Christmas

Local Nonprofits Affected by Supply Chain Crisis

Brenda Wilson and Lynda Moran started their charity “New Image” together nearly 30 years ago. 

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The supply chain crisis at the ports is impacting everything from Thanksgiving dinner to Christmas shopping. Now, even nonprofits and charities are feeling the impact.

A nonprofit started by two sisters was expecting nearly 30,000 donated toys, which are now stuck at the ports. 

Brenda Wilson and Lynda Moran are identical twins who do everything together.

The Long Beach sisters even started their charity “New Image” together nearly 30 years ago. 

This year, they are facing their biggest challenge yet. 

“We are trying to reach out to see who can help us because we got to make this year work,” said Brenda Wilson, executive director for New Image. “We really did not think anything was going to be more challenging than last year”

The sisters organize a children’s Christmas store every year where thousands of children get to pick out toys, books, shoes and clothes all donated by generous donors.

Last year, they put on a pandemic drive-thru event. They had the toys. 

But this year, most of their toys from donors are stuck at the ports and not expected to get here until after Christmas.

“I think if we are lucky  we may have 8,000 toys and we definitely need to have at least 30,” said Lynda Moran, deputy director for New Image. 

The nation’s ongoing supply chain crisis has non profits like New Image scrambling.

The sisters won’t let the supply chain crisis steal Christmas for thousands of kids. 

They’re hoping others who have toys on land can help them replace the ones stuck at sea.

“It’s going to go on even if they only get one,” Moran said. 

The sisters are planning to have their event on Dec. 18th at the Long Beach Hilton.

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