Next Mission for Women With Military Service: Run for Office - NBC Southern California
Decision 2018

Decision 2018

The latest news on local, state and national midterm elections

Next Mission for Women With Military Service: Run for Office

Female veterans are part of a record number of women running for seats in Congress

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    From left: Amy McGrath, Gina Ortiz and MJ Hegar are all U.S. military veterans, and they're part of the record number of women running for Congress in this year's midterm elections.

    A dragon winds around a cherry tree in the tattoo across MJ Hegar's arm and back, over the shrapnel wounds she hadn't wanted to see with her young children around.

    But nine years after being shot down in Afghanistan, then winning a lawsuit against the federal government, writing a book and now running for a Texas congressional seat, Hegar isn't hiding much anymore.

    "I carry my service with me wherever I go," Hegar said. "We don't see my family and my childhood and my service as different chapters. It's all a package deal."

    Hegar is part of a crop of female veterans running for Congress in this year's midterm elections. Almost all Democrats and many of them mothers, they are shaped by the Sept. 11 attacks and overseas wars, including the longest war in American history. Many are retiring from the military and looking for another way to serve the country.

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    They're part of a record number of women running for seats in Congress, but in certain ways, they are a class apart.

    The female veterans claim expertise in national security and veterans issues, with a track record of thriving in institutions dominated by men. Regardless of party, they cast themselves as the antidote to bitterly partisan politics: "mission-driven" and trained by the military to work toward a common goal.

    "I flew 89 combat missions as a U.S. Marine. My 90th mission is running for Congress to take on politicians who put party over country," said Kentucky Democratic candidate Amy McGrath, the first female Marine to fly an F/A-18 in combat.

    Two Democrats — Massachusetts Rep. Seth Moulton, a retired Marine Corps captain and Bronze Star recipient, and Illinois Sen. Tammy Duckworth, who lost her legs and partial use of an arm when her helicopter was shot down by a rocket-propelled grenade in Iraq — have been instrumental in recruiting veterans to run for office.

    "It's the year of the woman, but it's also the year of yearning for bringing integrity and honor back to politics," Moulton said. "We need Democrats with the credibility to tell people what's really going on."

    The women are hardly the first to use their military service to their political advantage — men have been doing it for decades. But their campaigns highlight a set of political concerns specific to female veterans.

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    The candidates acknowledge that their extraordinary stories of trailblazing military careers could make it difficult for some voters to relate to them. Will they come off as too tough or hawkish? Is it possible for any candidate, male or female, to overemphasize his or her military background in the post-9/11 era?

    McGrath released a 30-second spot that mentioned the 89 combat missions — but focused on her taking her three children to the pediatrician.

    "I'm Amy McGrath and I approved this ad," she says, as her young son takes off down a hallway with his pants down. "Because I'd like to see the other guys running deal with this."

    Much of Hegar's story was already public by the time she decided to challenge Republican Rep. John Carter in the Austin-area district, so she went for the full reveal — tattoos and all.

    Her video, "Doors," features the door of the helicopter in which she was shot down on her third tour of Afghanistan as a combat search-and-rescue pilot. Her medals, including a Purple Heart, play a role, as does Hegar's 2012 lawsuit against the federal government that forced it to repeal the ban on women in combat.

    Air Force veteran Gina Ortiz Jones, a Democratic nominee for Congress, hopes her active military duty and intelligence work will "neutralize this perceived strength" of Republicans as strong on security issues.

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    That could be important in the race for the San Antonio-area seat held by Republican Rep. Will Hurd, a former CIA operative. Ortiz Jones supports Medicare for all and single-payer health insurance, positions that could be considered too liberal for the district.

    "'Liberal' isn't a word that is normally used to describe my work in national security," she said.

    If these women win, they will join an exclusive club in Congress.

    Just 19 percent of lawmakers are veterans — the same percentage that are women. Only four members are both: Sens. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, and Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill.; and Reps. Martha McSally, R-Ariz., and Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii.

    "It kind of reminds me of a fighter squadron, with so few women," said McSally, a retired Air Force veteran who was the first woman to fly in combat and is now running for U.S. Senate.

    New Jersey's Mikie Sherrill, a Democrat running for Congress, is a former helicopter pilot and prosecutor whose time at the Naval Academy dovetailed with the Tailhook sexual assault scandal in the Navy and Marine Corps. In the 1990s, she said, speaking out when she felt sexually harassed "would really have impacted the way I was treated in the squadron."

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    But these days, with a generation of women retiring from the military and a record number running for Congress, "it's become a lot easier to talk about these things," she said.