Cowboys' Elliott Drops Appeal, Will Serve Rest of 6-Game Ban - NBC Southern California

Cowboys' Elliott Drops Appeal, Will Serve Rest of 6-Game Ban

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Ezekiel Elliott will serve his six-game suspension after dropping his appeal. NBC 5's sports director, Newy Scruggs, explains what this means for Zeke and the Cowboys going forward. (Published Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017)

    Dallas Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott is ending his legal fight with five games remaining on a six-game suspension over alleged domestic violence.

    Elliott's agent and lawyer said in the statement Wednesday that the decision comes from a "practical assessment of the legal landscape" and Elliott's desire for closures in this matter.

    The statement also says it's not an admission of any wrongdoing.

    Elliott, who missed last Sunday's game against the Atlanta Falcons, will miss upcoming games against the Eagles, Chargers, Redskins, Giants and Raiders before rejoining team activities and practices on Dec. 18.

    He'll be available for the final two games of the season, beginning on Christmas Eve against the Seattle Seahawks and then a rematch with the Eagles on New Year's Eve.

    The 22-year-old Elliott was suspended in August after the league concluded following a yearlong investigation that he had several physical confrontations in the summer of 2016 with Tiffany Thompson, his girlfriend at the time.

    Prosecutors in Ohio didn't pursue the case, citing conflicting evidence. Elliott denied the allegations under oath during his NFL appeal.

    The entire statement is below:

    "In consultation with the NFLPA and his lawyers, and after careful deliberation and review of the recent Second Circuit decisions, Mr. Elliott has decided to forego any further appeals and will serve the remaining suspension. This decision arises from a practical assessment of the current legal landscape. Mr. Elliott's desire for closure in this matter is in his best interest, as well as the best interests of his teammates, family and friends. This decision is in no way an admission of any wrongdoing, and Mr. Elliott is pleased that the legal fight mounted by he and his team resulted in disclosing many hidden truths regarding this matter as well publicly exposing the NFL's mismanagement of its disciplinary process. Mr. Elliott will maximize this time away from the game and come back even stronger both on and off the field. He intends to release a final personal statement in the upcoming weeks and until then we have no further comment."

    "Our vigilant fight on behalf of Ezekiel once again exposed the NFL's disciplinary process as a sham and a lie," the NFL Players Association said in a statement. "They hired several former federal prosecutors, brought in 'experts' and imposed a process with the stated goal of 'getting it right,' yet the management council refuses to step in and stop repeated manipulation of an already awful League-imposed system."

    The suspension prompted weeks of court hearings in three states resulting in three legal reprieves that kept Elliott on the field.

    The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals agreed to an expedited hearing for Elliott's arguments that he wasn't treated fairly by the league, but last week turned down his request for an injunction while the case was being heard.

    The same court ruled against New England quarterback Tom Brady last year over his four-game suspension in the "Deflategate" case. Unlike Elliott, Brady had won a lower-court ruling that delayed the suspension for a year.