Apple, Google Cashed in on QDrops App Peddling 'Pizzagate' Conspiracy Offshoot - NBC Southern California
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Apple, Google Cashed in on QDrops App Peddling 'Pizzagate' Conspiracy Offshoot

Apple removed the QDrops app from its app store Sunday after it was contacted by NBC News

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    A photo of the QDropps app's Twitter account displayed on a computer screen on Monday, July 16, 2018.

    An app that sent alerts about a child sex ring conspiracy theory called QAnon stayed in Apple's App Store and Google's Play Store for months, raising revenue for the conspirators and the tech giants, NBC News reported.

    The fringe QAnon conspiracy purports that a secret police task force put assembled by President Donald Trump has arrested world politicians in a murderous child sex ring and forced them to wear ankle bracelets. It's an offshoot of the "pizzagate" fiction and has led to real-world actions, like a follower who blocked an entrance to the Hoover Dam last month.

    The 99-cent QDrops app was launched in April and sends alerts when new details about the supposed investigation are posted on the anonymous social media site 4Chan.

    QDrops peaked at No. 10 among all paid Apple apps, though Apple removed it from its app store Sunday after it was contacted by NBC News. The app remains live on the Google Play Store; Google has yet to respond to a request for comment.

    Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    [NATL] Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of “The Case for Reparations,” testified before a House Judiciary subcommittee during a hearing on whether the United States should consider compensation for the descendants of slaves. 

    He delivered a rebuttal to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's comments that "no one currently alive was responsible for that," which Coates called a "strange theory of governance." 

    "Well into this century the United States was still paying out pensions to the heirs of civil war soldiers," he said. "We honor treaties that date back some 200 years despite no one being alive who signed those treaties. Many of us would love to be taxed for the things we are solely and individually responsible for. But we are American citizens and this bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond our individual and personal reach."

    (Published Wednesday, June 19, 2019)