First Alert Forecast

Chilly Temperatures, Spotty Showers: Here's Your SoCal Weather Outlook

Bundle up. Temperatures will remain below normal for the next few days after this week's record breaking rainstorm.

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Chilly temperatures are expected through next week in Southern California with a chance for more rain as the official start of winter draws near. 

Temperatures plummeted during Tuesday’s storm, which broke rainfall records throughout the drought-stricken state. Below-normal readings are expected again Thursday, as are light showers. 

Low temperatures Wednesday night will dip into the low and mid 40s in downtown LA, Anaheim, Long Beach and Irvine. Temperatures will drop into the upper 30s in Van Nuys, Thousand Oaks and Riverside. Residents in Lancaster, Santa Clarita and Victorville will feel the chill with temperatures in the low 30s. 

“We could have frost formation again on top of our cars (Thursday) morning,” said NBC4 forecaster Belen De Leon. 

Daytime highs will be in the mid to upper 50s for most of the region.

So what about the rain? 

This graphic shows rain season totals for 2021 and 2020, plus the rainfall average.

After a dry start Thursday, clouds will move in and bring light rain to parts of Southern California. Spotty showers are expected from late in the afternoon through early evening, but nothing like the downpours that drenched the region earlier this week. 

“This could last all the way through early Friday morning, but it's not going to add up to much,” De Leon said. “Remember, this time around we had inches of rain. This next storm is possibly going to bring us about a tenth of an inch, and not everybody will see the rain.”

Most of the rain will fall in Orange County and the South Bay. 

Expect sunny skies and cool conditions over the weekend with another storm possibly arriving during Christmas week. A storm system will make its way into Southern California early next week after the official start of winter on Tuesday, possibly bringing rain by mid-week.

"We'll be keeping an eye on that," De Leon said. "It could disrupt your travel plans."

Tuesday's storm left downtown Los Angeles with 3.03 inches of rainfall for the rain season, which starts Oct. 1. That's well above rainfall totals at this point last year.

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