Ahead of Saudi Trip, Obama Wedged in Debate Over Controversial Bill

The legislation would allow Americans to sue foreign countries if they are found to be responsible for terror attacks on U.S. soil

President Barack Obama travels to Saudi Arabia this week amid mounting tension over a bill backed by many families of 9/11 victims, who believe that the Gulf country played a role in the attacks.
The legislation would allow Americans to sue foreign countries if they are found to be responsible for terror attacks on U.S. soil.
Saudi Arabia, which has always denied involvement in the attacks, has responded by pledging to sell off $750 billion in American assets if efforts to hold the country responsible for 9/11 are successful.
White House spokesman Josh Earnest told reporters that he can't say whether the matter will come up between Obama and the Saudis in the upcoming trip, but that the recent attention on the bill "might change that equation."

President Barack Obama travels to Saudi Arabia this week amid mounting tension over a bill backed by many families of 9/11 victims, who believe that the Gulf country played a role in the attacks.

The legislation would allow Americans to sue foreign countries if they are found to be responsible for terror attacks on U.S. soil.

Saudi Arabia, which has always denied involvement in the attacks, has responded by pledging to sell off $750 billion in American assets if efforts to hold the country responsible for 9/11 are successful.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest told reporters that he can't say whether the matter will come up between Obama and the Saudis in the upcoming trip, but that the recent attention on the bill "might change that equation."

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