Warner Drive Project Approved - NBC Southern California

Warner Drive Project Approved

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Warner Drive Project Approved

     

    Wrapping up a few weeks of news concerning architect Eric Owen Moss, here's the latest: On Wednesday, the Culver City Planning Commission approved a Moss-designed garage, retail, and restaurant project planned for 8511 Warner Drive in the Conjunctive Points area. In this case, the Planning Commission has the final say (ie, it doesn't need to go to a full City Council vote), according to Jose Mendivil, Associate City Planner with Culver City. However, there is a 15-day appeal period if anyone would like to speak up.

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    Here's some excerpted details about the project from the Eric Owen Moss web site (renderings courtesy of):

    "The Parking Structure and Retail Project for 8511 Warner Drive will provide parking for new area businesses in 'Conjunctive Points', Culver City, California. The project will also serve the local residential and business community by providing a modest amount of retail and restaurant space -- 50,000 square feet -- currently lacking in the area.

    ---In addition to the parking, 40,000 square feet of retail space, and a 10,000 square foot restaurant, will be located on the interior perimeter of a five sided, three story, open courtyard space. The three floors of retail and space and the three story courtyard volume are positioned roughly in the center of the upper floors of the parking structure. Two full levels – floors two and three below grade – are filled with parking. Retail level -1, one floor below grade, retail level 0, at grade, and retail level two, above grade, are directly accessible from parked cars on those floors or from stairs and elevators that connect all garage floors to walks and bridges on all retail levels.

    ---A sod roof covers the top retail floor, reducing both heating and cooling loads, and serving as a small roof-top park."
     

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