American Humane Association Questioned for Film, TV Safety Regulations

A writer for the Hollywood Reporter questions whether the "no animals were harmed" disclaimer in some movies, TV is accurate

By John Cádiz Klemack and Andrew Lopez
|  Monday, Nov 25, 2013  |  Updated 11:12 PM PDT
View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print
A scathing report in The Hollywood Reporter claims that animals are being harmed and in some cases killed during television and movie production. An official in charge of animal actors' safety called the report sensational. John Cadiz Klemack reports from Studio City for the NBC4 News at 5 p.m. Nov. 25, 2013.

John Cadiz Klemack

A scathing report in The Hollywood Reporter claims that animals are being harmed and in some cases killed during television and movie production. An official in charge of animal actors' safety called the report sensational. John Cadiz Klemack reports from Studio City for the NBC4 News at 5 p.m. Nov. 25, 2013.

advertisement

A report Monday in The Hollywood Reporter harshly criticized the American Humane Association, claiming safety regulations for animals during film and television productions are often overlooked.

Gary Baum, the author of the article, questions whether the “No Animals Were Harmed” disclaimer credit in some movies is truthful.

"Audience members want to believe, and the AHA wants everyone to believe, so they do whatever they can to make that happen," Baum said. “Everyone wants to trust it, and right now there’s no reason to do so."

Karen Rosa, the American Humane Association's senior advisor for the film and TV unit, believes the report is sensational, including a claim that the tiger in “Life of Pi” almost drowned during production.

"But the bottom line is that animal was not harmed. Did it have a troubling moment? Yes. Was a passionate rep over-exaggerating the situation? Possibly," Rosa said. "But the bottom line is no animal was harmed."

Dr. Kwane Stewart, a veterinarian and new director of the film and TV unit, said the culture of the AHA is changing under his watch.

"My job is to come in, break it down, implement new changes," Stewart said. "The focus will always be the animals. It will always be to give animals the voice and that's what I'll continue to do."

More Southern California Stories:

Follow NBCLA for the latest LA news, events and entertainment: iPhone/iPad App | Facebook | Twitter | Google+ | Instagram | RSS | Text Alerts | Email Alerts

Get the latest headlines sent to your inbox!
View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print
Leave Comments
What's New
Running Dry
Coverage of the California drought. Read more
Follow Us
Sign up to receive news and updates that matter to you.
Send Us Your Story Tips
Check Out