Vaccination site

Coronavirus Vaccinations End April 11 at Giant Cal State Los Angeles Site

Operations by the state and FEMA will end April 11, but talks are underway for possible continued use of the location.

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The large-scale vaccination site at Cal State Los Angeles will stop operations on April 11 after it administered more than 200,000 doses of COVID-19 vaccine, federal and state officials managing the location announced Friday.

But discussions are under way with local officials for possible continued use of the location when the Federal Emergency Management Agency and Governor's Office of Emergency Services conclude their work.

The location was opened in February as an eight-week pilot project, marking a cooperative effort between the state and federal government targeting lower-income areas hard hit by the pandemic. The partnership included two vaccination sites -- one at Cal State Los Angeles and the other in Oakland.

The two sites combined have administered about 445,000 doses of vaccine since they opened. The Los Angeles site had doled out roughly 215,000 doses as of Tuesday.

FEMA and state officials said roughly two-thirds of the shots administered at the sites have been to under-served communities and people of color.

With the operations winding down, the site this week is completing the administration of second doses of the Pfizer vaccines to people who had already received their initial dose. Beginning April 1, the site will be administering only the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

Appointment slots for those doses will be released daily beginning April 1 through the state's MyTurn web portal, or by calling 833-422-4255.

California COVID-19 Vaccinations

The map tracks the number of doses administered by a recipient's county of residence according to the The California Department of Public Health.

Source: The statewide totals for doses administered reflect Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data. Otherwise we used data from the California Department of Public Health.
Amy O’Kruk/NBC

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