Compton Dirty Water: Residents File Lawsuit Against Water Company - NBC Southern California

Compton Dirty Water: Residents File Lawsuit Against Water Company

6,000 residents have filed a lawsuit against the company that offers the potable water service.

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    Compton Dirty Water: Residents File Lawsuit Against Water Company
    KVEA
    Thousands of residents in the Compton area affected by dirty, reddish water filed a lawsuit Monday against the company that provides potable water to their homes.

    Thousands of residents in the Compton area affected by dirty, reddish water filed a lawsuit Monday against the company that provides potable water to their homes.

    The lawsuit against "Sativa Los Angeles County Water District" seeks to recover money for the more than 6,000 residents affected by what they claim is "water that cannot be consumed."

    "You think we are going to drink this water, much less the children," said Jose Zavala, a Compton resident.

    People affected by the water said that months, years have passed and the situation has not improved and they are frustrated.

    "Anybody would be, in the morning when I open the bathroom faucets it's like they've put blood in the toilet," said Zavala. 

    The attorney representing the residents, Mark Ravis, explained that the lawsuit seeks to recover the monthly payments of $65 from each home that were made during the past year. Those affected say they cannot drink, cook or bathe with the water that reaches their home, forcing them to purchase bottled water.

    NBC4's sister station Telemundo 52 communicated with the company by phone, but representatives of the company said they had no comment at the moment and that they would send a message for someone to contact them.

    Dissatisfied residents said that complaining for years and not seeing any improvement and lack of action were the causes of the demand.

    Affected people will have the opportunity to express their dissatisfaction with a state organization called "The Local Action Formation Commission," which has the authority to dissolve or eliminate special districts like Sativa. Residents said they will be present to show evidence of the harsh conditions they have been enduring for months.

    The Sativa water district will have 30 days to respond to the demand.

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