Haunted Flicks in a Haunted Hotel - NBC Southern California

Haunted Flicks in a Haunted Hotel

The Hollywood Roosevelt is screening some screamers, Mondays in the Tropicana.

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    Haunted Flicks in a Haunted Hotel
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    Make for the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel's Tropicana Bar every Monday night in October for a free scary flick.

    If you've ever watched someone eat a hot dog without mustard or sing "Happy Birthday" without smiling, you'll know how we feel when we see a book or show that details haunted Hollywood but forgets to include the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel.

    This particular omission probably doesn't happen, or very rarely, because not only is the grand dame of the boulevard just a flat-out famous hotel, it is said to boast movie star ghosts, which few inns can claim. Montgomery Clift? He's said to play a ghost trumpet on one of the hotel's upper floors. Marilyn Monroe? She called the hotel home for a couple of years, meaning modern guests often check-in, hoping for a glimpse.

    So films, scares, and the Roosevelt make an excellent trio. Fans might know that the Tropicana Bar has done the whole free Monday Night Movie thing in the past, but the Monday movies are going eerie for the month of October. "An American Werewolf in London"? "Carrie"? They're on the schedule (Oct. 8 and 22, respectively). Oct. 15 will be an audience choice night. And "Halloween," appropriately enough, rounds out the spooky run on Oct. 29, and guests are invited to come in costume.

    There shall be "Halloween-themed drinks and eats" for sale -- Halloween as in the holiday -- in the Tropicana.

    Time on the Trop site is 8:30 p.m.

    Two things to say: If you don't put in some boulevard time before Oct. 31, and you live in LA, think that over; we happen to have one of the most storied streets in all the world right in our city, a thoroughfare that always feels pretty Oct. 31-y regardless of the date on the calendar.

    And two? The first Academy Awards were held at the Roosevelt, meaning that if you listen very closely, you might hear glasses clinking and 1920s people thanking their agents.

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