Overcrowding, Classroom Size Outrage in LAUSD Schools May Force Parents to File Complaint Against District - NBC Southern California

Overcrowding, Classroom Size Outrage in LAUSD Schools May Force Parents to File Complaint Against District

Another issue has been when air conditioning breaks down, and too many students are in each classroom.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Students and Teachers Speak Out Against Large Class Sizes in LA

    Parents, teachers and students at Hamilton High said Monday that they may be forced to file a complaint against LAUSD after class size hinders learning. Angie Crouch reports for the NBC4 News at 5. (Published Monday, Oct. 19, 2015)

    Parents, teachers and students fed up with class sizes in the Los Angeles Unified School District said Monday that despite improvements, there are just too many students in each class.

    Class sizes at Hamilton High School in Palms have been so large that parents said they may file a grievance against the district if there’s no change.

    "If we don’t get the quality education we are being set up to fail," said Karen Calderon, Hamilton High student.

    There are about 3,000 students attending Hamilton High School.
    Teachers said in the latest contract, LAUSD agreed to lower class size, and did to some extent.

    Last year, 110 classes had more than 40 students.
    In 2015, there are 66 overcrowded classrooms, but parents said more must be done.

    "It is an outrageous disregard for LAUSD teachers that more teachers haven’t been hired to get the class size to 35 to one [teacher] for high school, 30 to one for middle school and 25 to one for elementary," Katherine Williamson, parent, said.

    Student Lilah Lebowski said she’s seen behavioral problems as a result of overcrowded classrooms, mostly because the teacher can’t focus his or her attention on so many students.

    "Teachers can’t have a personal relationship with you," Lebowski said. "They barely know your name. They have so many students. It’s frustrating to ask questions and not get them fully answered because they need to continue on."

    Another issue has been when air conditioning breaks down, and too many students per classroom becomes a health hazard, according to an English teacher at Hamilton High.

    "The humidity rises to 90 degrees and I've been diagnosed with heat exhaustion on three separate occasions as a result," Nick Johnson, English teacher, said.