Hoarding Forces LA City Animal Shelters to Max Capacity - NBC Southern California
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Hoarding Forces LA City Animal Shelters to Max Capacity

Due to limited space and resources, more than 250 animals are currently on the red list -- which means, if not adopted, the animal will be euthanized.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    LA Animal Shelters Filled to the Brim

    Los Angeles Animal Services is dealing with massive overpopulation at its shelters, and unless the problem is fixed, some of the furry friends might be euthanized. Angie Crouch reports for the NBC4 News at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, July 31, 2018. (Published Tuesday, July 31, 2018)

    LA City Animal Shelters are in crisis situations due to three separate hoarding cases, which brought in nearly 300 animals through its doors.

    "We see this very often," said LA Animal Services Spokesperson, Ashley Rodriguez. "But usually cases are more spread out -- not within the same week."

    Rescuers seized 25 animals from one location, and were investigating if the situation called for criminal charges.  

    Nearly 100 cats and dogs were seized from three locations last week, as well as remaining bunnies from a seizure in March. The new furry additions leave all six of LA City Shelters at max capacity.

    "As they were heading back to the shelter, some rabbits were giving birth in the truck," Rodriguez recalled on the March seizure of nearly 200 rabbits. "All six shelters helped out and took some in."

    Due to limited space and resources, more than 250 animals are currently on the red list -- which means, if not adopted, the animal will be euthanized.

    "Just because they are on the list doesn't mean that they will be euthanized," Rodriguez said. "We do our best to find a home, however, it is ultimately up to the adopters to get these animals out of the shelter."

    Adoption is always the perfect narrative, but shelter staff are also asking the public to consider fostering.

    "Being in a foster home allows them to de-stress," said Royce Chang of Angel City Pit Bulls. "Cortisol levels go down and you get to see who they really are."

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