Los Angeles

Rain is Pushing Through SoCal. Here's the Timing of the Storm

Get ready Wednesday night -- the storm will make the morning commute slick.

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Take it slow on the road because it’s going to be a slippery commute. Belen De Leon explains all you need to know about this storm Dec. 9, 2021.

A storm was bearing down on Southern California Thursday morning, bringing steady rain, slick roads, and snow in the mountains.

The rain began overnight in Southern California, making for a wet -- and dangerous -- commute.

Probable Timing and Location of the Rain

Drivers can expect a very wet commute starting at 4 a.m. The rain will first push through Ventura County.

While the morning commute will begin with showers, steady rain will fall across the area between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Ventura County, San Fernando or Santa Clarita Valleys, Lancaster and Palmdale should see steady rainfall to start at 11 a.m.  Light snow will begin to move in over the Grapevine and could pose a problem for travelers heading in and out of Central California to the Southern region.

From 12 p.m. to 4 p.m., the storm can be expected to head east toward Orange County and Inland Empire.

From 4 to 7:30 p.m., the storm will head to eastern Inland Empire and move south to San Diego County.

Snow should begin falling over Big Bear as well.

Mountain areas over 6,000 feet could expect a couple inches of snow.

As the rain moves out, the wind will blow in right behind it.

A Wind Advisory will be in effect for LA County mountains and Antelope Valley beginning at 10 p.m. Wednesday night until 3 a.m. Friday. As the rain moves out, the winds will turn out of the northwest. This will usher in colder air late Thursday night into Friday. 

Be sure to secure those holiday decorations on the house.

Rainfall Amounts

For most areas, residents can expect .10 inches to .25 inches.

Mountain areas could see .25” to .50” but most totals will be closer to .25” with some higher amounts

Deserts will get a small portion, with just about .10” of rainfall. By the time the rain makes it into the deserts, there will be very little moisture left.

Looking Ahead

Though this storm isn't expected to cause mud or debris flows, another system moving into SoCal early next week may pose a mud flow threat.

The weekend is expected to be dry, but come Monday, the rain will begin again.