City News Service

Pierce College Football Coach Accused of Letting Players Sleep in Locker Room in Exchange for Rent

The coach is also accused of allowing ineligible players to compete in games.

Pierce College's head football coach is under formal internal investigation for allegations he let players sleep in the locker room in exchange for rent, according to reports.

Carlos Woods allegedly collected $300-400 from players, some of whom he is accused of recruiting from out of state, after they were evicted from their overcrowded apartment, as initially reported by The Roundup, the college's newspaper.

Dean of Student Services and Equity Genice Sarcedo-Magruder, who is also the acting athletic director, told the paper an investigation was launched after multiple complaints were filed by students and staff.

Woods reportedly declined to comment on the complaints.

At least four players lived in the locker this semester after they were evicted, according to The Roundup. They had been among a group of at least 30 players who were living in a three-bedroom apartment at De Soto Avenue and Vanowen Street. One player likened the conditions to a camp or a jail.

The coach is also accused of recruiting out-of-state players and allowing other ineligible players to compete in games.

Jose Cordova, a former player who no longer attends the college, told the paper that players in the apartment slept in bunk beds and on cots in any available space.

"Coach Woods told me that I was valid to move to LA from Orlando, Florida, and that my housing would be set up with other players coming in and returning athletes," Cordova said. "Woods told me that it would be four to five players in a three-bedroom, and we would all split the bills and each pay $350 for rent 'everything included.'"

He said that once he arrived, however, it felt like the coach had packed nearly the whole team into the apartment and when they received eviction notices on their door, the coach said they would have until the end of the 2018 fall semester to live there, and then would be on their own. Many of the players were from out of state, he said, adding that he ended up homeless, living out of his car.

Copyright C
Contact Us