Firefighters Work to Put Out Mandeville Brush Fire - NBC Southern California
California Wildfires

California Wildfires

Coverage of brush fires across the state

Firefighters Work to Put Out Mandeville Brush Fire

The fire was caused by a worker cutting brush with a weed whacker to help prevent a fire

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    Firefighters, lower right, work to contain a wildfire that broke out in the Brentwood area of Los Angeles, Sunday, May 28, 2017. A dark plume of smoke was visible for miles as the fire consumed moderate to thick brush near Mandeville Canyon Road, a dead end road that snakes up a deep canyon lined by expensive view homes. A few residents voluntarily left but no homes were damaged. (AP Photo/Brian Melley)

    Firefighters were expected to work into Tuesday to put out a brush fire in Brentwood's Mandeville Canyon that has charred about 55 acres.

    The flames were 95 percent contained by a line of cleared vegetation this morning and new crews of firefighters replaced the firefighters who worked all night, according to Los Angeles Fire Department spokesman Brian Humphrey.

    "LAFD operations will continue throughout the night and well into tomorrow with ground crews on patrol and LAFD helicopters available," Humphrey said.

    The fire was accidentally caused by a worker doing weed abatement for brush clearance, said the LAFD's Margaret Stewart. By the time it was reported at 12:45 p.m. Sunday it had burned three to four acres of brush near a house in the 2960 block of Mandeville Canyon Road, she said.

    Weed Whacker Accidentally Sparks Mandeville Fire

    [LA] Weed Whacker Accidentally Sparks Mandeville Fire

    The Mandeville fire was caused by a worker doing weed abatement for brush clearance. Rick Montanez reports for the NBC4 News at 11 on Sunday, May 28, 2017.

    (Published Sunday, May 28, 2017)

    An hour later, it had spread to eight acres, burning up hillsides toward the Mountaingate Country Club, Stewart said.

    At 10:40 p.m. the acreage had risen to about 55 acres but a containment line of cleared brush was about 70 percent around the flames and resources sent by mutual aid agencies had been released, Stewart said.

    A volcano-like smoke plume was visible Sunday across the Westside and San Fernando Valley, as the fire consumed moderate to thick brush in an area just off Mandeville Canyon Road, a dead end thoroughfare that snakes up a deep canyon, lined by expensive view houses.

    Firefighters asked Los Angeles police to be ready in case houses needed to be evacuated. Eventually five homes were cleared, Stewart said. By late Sunday evening residents with IDs were allowed to return to their homes.

    No houses were burned and no injuries were reported.

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