Rotten Apple 907: Burbank House Turned Into Halloween Attraction - NBC Southern California

Rotten Apple 907: Burbank House Turned Into Halloween Attraction

Burbank family turns home into neighborhood attraction

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    Rotten Apple 907: Burbank House Turned Into Halloween Attraction

    For 364 days of the year, it's 907 North California St.

    On Halloween, the Meyer's house becomes "Rotten Apple 907."

    "You get hooked on the screams," said Preston Meyer, homeowner. "I do it because it's an artistic outlet allowing you do things you normally won't do."

    Preston and his wife Diana have been spooking trick-or-treaters for 20 years.

    Rotten Apple 907: Why Meyer Family Continues to decorate

    [LA] Rotten Apple 907: Why Meyer Family Continues to decorate
    Preston Meyer talks about why his family continues to decorate their home.
    (Published Friday, Oct. 8, 2010)

    "When you get the first scream of the season coming through, then its all worth it," said Preston.

    This year, the couple is turning their home into "Nightmare at the Museum."

    "The historic Burbank museum which was open in the '40s has been reopened for midnight excursions at your own risk," said Preston.

    Rotten Apple 907: Mayor's Proclamation

    [LA] Rotten Apple 907: Mayor's Proclamation
    Preston Meyer talks about Burbank Mayor proclaming October 31st Rotten Apple 907 day.
    (Published Friday, Oct. 8, 2010)

    It should be a memorable year not just because of this year's theme, but because this year the mayor of Burbank is proclaiming Oct. 31, "Rotten Apple 907 Day," commemorating the anniversary.

    "It's nice to know that the community supports us," said Preston.

    It's a remarkable achievement for a family affair that started as a birthday party for Meyer's daughter.

    "It wasn't a birthday party anymore; now it was a haunted house," said Preston.

    Not just any haunted house, an estimated 1,500 visitors pass through the house before and on Halloween.

    The Meyers accept donations, which they contribute all the proceeds to local charities.

    "It's a public service," said Preston.