New Technology Could Prevent Concussions in Sports - NBC Southern California

New Technology Could Prevent Concussions in Sports

The headband-like tool is being worn by the Netherlands' soccer team in the Special Olympics. Athletes are monitored through a wireless transmitter.

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    New Technology Could Prevent Concussions in Sports

    A new technology could help prevent concussions for athletes. Lolita Lopez reports for the NBC4 News at 5 and 6 p.m. on July 30, 2015. (Published Thursday, July 30, 2015)

    A new device designed to prevent head injuries is being used by athletes in the Special Olympics World Games.

    Cooper Hollingsworth created Triax Technology with his father and brothers, targeting sports where head play is common and athletes are at risk of concussions.

    The headband-like tool is being worn by the Netherlands' soccer team in the Special Olympics, with athletes monitored through a wireless transmitter.

    A coach or trainer can receive impact results on their smartphone, tablet or computer, within milliseconds of any physical contact to the athlete's head, said Hollingsworth.

    "It's not a diagnostic tool, it's a way to drive attention to an athlete that is at risk," Hollingsworth said.

    The new device is gaining ground among some professional soccer players who advocate against teaching the soccer technique of "heading" until high school.

    A study by the Sport Legacy Institute showed 11 percent of children who suffer a concussion in a soccer game have symptoms three months later.

    Medical experts at the World Games hope the device can be valuable for training and research.

    "When you are teaching an athlete how to head a ball, we may be able to use information related to the intensity of impact to tell if they are using proper mechanics," said Vernon Williams, medical director for concussions at the Special Olympics.

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