Perseid Meteor Showers of Years Past

Perseid meteors light up the sky every year between mid-July and late August when Earth passes through cosmic debris left by comet Swift-Tuttle.

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Perseid meteors streak across the sky over Inegol district of Bursa, Turkey on August 12, 2015. The display, known as the Perseid shower because the meteors appear to radiate from the constellation Perseus in the northeastern sky, is a result of Earth's orbit passing through debris from the comet Swift-Tuttle.
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A Perseid meteor (R) streaks across the sky past the light trail of an aircraft over the Lovell Radio Telescope at Jodrell Bank on August 13, 2013 in Holmes Chapel, United Kingdom.The annual display, known as the Perseid shower because the meteors appear to radiate from the constellation Perseus in the northeastern sky, is a result of Earth's orbit passing through debris from the comet Swift-Tuttle.
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Perseid meteors streak across the sky on August 12, 2013 in Cathedral Gorge State Park, Nevada.
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A long exposure image showing a Perseids meteor (L) streaking across the night sky over St. Ioan medieval church near the village of Potsurnentsi, late on August 12, 2013.
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A Perseid meteor (upper left) streaks across the sky over a building at the Techatticup Mine early August 13, 2010 in Eldorado Canyon, Nevada.
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Perseid meteors streak across the sky early August 12, 2008 near Rogers Spring in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Nevada.
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SPRING MOUNTAINS NATIONAL RECREATION AREA, NV - AUGUST 13: A Perseid meteor streaks across the sky above desert pine trees on August 13, 2015 in the Spring Mountains National Recreation Area, Nevada. The annual display, known as the Perseid shower because the meteors appear to radiate from the constellation Perseus in the northeastern sky, is a result of Earth's orbit passing through debris from the comet Swift-Tuttle. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
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