Womens March

Thousands of Women March, Participate in Other Pre-Election Actions Saturday

The marches will focus on women's reproductive issues, getting out the vote and protesting the Trump Administration's efforts to replace the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

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Thousands of women nationwide participated in a series of pre-election demonstrations today, which included a noon march in downtown Los Angeles, focusing on women's reproductive issues, getting out the vote and protesting the Trump Administration's efforts to replace the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

It appeared there were hundreds of women and some men, wearing face masks and attempting to socially distance, marching from Pershing Square to Los Angeles City Hall, including several women dressed as handmaids as depicted in a fictional television series about a totalitarian society ruled by a fundamentalist regime that treats women as property of the state.

The women wore signs reading, "Trump/Pence Out Now" and "Rebel Handmaid Squad."

Others marching were shown on video carrying signs reading, "The flies can't do it alone," "History is Watching" and "Boys will be feminists."

Marchers chanted "Women's rights are human rights," and "No justice, no peace."

A number of virtual events, voter registration drives, phone banking efforts and text messaging campaigns were also planned.

In addition to the Los Angeles march, similar gatherings were scheduled in other parts of the Southland including Pasadena, Long Beach, Torrance and Laguna Niguel.

"There are over 400 being planned around the country and Pasadena is one of them," organizer Jenna Karvunidis, who is co-hosting a march outside Pasadena City Hall, told the Pasadena Now website. "This march particularly has to do with not confirming the new Supreme Court justice until after the election."

"It was Ginsburg's dying wish to not be replaced until after the election, and I think that we should honor that."

Women's Marches have been held regularly since Jan. 21, 2017, the day after President Donald Trump was sworn into office, in one of the largest public demonstrations in U.S. history.

Today's gatherings were the second under the Women's March banner this year. Earlier marches were held Jan. 18 to commemorate the 2017 event, and renew support for women's rights.

"Women are going to decide this election," Rachel O'Leary Carmona, executive director of the Women's March, told the Washington Post. "We are fired up. We are ready to take action. This is a preview of what you're going to see on November third."

Several more demonstrations were scheduled in L.A. and Orange counties. More information and a complete list of events is available at https://womensmarch.com.

Copyright CNS - City News Service
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