 2017 in Metropolis, Illinois.
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Solar Eclipse related items are offered for sale at Griffin's Studio on August 16, 2017 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky.
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Solar eclipse related items created by local artisans are offered for sale at the Hopkinsville Art Guild on August 16, 2017 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky.
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An eclipse countdown clock sit among a display of Total Eclipse Moonshine, which was distilled to commemorate the upcoming solar eclipse, at Casey Jones Distillery on August 16, 2017 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. The distillery, which is located two miles from the point of greatest totality for the August 21 eclipse, expects to host as many as 3,500 people who plan to view the eclipse from their grounds just outside of Hopkinsville.
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An eclipse glasses sold out sign is posted outside the Clark Planetarium main doors advising people to safely view the eclipse with a pinhole projector after the planetarium ran out of glasses Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017, in Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Brady McCombs)
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A line forms outside Mangelsen's, an arts and crafts store in Omaha, Neb., Friday, Aug. 18, 2017, where a new shipment of solar glasses is about to be offered for sale. Solar glasses are in tight supply ahead of the solar eclipse that will sweep across Nebraska on Monday. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
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Susan Borres of Omaha takes a photo of her newly purchased solar glasses as others wait outside Mangelsen's, an arts and crafts store, to buy theirs, in Omaha, Neb., Friday, Aug. 18, 2017. Solar glasses are in tight supply ahead of the solar eclipse that will sweep across Nebraska on Monday. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
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People lined up outside Mangelsen's, an arts and crafts store in Omaha, Neb., Friday, Aug. 18, 2017, where a new shipment of solar glasses is about to be offered for sale, do the wave to help pass the time. Solar glasses are in tight supply ahead of the solar eclipse that will sweep across Nebraska on Monday. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
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