Ongoing coverage of Bryan Stow attack and the lawsuit filed by the family

LAPD Officers Hand Out Sketches During Weekend Series

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    LOS ANGELES, CA - APRIL 14: A Los Angeles Police Department officer stands watch at an entrance to Dodger Stadium prior to the start of the baseball game between the St. Louis Cardinals and Los Angeles Dodgers on April 14, 2011 in Los Angeles, California. Large numbers of LAPD officers are being deployed as part of a zero tolerance policy toward misbehaving fans in response to the opening day attack on San Francisco Giants fan Bryan Stow two weeks ago. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

    Several Dodger fans were seen holding copies of the police sketches of the Dodger Stadium Opening Day parking lot attackers at this weekend’s series against the Cardinals.

    "I wanna catch those guys," said 13-year-old Matt, whose family members are longtime Dodger season ticket holders. He was holding a flyer with the sketches he said he printed from his computer.

    Some LAPD officers distributed flyers with the sketches to Dodger Stadium employees this weekend.

    "You never know if they’ll be stupid enough to come back," said one LAPD officer whose name is being withheld because he was not authorized to speak.

    There was talk among season ticket holders and stadium employees this weekend that they might have seen the parking lot attackers being warned by security guards about their behavior early in the game on Opening Day. However, they admitted the sketches were vague.

    "There are tons of guys at the games who look like that," said the LAPD officer.

    Still, several season ticket holders suggested that the attack could have been prevented had the team returned to a previous policy of zero tolerance by Dodger Stadium security guards, whereby unruly fans are ejected without warning. The fans say that ever since late last season, when the team fell out of contention and the McCourts’ divorce made headlines, the guards seemed more lenient with troublesome fans, issuing a warning before ejecting them.

    Also, a clearer picture emerged of how much the team is paying for the extra LAPD security. There are 200 officers per game, earning $50 per hour working an average of eight hours per game. This totals $80,000, but does not include the command post, mobile booking trailer, and dozens of LAPD vehicles being used to patrol the parking lots.

    Also not included is the Dodgers’ contract with Kroll and Associates, the security consulting firm headed by former LAPD Chief William Bratton. Bratton and Kroll West Coast head Jack Weiss, former L.A. City Council member, were at Dodger Stadium Saturday to meet with team officials. The firm is expected to issue its report to the Dodgers within the next few weeks.

    There is a $150,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of the suspects in the Opening Day beating. The victim, 42-year-old Bryan Stow, remains in a medically induced coma.