Long Beach

Young Latina Artist From Long Beach Seeks to Empower Women Through Art

As Ms. Yellow helps raise funds for abused women in Long Beach, she paints with the certainty that love and art cut across all barriers, even emotional ones.

Ms. Yellow Art

Nuria Ortiz, a Southern California artist of Mexican descent, is internationally recognized for her large and colorful spray paint murals. With her Latin heart, Ms. Yellow, as she likes to be called, manages to express powerful messages that invite equality and inclusion.

"I try to help, to teach what I do with my art to the community so that they can do more with it," says Ms. Yellow. "I go to different countries to teach. I travel, I paint murals, and I work with different communities.”

Galleries, museums, and the streets of the United States, France, Spain, Haiti, Mexico, and Egypt have witnessed her works of art.

"I was [in Haiti] last year teaching women art and different techniques and classes. I’m very excited to return.”

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Using her artistic skills, Ortiz is dedicated to sending a positive message to women around the world. She says she uses her skills and knowledge to empower women, for whom art can often serve as emotional therapy.

“I don't remember a moment without art at all. It's something that has been in me since I met life,” says Ortiz. "I really had this passion since I was like 3 years old. I started graffiti when I was 12 years old and from then on I didn't stop."

In the Los Angeles area, Ms. Yellow is decorating a truck for Angel City F.C., a new women's soccer team in Los Angeles.

"For me, it’s a huge honor to work with them!" she said.

Griselda and Miguelina grew up in New York City feeling like they didn't fit neatly into any of society's "boxes." It wasn't until they got older that they started to come to terms with their Blackness, and embraced what it means to be Afro-Dominican women.

Ms. Yellow is also helping a women's shelter in her hometown, Long Beach.

“I designed and painted these shirts to help raise funds for a shelter that helps women who have suffered abuse and are now struggling due to the pandemic," she said. "They lost a lot of money, and they need help.”

As Ms. Yellow helps raise funds for abused women in Long Beach, she paints with the certainty that love and art cut across all barriers, even emotional ones.

This story first appeared on NBCLA's sister station, Telemundo 52. Haz clic aquí para leer esta historia en español.

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