Agoura Hills

After Home of 27 Years Was Damaged in Woolsey Fire, Family Moves Back in

“It's not so easy to find contractors and plumbers and electricians, and everything you need to put a house back together,” the mayor said. But the Broshes made it happen, and already they're preparing for Hanukkah.

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An Agoura Hills family whose home was ravaged by the Woolsey Fire is ending the year with some good news: they will be able to celebrate the holidays back in their own home.

Diane Brosh remembers the moment New Year’s morning 2019 when she spotted a lone coyote in the parking lot of the hotel where she and her husband, Rami, were staying.

“I looked at my husband and I burst into tears,” she said. “He had no idea what was going on with me.”

"We've been displaced," she told him. "Just like that coyote."

It was the first time in years that the Broshes could not host their annual New Year’s party. The Woolsey Fire had gutted their home of 27 years. They were living out of suitcases and wondering when and even if their nightmare might end.

“Things were just charred and melted, and it took maybe eight months, nine months to get the smell out,” Brosh said.

However, slightly more than a year later, the Broshes' home is not only restored after sustaining massive interior damage and a collapsed ceiling, it is new and improved.

Agoura Hills Mayor Illece Buckley Weber said the city is doing all it can to help others accomplish what the Broshes did. It's providing case managers and staff to help them navigate the paperwork and the permits.

“It's not so easy to find contractors and plumbers and electricians, and everything you need to put a house back together,” the mayor said.

But the Broshes made it happen, and already they're preparing for Hanukkah. A few days after that, they’ll gear up for their annual New Year’s party, which Brosh said will be the “biggest one yet.”

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